Beacon Lesson Plan Library

It's Your Wellness

Richard Rooker

Description

In this lesson the students will gain an understanding of factors that affect their wellness. The lesson will focus on the individual's responsibility to avoid personal risk behaviors that have a negative impact on wellness.

Standards

Florida Sunshine State Standards
HE.B.1.4.1
The student understands the role of individual responsibility regarding personal risk behaviors.

Florida Process Standards
Information Managers
01 Florida students locate, comprehend, interpret, evaluate, maintain, and apply information, concepts, and ideas found in literature, the arts, symbols, recordings, video and other graphic displays, and computer files in order to perform tasks and/or for enjoyment.

Materials

-Suggested textbook: Heit, Philip, and Linda Meeks. Health and Wellness. Blacklick, Ohio: Heit Publishing Co., 1999: 4-11.
-Booklet: What Everyone Should Know about Wellness. Channing L. Bete Company, 1998.
-Power Point Presentation created by Richard Rooker
-"Calculating Your Life Expectancy," Wellness: A Way of Life. Heath and Company, 1999.
-Computer with presentation system
-Duplicated pages from the attached file

Preparations

1. Be familiar with suggested readings for the Wellness lesson.
2. Be familiar enough with computers to present the PowerPoint.
3. Proficiency at printing out and running off handouts is required.

Procedures

1. Ask the students how long do they think they will live.

2. Let them take the Life Expectancy Survey and tell them it will give them an idea of how long they might live. Of course, no survey on life expectancy is always accurate. (See attached file.)

3. Define health as physical, mental, emotional, and social wellness.

4. Go through the following information with the students:

We might relate the four parts of wellness to the four tires on a car. If all four tires are properly inflated and balanced, the car runs smoothly. If one or more of the tires is low on air or not balanced, the tires will wear unevenly, and they will not last as long. If one or more of the tires goes flat, the car will run, but it will not run very well, and eventually the tire, wheel, brakes, axle, etc., will be destroyed, and the car will die. We need to balance and fix any of our flat tires.

5. Have students read What Everyone Should Know about Wellness.

6. Discuss how certain factors in our life affect our wellness.

7. Ask students to contribute to a class list of factors we can control and some factors we can not control. This could be done on the blackboard or an overhead projector.

Possible student answers might include the following:

We can control our diet, rest, attitude, exercise, stress, and bad habits.
We can not control our age, gender, environment and heredity.

8. Have the students read the assigned page 7 in the textbook, Health and Wellness and copy the categories of personal risk behaviors from the list below. (See attached file for a printable copy of the personal risk behaviors.)


Categories of Personal Risk Behaviors
-Behaviors that result in unintentional or intentional injuries.
-Tobacco use.
-Alcohol and other drug use.
-Sexual behaviors that result in HIV infection or other sexually transmitted diseases or unintentional pregnancies.
-Diet choices that contribute to disease.
-Lack of physical activity.

9. Show the PowerPoint on Wellness to review the main points presented in the lesson. (See attached file.)

10. Pass out the mouse pad template to each student. (See attached file.)

11. The students will design mouse pads that illustrate that they understand it is an individual's responsibility to avoid the negative effects of personal risk behaviors.

12. The student should include the following information on his/hermouse pad:

-The student should include each of the six personal risk behaviors in teens.
- For each of the six personal risk behaviors, the student illustrates that it is the individual's responsibility to avoid the negative effects for each risk behavior.
- The student should use written words as well as pictures that indicate the individual's responsibility to avoid personal risk behaviors.

13. Assess the activity.

Assessments

The evidence that the student has met the standard will be the creation of a mouse pad that shows the individual's responsibility to avoid the negative effects of personal risk behaviors. (See attached file for a printable copy of the mouse pad template.)

A rubric or checklist may be used to measure the degree of mastery of the standard.
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