Beacon Lesson Plan Library

When Old Meets New

Lisa Ove Gibson
Bay District Schools

Description

Using a T-chart, students synthesize and separate collected information. Students define comparison and contrast in literature for diagnostic assessment.

Objectives

The student compiles information using graphic organizers (for example, timelines, circle diagrams).

The student compares and contrasts characters from various texts.

Materials

-At least 2 sheets of chart paper
-2 student T-charts (see associated file)
-2 teacher models (see associated file)
-Suggested narrative reading selection about Hercules from [D'Aulaire's Book of Greek Myths] by Ingi D'Aulaire, Edgar Parin D'Aulaire, October 19, 1962, Doubleday

Preparations

1. Find and distribute a narrative reading selection that describes Hercules. This piece should not take more than 15 minutes for students to read. I recommend selecting an excerpt from [D'Aulaire's Book of Greek Myths] by Ingri D'Aulaire and Edgar Prin D'Aulaire; copyright October 19, 1962.

2. Provide the graphic organizers (2 are attached).

3. For students who do not have prior knowledge of Hercules, supplement this lesson with a second short story involving Hercules.

4. Create a transparency of these questions: How and why are graphic organizers used
and In what kinds of reading situations is it helpful to use comparison and contrast?

5. Create a transparency of the 2 teacher models (see associated file).

Procedures

1. Diagnostic assessment - On a sheet of paper students respond to these questions: How and why are graphic organizers used; How is comparison and contrast used in the analysis of literature? Student responses will serve as a diagnostic assessment for this mini unit. The answers to these questions will be revealed to students later in this lesson and reinforced throughout this mini-unit. (It is important to read student's responses to better prepare for the upcoming lessons.)

2. When students completely answer these questions collect each student's answers. Explain that the information will be used to determine what they already know (These statements should not be graded).

3. Ask students - Do you know anything about Hercules? Have you seen the Disney movie titled [Hercules]?

4. Ask students what character traits they would use to describe Hercules (he is blonde/brunette, he is strong/weak, etc.).

5. Lead students in a verbal discussion about Hercules' character traits. Prepare a list of Hercules' character traits in case students do not have background knowledge.

6. Write “Previous Knowledge” on chart paper (#1).

7. Record student's verbal responses from the discussion on chart paper #1 (try to generate as many character traits as you can from students and question them further if they appear to be stuck).

8. Ask students who have not heard of Hercules to ask questions about him so that they would be able to know him better. (The teacher can use these questions as an opportunity to create more character traits, if another student in the room knows the answer to any of the questions.)

9. Teacher and students observe the compiled list of Hercules' character traits on chart #1.

10. Find and distribute a narrative reading selection that describes Hercules. This piece should not take more than 15 minutes for students to read. I recommend selecting an excerpt from [D'Aulaire's Book of Greek Myths] by Ingri D'Aulaire and Edgar Prin D'Aulaire; copyright October 19, 1962.

11. Check student's responses to the diagnostic questions, while students are reading the selection. If they understand the purpose of graphic organizers, comparison and contrast between characters of separate texts then review the course of instruction throughout this mini-unit and omit any unnecessary instruction. Another option would be to sophisticate the graphic organizers, the texts, or the characters to meet the needs of your students.

12. Ask students to respond on a sheet of paper, “What are Hercules' character traits from the reading section?” Require that students record at least 5 traits. Explain that the ideas that they write on this paper will be used during a class discussion and will not be collected.

13. Post chart paper #2 next to #1 and title this Character traits from TITLE OF THE READING SELECTION.

14. Prompt students to share their ideas of Hercules' character traits that were discovered through reading and choose a student to record these ideas on chart paper #2.

15. While the class is responding verbally, travel from desk to desk checking to see if each student has 5 plausible traits from the reading selection. Provide feedback for students who do not appear to understand.

16. Explain to students at this time that in today's activity we used comparison and contrast. Comparison and contrast are used in literature to identify similar ideas and conflicting concepts in 2 separate texts. Comparison and contrast are used in literature to identify the similarities and differences between characters from various texts. The purpose of comparing and contrasting characters form 2 texts is to help the student recognize the complex elements of character development within literature.

