Beacon Lesson Plan Library

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Lisa Ove Gibson
Bay District Schools

Description

Students compare and contrast characters from various texts and compile the collected information into several graphic organizers.

Objectives

The student compiles information using graphic organizers (for example, timelines, circle diagrams).

The student compares and contrasts characters from various texts.

Materials

-Scoring Rubric (see Extensions)
-Scramble Venn Diagram #2 (see Extensions)
-Student Answer Sheet (see Extensions)
-Teacher's Key for Scramble Venn Diagram #2 (see Extensions)
-2 poems How to be Zeus and How to be Poseidon (see Extensions)
-Find and distribute 2 separate narrative reading selections (I recommend selecting excerpts from [D'aulaire's Book of Greek Myths] by Ingri D'Aulaire and Edgar Prin D'Aulaire; copyright October 19, 1962, Doubleday)
-Create a Teacher Key for possible answers for the summative assessment where students create a T-chart and a Venn diagram to compare and contrast characters from various texts

Preparations

1.1. Provide the original diagnostic questions for students to define.

2. Check students' answers to these questions. Provide feedback for students who do not appear to understand. This will allow students to review the concepts before beginning the summative assessments.

3. Begin summative assessment #1 by providing a copy of the poems -How to be Poseidon and How to be Zeus for students (see Extensions).


4. Provide a copy of the Scramble Venn Diagram #2 that compares/contrasts the elements of the poems - How to be Poseidon and How to be Zeus - INCORRECTLY (see Extensions).

5. Provide a copy of the "Student Answer Sheet for the Scramble Venn Diagram #2" for students (see Extensions).

6. Provide the directions for the assignment: The ideas collected from the 2 poems -How to be Poseidon and How to be Zeus are INCORRECTLY arranged in Scramble Venn Diagram #2. After reading the 2 poems and looking at the incorrect Venn, decide how to correctly organize the information given. Finally, write the ideas correctly on the Venn diagram titled Student Answer Sheet.

7. Use the file Teacher Key for Scramble Venn Diagram #2 to assess student understanding (see Extensions). There should be at least 4 correctly placed elements in each section of the Venn diagram for mastery. Score each student's Student Answer Sheet for the Scramble Venn Diagram #2.

8. Return the graded product to students.

9. Begin summative assessment #2. Find and distribute 2 separate narrative reading selections (I recommend selecting excerpts from [D'aulaire's Book of Greek Myths] by Ingri D'Aulaire and Edgar Prin D'Aulaire; copyright October 19, 1962, Doubleday). Make sure that there are enough character traits for each character so students will be able to identify at least 5 similarities and differences between these characters. It is imperative that each element from the Graphic Organizer Rubric be represented in the reading selections. In other words, make sure that a student would not be penalized in the summative assessment because one or both of the reading selections are missing critical information.

10. Allow ample time for the students to complete both reading selections and time to construct and check both of their graphic organizers (this assignment can be completed at home if there is not enough time in class).

11. Provide a copy of the Scoring Rubric for each student (see Extensions).

12. Score every student's T-chart and Venn diagram by using the criteria established in the Scoring Rubric.

13. Return the graded product to students. If most students have mastered these skills, then continue the curriculum in your class. If some students still have not acquired these skills, offer alternative forms of assessment and instruction to facilitate student mastery.

Procedures

1. On a sheet of paper students need to respond to these questions: How and why are graphic organizers used; How is comparison and contrast used in the analysis of literature? Student responses to these questions need to be re-evaluated (originally these questions were asked on day 1 for the diagnostic).

2. Collect each student's answers.

3. Check students' answers to these questions. Use the answers to assess each student's ability to recall the definitions of comparison/contrast in literature and the purpose of graphic organizers in reading (see the assessment section of this lesson plan for more detailed information).

4. Provide feedback for students who do not appear to understand either question (this will allow students to review the concepts before beginning the summative assessments).

5. Provide a copy of the poems -How to be Poseidon and How to be Zeus (see Extensions).

6. Provide a copy of the Scramble Venn Diagram #2 that compares/contrasts the elements of the poems- How to be Poseidon and How to be Zeus – INCORRECTLY (see Extensions).

