Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Labor Pains

Richard Johnson
Bay District Schools

Description

This is an inquiry lesson where students read an account of the Chicago Haymarket Riot of 1886 and identify questions that need to be addressed to understand the historical circumstances surrounding the event. Student groups then research individual questions and present answers to the whole class, thus explaining the labor situation during this time.

Standards

Florida Sunshine State Standards
LA.A.2.4.1
The student determines the main idea and identifies relevant details, methods of development, and their effectiveness in a variety of types of written material.

LA.C.3.4.3
The student uses details, illustrations, analogies, and visual aids to make oral presentations that inform, persuade, or entertain.

LA.C.3.4.4
The student applies oral communication skills to interviews, group presentations, formal presentations, and impromptu situations.

SS.A.5.4.1
The student knows the causes of the Industrial Revolution and its economic, political, and cultural effects on American society.

SS.C.1.4.4
The student understands the role of special interest groups, political parties, the media, public opinion, and majority/minority conflicts on the development of public policy and the political process.

Florida Process Standards
Cooperative Workers
08 Florida students work cooperatively to successfully complete a project or activity.

Materials

-Paper to duplicate handouts for the lesson
-Transparency film
-Computer with projection device or TV, as well as a printer
-Resources from library, Internet, etc. for students' research
-Slips of paper for student names
-Resource Guide, teacher copy
-Haymarket Image and transparency template, classroom set and one transparency
-KIM Vocabulary Activity, a copy for every student
-Haymarket Riot Reading Assignment, a copy for every student
-Teacher's Guide for Potential Questions for the Haymarket Riot Reading Assignment, a teacher copy
-Addressing the Questions-Group Activity: Working Together as a Group Transparency Template, one transparency
-Addressing the Questions-Group Activity: Guidelines for Oral Presentations transparency template, one transparency
-Addressing the Questions-Group Activity: Addressing the Questions Group Activity directions sheet, one copy per group
-Addressing the Questions-Group Activity: Group Task List form, one copy per group
-Addressing the Questions-Group Activity: Addressing the Questions Group Activity Rubric, one per group
-Addressing the Questions-Group Activity: Individual Task Log, one copy per student
-Important Questions Concerning the Historical Circumstances Surrounding the Haymarket Riot template, one copy per student

Preparations

1. Read and familiarize yourself with the Haymarket Riot reading.
2. Gather resources from the Internet, school library, inter-library loans, etc. (see the Resource Guide document in the Attached Files section) for students to use in researching their answers to their questions concerning the Haymarket Riot.
4. Make a transparency of the sample vocabulary activity found in the K.I.M. Vocabulary Activity (See Attached Files).
3. Make a classroom set of the Haymarket Image (See Attached Files).
4. Make a transparency of the Haymarket Image.
5. Make a copy of the Haymarket Reading Assignment for each student if possible, which will allow him or her to make notes on the document prior to writing the questions. If paper is a problem, make a classroom set. Laminating each document of the classroom set and providing dry-erase pens to each student would facilitate note taking on the document without using the paper necessary in providing the document to each student.
6. Transcribe the questions generated by the students in each class to the Important Questions Concerning the Historical Circumstances Surrounding the Haymarket Riot template Word document. This document is considered a template because the questions that students generate will vary from each class. This document was left blank so that the particular questions for each class could be added to the blank document.
7. Make copies of all other handouts associated with this lesson.
8. Set up computer/TV to show the student generated questions.
9. Put student names by class onto slips of paper to be drawn during the grouping process
10. Make a list of the student generated questions as a guide for students to use during the questions' presentations. (This cannot be done until after the whole class identifies the most important questions.)
11. Set up classroom for student group presentations.

Procedures

This is lesson three of four lessons for the unit, America Gears Up.

1. Give students a classroom copy of the Haymarket Image (See Attached Files). Have them study the image and make guesses as to what is transpiring in the scene.

2. Show the Haymarket image transparency (See Attached Files) to stimulate interest in the lesson. Solicit responses from the whole class as to what they think may be happening in the scene. Based on previous American history courses, movies, or previous research, ask if any students know what the labor situation was during the latter part of the 19th century. Solicit responses. Give a short overview of what was actually happening in the Haymarket image based on the information contained in the Haymarket Riot article (sSee Attached Files).

3. Students complete a vocabulary activity in order to have a foundation for the upcoming reading assignment. Give each student a copy of the KIM Vocabulary Activity (See Attached Files). (KIM stands for Key Concept, Information, and Memory Map.) Students define the concept or term and then draw a representation of the term, which provides them with a mental image to help them visualize the concept, thus aiding in remembering it. Go over directions for completing the activity. Show a transparency of sample answers included in the activity document. Have them complete the vocabulary activity in class. These are the vocabulary terms that they will need to know for the upcoming reading selection. If students don't finish in class, they should finish at home.

