Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Persuasion and Use of Language

Sherry Czupryk

Description

Students analyze Henry's use of connotative language, hyperbole, allusion, and rhethorical question in -Speech to the Virginia Convention.- This is second in a series of lessons on persuasive devices.

Objectives

The student identifies devices of persuasion and methods of appeal and their effectiveness.

The student drafts and revises writing that: is focused, purposeful, and reflects insight into the writing situation; has an organizational pattern that provides for a logical progression of ideas; has effective use of transitional devices that contribute to a sense of completeness; has support that is substantial, specific, relevant, and concrete; demonstrates a commitment to and involvement with the subject; uses creative writing strategies as appropriate to the purpose of the paper; demonstrates a mature command of language with precision of expression; has varied sentence structure; and has few, if any, convention errors in mechanics, usage, punctuation, and spelling.

The student produces final documents that have been edited for: correct spelling; correct punctuation, including commas, colons, and common use of semicolons; correct capitalization; correct sentence formation; correct instances of possessives, subject/verb agreement, instances of noun/pronoun agreement, and the intentional use of fragments for effect; and correct formatting that appeals to readers, including appropriate use of a variety of graphics, tables, charts, and illustrations in both standard and innovative forms.

The student understands the subtleties of literary devices and techniques in the comprehension and creation of communication.

Materials

-A copy of -Speech to the Virginia Convention- for each student
-A copy of the scoring rubric for each student (see assessment section)

Preparations

1. Make a copy of -Speech to the Virginia Convention- for each student.

2. Prepare a definition and examples of connotative language, hyperbole, allusion and rhetorical question to be written on the board, overhead, computer, etc.

3. Make a copy of the essay grading rubric for each student.

Procedures

1. Write the definitions of connotative language, hyperbole, allusion, and rhetorical question on the board and discuss them with the class.

2. Divide the class into groups of four.

3. Divide -Speech to the Virginia Convention- into sections, so that each group has one section to analyze for these devices.

4. Instruct the groups to identify the examples of connotative language, hyperbole, allusion and rhetorical question in their section and to explain what effect is elicited by each example.

5. Have the groups present their examples to the class, with each member of the group participating.
The entire class discusses the appropriateness of the answers.

6. Assign each student a one or two paragraph essay explaining the author's use of these devices to achieve his purpose.

Assessments

The teacher will assess the students' essays using the following rubric:

GREAT: Essay is well-organized, with excellent use of specific examples and integration of quotes. The student has excellent diction, varied and effective sentence structure, and no mistakes in punctuation and grammar. The student fully understands the author's use of the elements of connotative language, hyperbole, allusion, and rhetorical question in order to achieve his purpose.

NICE WORK: Essay is fairly well-organized, with good use of specific examples and integration of quotes. The student has good command of diction, some varied and effective sentence structure, and few mistakes in punctuation and grammar. The student understands the author's use of the elements of connotative language, hyperbole, allusion, and rhetorical question in order to achieve his purpose, but not as well as the best essays.

ACCEPTABLE: Essay is somewhat organized, with some use of specific examples and quotes. The student has mediocre diction, simple and/or ineffective sentence structure, and/or several mistakes in punctuation and/or grammar. The student has little understanding of the author's use of the elements of connotative language, hyberbole, allusion, and rhetorical question in order to achieve his purpose.

SEE ME AND LET'S TALK: The essay is poorly organized, with little use of specific examples and integration of quotes. The student has poor diction, ineffective and/or incorrect sentence structure, and/or several mistakes in grammar and/or punctuation. The student has little or no understanding of the author's use of the elements of connotative language, hyperbole, allusion, and rhetorical question in order to achieve his purpose.
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