Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Analyzing Persuasion

Sherry Czupryk

Description

Students identify and explain the persuasive devices used in -I Have a Dream.- This is the culminating lesson of a unit on analyzing persuasion. See lessons with -Persuasion- in the title.

Objectives

The student identifies devices of persuasion and methods of appeal and their effectiveness.

The student drafts and revises writing that: is focused, purposeful, and reflects insight into the writing situation; has an organizational pattern that provides for a logical progression of ideas; has effective use of transitional devices that contribute to a sense of completeness; has support that is substantial, specific, relevant, and concrete; demonstrates a commitment to and involvement with the subject; uses creative writing strategies as appropriate to the purpose of the paper; demonstrates a mature command of language with precision of expression; has varied sentence structure; and has few, if any, convention errors in mechanics, usage, punctuation, and spelling.

The student produces final documents that have been edited for: correct spelling; correct punctuation, including commas, colons, and common use of semicolons; correct capitalization; correct sentence formation; correct instances of possessives, subject/verb agreement, instances of noun/pronoun agreement, and the intentional use of fragments for effect; and correct formatting that appeals to readers, including appropriate use of a variety of graphics, tables, charts, and illustrations in both standard and innovative forms.

Materials

- A copy of -I Have a Dream- by Martin Luther King for each student
-A copy of the essay rubric for each student.

Preparations

1. Make copies of -I Have a Dream.-
2. Make copies of the essay rubric for each student.

Procedures

1. Give a copy of -I Have a Dream- to each student.

2. The class reads the essay aloud.

3.The students do the following pre-writing activity:

Explain that:
A good persuasive essay will include the use of rhetoric - the art of using language effectively. Common rhetorical devices include the rhetorical question, hyperbole; allusion, metaphor, simile, personification, connotative language, and parallel structure.

Students create a table that includes 10 examples of the use of rhetoric and an explanation of the effects on the reader.

Students participate in a discussion of different examples from student information tables that illustrate the different persuasive elements.

Students take the informaion from the completed table and organize it into proper essay form: introduction, body, and conclusion.

4.The students respond to the following essay:

Explain how Martin Luther King, Jr. uses persuasive devices to help him achieve his purpose in -I Have a Dream.-

Assessments

The teacher will use the following rubric to assess the essays:

GREAT: Essay is well-organized, with excellent use of specific examples and integration of quotes. The student has excellent diction, varied and effective sentence structure, and no mistakes in punctuation and grammar. The student fully understands the author's use of persuasive techniques to achieve his purpose.

NICE WORK: Essay is fairly well-organized, with good use of specific examples and integration of quotes. The student has good command of diction, some varied and effective sentence structure, and few mistakes in punctuation and grammar. The student understands the author's use of the elements of persuasive techniques, but not as well as the best essays.

ACCEPTABLE: Essay is somewhat organized with some use of specific examples and quotes. The student has mediocre diction, simple and/or ineffective sentence structure, and/or several mistakes in punctuation and/or grammar. The student has little understanding of the author's use of persuasive techniques to achieve his purpose.

SEE ME AND LET'S TALK: Essay is poorly organized, with little use of specific examples and integration of quotes. The student has poor diction, ineffective/or incorrect sentence structure, and/or several mistakes in grammar and/or punctuation. The student has little or no understanding of the author's use of persuasive techniques to achieve his purpose.
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