4. Discuss vocabulary terms at the beginning of class. Let several students show and explain by duplicating their memory maps on transparency film for the different terms. Take up their vocabulary assignment and review for accuracy and completeness and return to the students.

5. Give each student a copy of the Haymarket Riot Reading Assignment (See Attached Files). Go over the directions for the assignment. Give a few examples of the types of questions that students should be identifying from the reading assignment. (Examples of questions are found in the Teacher's Guide for Potential Questions for the Haymarket Riot Reading Assignment (See Attached Files). Let students start the reading assignment in class.) Circulate around the classroom and provide help as students are reading. Have them finish the assignment at home.

6. Solicit important questions from the students concerning the reading assignment. Select a student to use the computer/TV to type in the questions as they are identified. Refer to the Teacher's Guide for Potential Questions for the Haymarket Riot Reading Assignment to make sure all of the important questions have been created. If there are any gaps, prompt students to come up with the missing questions. Go to the initial list with the students. Cull the questions down to only the most pertinent ones. Group similar questions into categories. There will probably be a major question and clarifying or extending questions for each category.

7. Print a copy of the major and clarifying questions for each category, one category per page. Divide the number of question categories into the number of students to determine the maximum amount of students in the group to answer the question in a category. Draw slips of paper with student names to determine the order of students signing up for a question. When a student's name is drawn, they place their name on the category sign-up sheet that they want to help answer. This process determines the groups that work on answering each question. (There is more information for the group activity found in the Addressing the Questions Group Activity document (See Attached Files). Take up the questions section of the reading assignment and review for completion and pertinence.

8. Go over the Working Together as a Group transparency and the Guidelines for Oral Presentations transparency found in the Addressing the Questions Group Activity document (See Attached Files). Give each group an Addressing the Questions Group Activity sheet, Group Task List form, and Addressing the Questions Group Activity Rubric, as well an Individual Task Log for each student. Go over the directions, forms, and rubric. Have each group elect a leader and determine tasks for the members of the group.

9. Using the available resources that were gathered prior to starting the lesson, group members research the answers to the questions in their category and prepare for the presentation of their answers. Prior to the presentations, informally check the final product of each group to make sure their answers and presentations are informative, accurate, and organized.

10. Give each student a copy of Important Questions Concerning the Historical Circumstances Surrounding the Haymarket Riot and go over the directions for completing this presentation guide. Take up the presenting group's Addressing the Questions Group Activity Rubric and assess as they are presenting. Have each group present the answers to their questions. Students in the audience should write answers to each of the questions. Time should be given at the end of each presentation for questions from both the students and the teacher.

11. Take up the completed Questions Concerning the Historical Circumstances Surrounding the Haymarket Riot from each student and review their answers to the questions based on thoroughness and accuracy of their answers. Return so that the students can use the guide for the upcoming summative assessment.

12. Have students complete the lesson three section of the America Gears Up Journal.

13. If using this lesson as part of the America Gears Up Unit, then have students turn in the Project Proposal Form. Check this form and either approve the method of presenting their projects or provide feedback that helps them get on the right track. They should start solidifying their project during Lesson 4 and be ready to finalize it in the days immediately following Lesson 4: Labor Pains.

Assessments

Assessments for this lesson are formative in nature and are based on the formulation of and answers to questions generated from the reading of the Haymarket riot account.

1. The KIM Vocabulary Activity is assessed for the students' understanding of the terms.

2. The questions concerning the circumstances surrounding the Haymarket affair that students generate in the Haymarket Riot Reading Assignment are assessed. Assessment on this assignment should be based on whether the questions that the students generate are sufficient to explain the circumstances surrounding the event and whether the questions are relevant to the event.

3. The student group presentations are assessed using the accompanying rubric (See Attached Files). This rubric assesses for group interaction, presentation skills, and the accuracy and thoroughness of the content.

4. The students' answers on the Questions Concerning the Historical Circumstances Surrounding the Haymarket Riot handout, answered by the group presentations, are assessed for accuracy and thoroughness.

Extensions

Click here to view the Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson. See Attached Files to download the Unit Plan Overview, Unit Assessments, and other attached files.

Web Links

This site contains information that can be used to answer some of the student generated questions from the reading on the Haymarket Riot article.
Library of Congress: The Learning Page-The Rise of Industrial America 1865-1900

This is a good source for more information on the Haymarket Riot.
Chicago Historical Society: Haymarket Riot

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