7. Provide these directions for the assignment: The ideas collected from the 2 poems -How to be Poseidon and How to be Zeus are INCORRECTLY arranged in Scramble Venn Diagram #2. After reading the 2 poems and looking at the incorrect Venn diagram, decide how to correctly organize the information given. There should be at least 4 correctly placed elements in each section of the Venn diagram for mastery. Finally, write the ideas correctly on the Venn diagram titled Student Answer Sheet.

8. Students read the 2 poems and look at the incorrect Venn diagram, then they decide how to correctly re-organize the information given.

9. Provide a copy of the Student Answer Sheet for the Scramble Venn Diagram #2 for students to record their answers.

10. Use the file Teacher Key for Scramble Venn Diagram #2 to assess student understanding (see-associated file). In this activity, students synthesize collected information and after reading the original texts they re-organize these ideas in a corrected version of the graphic organizer. The CORRECTED Venn diagram is the first summative assessment.


11. Provide a copy of the Scoring Rubric for each student (see Extensions).

12. Find and distribute 2 separate narrative reading selections (I recommend selecting excerpts from [D'aulaire's Book of Greek Myths] by Ingri D'Aulaire and Edgar Prin D'Aulaire; copyright October 19, 1962, Doubleday). When selecting the reading material make sure that there are enough character traits for each character so students will be able to identify at least 5 similarities and differences between these characters. It is imperative that EACH element from the Graphic Organizer Rubric be represented in the reading selections. In other words, make sure that a student would not be penalized in the summative assessment because one or both of the reading selections are missing critical information.

13. Students read each narrative reading selection then create a T-chart and a Venn diagram (on their own paper) which compares/contrasts a character from each. These graphic organizers should follow the criteria established in the Scoring Rubric (see Extensions).

14. Allow ample time for the students to complete both reading selections and time to construct and check both of their graphic organizers (this assignment can be completed at home if there is not enough time in class).

15. Score every student's T-chart and Venn diagram by using the criteria established in the Scoring Rubric.

16. Return the graded product to students. If most students have mastered these skills, then continue the curriculum in your class. If some students still have not acquired these skills, use alternative forms of assessment and instruction to facilitate student mastery.

Assessments

Follow-up for the diagnostic assessment - Students (on a piece of paper) respond to these questions: How and why are graphic organizers used; How is comparison and contrast used in the analysis of literature? Hopefully they can describe the uses for graphic organizers and the purpose for comparing and contrasting characters from separate texts. Answers from students should be variations of the following: comparison and contrast are used in literature to identify the similarities and differences between characters from various texts. The purpose of comparing and contrasting characters form 2 texts is to help the student recognize the complex elements of character development within literature. Graphic organizers can serve as practice for summarizing a reading selection. Also they enable the writer to separate compiled information in a visual way. Since the summative assessment is measuring the PROCESS of using comparison/contrast and graphic organizers to compile, synthesize, and separate characters from various texts, student's definitions of these concepts should not be significant in deciding student comprehension. Student' s definitions are for the teacher to decide if the student has internalized the information from the week and made it their own by putting the concepts of comparison/contrast and graphic organizers in their own words. Check students' answers to these questions. Provide feedback for students who do not appear to understand. This will allow students to review the concepts before beginning the summative assessments.

Summative assessment activity # 1 - Students read the poems How to be Poseidon and How to be Zeus. Students receive a scramble Venn diagram that contains information from both poems. This information is INCORRECTLY placed in the Venn diagram. Students re-distribute the information on the Venn diagram so that the correct comparisons between the poems are listed in the overlapping area of the 2 circles. The elements that are exclusive to Poseidon are on the left side of the graphic organizer and the ideas that are specific to Zeus are on the right side of the Venn diagram. There should be at least 4 correctly placed elements in each section of the Venn diagram for a passing score on this assessment. Score each student's Student Answer Sheet for the Scramble Venn Diagram #2. Return the graded product to students.