17. Students use a T-chart to record Hercules' character traits from previous knowledge in the first column and his traits from the reading selection in the second column (see associated file). Feel free to adapt this file, as you see fit. The construction of the answers for the T-chart from the class discussion is meant to offer students a model to follow when creating their own and should not be formatively assessed.

18. Provide a mini lesson on the usefulness of a T-chart to separate ideas from different sources. Be sure to include that a graphic organizer can serve as practice for summarizing a reading selection. Also graphic organizers enable the writer to separate compiled information in a visual way.

19. For homework, students list the qualities of elementary school in the left column and the elements of middle school in the right column (see associated file for expected student outcomes). Require that students include at least 5 traits of each type of school. The completion of this assignment will serve as the formative assessment tool for this lesson.

Assessments

Diagnostic - On a separate piece of paper students respond to these questions: How and why are graphic organizers used; How is comparison and contrast used in the analysis of literature? Answers: Graphic organizers enable the writer to separate compiled information in a visual way. A graphic organizer offers a summarized version of a larger piece of writing. Comparison and contrast is used in literature to identify similar ideas and conflicting concepts in 2 separate texts. Also, after reading 2 texts it is important for students to compare and contrast separate characters. Comparison and contrast is used in literature to identify the similarities and differences between characters from various texts. The purpose of comparing and contrasting characters from 2 texts is to help the student recognize the complex elements of character development within literature. It is important to read student's responses to better prepare for the upcoming lessons. If they understand the purpose of graphic organizers, comparison and contrast between characters of separate texts then review the course of instruction throughout this mini-unit and omit any unnecessary instruction. Another option would be to sophisticate the graphic organizers, the texts, or the characters to meet the needs of your students.

Formative - Students use a T-chart to record Hercules' character traits from Previous knowledge in the first column and his traits from the reading selection in the second column (see associated file). The teacher offers a model for students to follow, but does not assess this assignment.

Formative Assessment - Students list the qualities of elementary school in the left column and the elements of middle school in the right column of a second T-chart (see associated file). Make sure students include at least 5 character traits in each column of the T-charts to allow for practice for the summative assessment for this mini-unit. There are 2 examples of expected student outcomes available in the associated files and each one is titled Teacher Model. The completion of this assignment will serve as the formative assessment tool for this lesson.

Extensions

(A) Student must have prior knowledge about Hercules, how to use a T-chart, how to identify character traits, and an ability to draw comparisons and contrasts.
(B) This is the first lesson in a mini-unit titled Mythology in the Middle.
(C) Find and distribute a narrative reading selection that describes Hercules. This piece should not take more than 15 minutes for students to read. I recommend selecting an excerpt from [D'Aulaire's Book of Greek Myths] by Ingri D'Aulaire and Edgar Prin D'Aulaire; copyright October 19, 1962.

The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2946. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll tot the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

Web Links

This Website offers information about Hercules and his relationships with other Greek mortals, gods, and goddess. Use keyword searches within these sites to acquire specific information about Hercules.
Encyclopedia Mythica

This Website offers information about Hercules and his relationships with other Greek mortals, gods, and goddess. Use keyword searches within these sites to acquire specific information about Hercules.
Thomas Bulfinch Bulfinch’s Mythology

This Website offers information about Hercules and his relationships with other Greek mortals, gods, and goddess. Use keyword searches within these sites to acquire specific information about Hercules.
Greek Mythology Today & the Myth of the Month

This Website offers information about Hercules and his relationships with other Greek mortals, gods, and goddess. Use keyword searches within these sites to acquire specific information about Hercules.
MYTHWEB

This Website offers information about Hercules and his relationships with other Greek mortals, gods, and goddess. Use keyword searches within these sites to acquire specific information about Hercules.
Hercules Greece’s Greatest Hero

Attached Files

When Old Meets New Associated Files     File Extension: pdf

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