Summative assessment activity # 2 - Students read 2 separate narrative reading selections (I recommend selecting excerpts from [D'aulaire's Book of Greek Myths] by Ingri D'Aulaire and Edgar Prin D'Aulaire; copyright October 19, 1962, Doubleday). Project Gutenberg, which is a Website that offers numerous electronic texts that are downloadable and in many cases free of excessive copyright parameters. Students create a T-chart and a Venn diagram (on their own paper) which compares/contrasts a character from reading selection. These graphic organizers should follow the criteria established in the Scoring Rubric. Students' graphic organizers are assessed in 2 categories. There are 4 levels of achievement in each category. The categories are as follows: (1) Compiles character traits using graphic organizers; (2) Compares and contrasts characters from different texts. The stages of achievement in each category are Level 1 - Emerging, Level 2 - Developing, Level 3 - Accomplished, Level 4 - Exemplary. Each of these graphic organizers should show where the student compiled information from 2 reading selections, then compared and contrasted a character from each text. Make sure that there are enough character traits for each character so students will be able to identify at least 5 similarities and differences between these characters. It is imperative that each element from the Scoring Rubric be represented in the reading selections. In other words, make sure that a student would not be penalized in the summative assessment because one or both of the reading selections are missing critical information. Allow ample time for the students to complete both reading selections and time to construct and check both of their graphic organizers. This assignment can be completed at home if there is not enough time in class. Score every student's T-chart and Venn diagram by using the criteria established in the Scoring Rubric. Return the graded product to students. If most students have mastered these skills, then continue the curriculum in your class. If some students still have not acquired these skills, use alternative forms of assessment and instruction to facilitate student mastery.

Extensions

(A) This is the 4th and final lesson in the mini-unit Mythology in the Middle. This lesson provides the summative assessments for the mini-unit.
The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2946. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll tot the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (Scoring Rubric, Scramble Venn Diagram #2, Student Answer Sheet, Teacher’s Key for Scramble Venn Diagram #2, 2 poems How to be Zeus and How to be Poseidon).
(B) Student must have prior knowledge about, how to use a T-chart, how to use a Venn diagram, how to identify character traits, and an ability to draw comparisons and contrasts.
(C) Find and distribute 2 narrative reading selections. Each selection should clearly describe at least 1 character. Make sure that there are enough character traits for each character so students will be able to identify at least 5 similarities and differences between these characters. It is imperative that each element from the Graphic Organizer Rubric be represented in the reading selections. In other words, make sure that a student would not be penalized in the summative assessment because one or both of the reading selections are missing critical information. I recommend selecting an excerpt from [D'aulaire's Book of Greek Myths] by Ingri D'Aulaire and Edgar Prin D'Aulaire; copyright October 19, 1962. Another possible electronic source is Project Gutenberg, which contains a multitude of literature (see the URL address in the WebLinks section of this lesson plan).

Web Links

This Website offers information about Hercules and his relationships with other Greek mortals, gods, and goddess. Use keyword searches within these sites to acquire specific information about Hercules.
Encyclopedia Mythica

This Website offers information about Hercules and his relationships with other Greek mortals, gods, and goddess. Use keyword searches within these sites to acquire specific information about Hercules.
Thomas Bulfinch Bulfinch’s Mythology

This Website offers information about Hercules and his relationships with other Greek mortals, gods, and goddess. Use keyword searches within these sites to acquire specific information about Hercules.
Greek Mythology Today & the Myth of the Month

This Website offers information about Hercules and his relationships with other Greek mortals, gods, and goddess. Use keyword searches within these sites to acquire specific information about Hercules.
MYTHWEB

This Website offers information about Hercules and his relationships with other Greek mortals, gods, and goddess. Use keyword searches within these sites to acquire specific information about Hercules.
Hercules Greece’s Greatest Hero

The Project Gutenberg Web-site offers numerous electronic texts, use the title or author's name to find the text you need. A note of caution, most of these authors are deceased and their works are known as classic literature.
Project Gutenberg

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