Beacon Lesson Plan Library

A Colony is Born : Lesson 6 -To Leave or Not to Leave

Katie Koehnemann
Bay District Schools

Description

A pivotal point of the unit. Students, assigned a reason for coming to the New World, will utilize the resources in their notebook to establish an identity. Three regions settled will be identified, and students will associate with a particular region.

Objectives

The student reads text and determines the main idea or essential message, identifies relevant supporting details and facts, and arranges events in chronological order.

The student reads and organizes information for a variety of purposes, including making a report, conducting interviews, taking a test, and performing an authentic task.

The student uses a variety of methods and sources to understand history (such as interpreting diaries, letters, newspapers; and reading maps and graphs) and knows the difference between primary and secondary sources.

The student understands why Colonial America was settled in regions.

The student extends previously learned knowledge and skills of the fourth grade level with increasingly complex reading texts and assignments and tasks (for example, explicit and implicit ideas).

The student reads and organizes information from multiple sources for a variety of purposes (for example, supporting opinions, predictions, and conclusions; writing a research report; conducting interviews; taking a test; performing tasks).

The student compares and contrasts primary and secondary accounts of selected historical events (for example, diary entries from a soldier in a Civil War battle and newspaper articles about the same battle).

The student knows significant events in the colonization of North America, including but not limited to the Jamestown and Plymouth settlements, and the formation of the thirteen original colonies.

The student understands selected aspects of everyday life in Colonial America (for example, impact of religions, types of work, use of land, leisure activities, relations with Native Americans, slavery).

Materials

- An EXCELLENT resource to help students on customs, family life, home, clothing, food, fun, religion, education, occupations, and relations with the Indians is the book titled Everday Life: Colonial Timesby Walter A. Hazen. It can be located at a school/teacher supply store. ISBN # 0-673-36322-8
- The cards described below should be printed on three different colors, two each of yellow, orange, and green. (In Associated File) (You will have two yellow groups reporting on the Southern Colonies, two orange groups on the Middle Colonies, and two green groups on the New England Colonies.) When it is time for students to get into their groups, they will simply arrange themselves in groups of like color. This is an easy organizational tool and check method for you to see that everyone is in the correct group when students are moving about looking for their group.
- Cards, each prepared withthe following information:
A colonist name (both male and female name cards are included so students will draw either a male or female identity card, which ever is appropriate),
Reason for leaving England,
Occupation, and
Color coded to represent the settled region.
- Any kind of a colonial looking crockery bowl, wooden bowl, or heavy basket that students can't see the color of the cards through, to place cards in to draw out of. (2 needed. One for boys; one for girls.)
- Who I Am . . . Where I'm Going identification sheet (hole punched) for each student. (In Associated File)
- Glue
- Desk arrangement set to accommodate six different groups of five to six students each (See NOTE on #4 of Procedure)
- Colonial costume for the teacher to wear (OPTIONAL)
- Candle in colonial era type candlestick holder (OPTIONAL)
- Sheets of colored construction paper to identify groups (These must correspond with the colors used to make the student identity cards.)
- Task transparency (In Associated File)
- A chart tablet or sheets of chart paper for each of the six groups
- Marker to write with for each of the six groups
- Historical Facts Guide, hole punched
- Regional Presentation Guides, hole punched
- Students' Colonial Notebooks
- Overhead projector
- Colored construction paper piece labeled Colonists Ready to Sail to fill a cargo section in the hull of the bulletin board ship.

Preparations

(1) Have on hand and available for students to use as a resource for preparation for their regional presentation and completion of their regional guide the book titled Everyday Life: Colonial Times by Walter A. Hazen. A Good Year Book published by Addison-Wesley, ISBN # 0-673-36322-8.

(2) The cards described below should be printed on three different colors, two each of yellow, orange, and green. (In Associated File) You will have two yellow groups reporting out on the Southern Colonies, two orange groups on the Middle Colonies, and two green groups on the New England Colonies.

Print color-coded sheets of identity cards and cut them apart into individual cards for students to draw out of the basket.

(3) Create a colonial costume for yourself.

(4) Bring in any kind of a colonial looking crockery bowl, wooden bowl, or heavy basket in which students can't see the color of the cards.

(5) Bring in a colonial era type candlestick holder with candle.

(6) Arrange student desks into six groups of five or six desk per group. (See NOTE on #4 of Procedure.)

(7) Copy and hole punch for each student:
-Who I Am. . .Where I'm Going identification sheet (In Associated File)
- Historical Facts guide (In Associated File)
- Group Responsibility Assignment Sheet (In Associated File)
- Regional Presentation Guides (In Associated File)

8) Copy and make a transparency of the Group Journal Task (in Associated File).

(9) Gather together:
- Glue
- Sheets of colored construction paper to identify groups (these must correspond with the colors used to make the student identity cards)
- A chart tablet or sheets of chart paper for each of the six groups
- Maker for writing for each of the six groups
- Overhead projector
- Screen

(10) Students should have their Colonial Notebooks.

(11) Colored construction paper piece labeled Colonists Ready to Sail to fill a cargo section in the hull of the bulletin board ship.

Procedures

NOTE: This is the pivotal point of the Unit Plan: A Colony Is Born. Thus far, groundwork has been laid and students have acquired an array of resources that have been filed systematically into their notebooks, affording them the opportunity to develop organizational skills. This lesson will provide the following experiences:
- Have students learn how to utilize their Colonial Notebook as an informational resource,
- Build on and apply the knowledge learned thus far,
- Define the group work for which they will be responsibe for the duration of the rest of the unit, and
- Set parameters for the group presentation, which will be the culmination of their work.
This lesson uses journal writing as the transitional activity, as it will be a review of the journal writing lesson in Lesson 5, Dear Mem, and create for them an identity as a colonist.

NOTE: It would be best to have this lesson planned at a time in the school day when the students are just entering the classroom, possibly either first thing in the morning, after lunch, or after special area.

TIME NOTE: The suggested time allotment for this lesson is 90 minutes. If you are unable to manage a 90-minute block of time, it would be appropriate to follow steps # 1 - 10 at one sitting. Continue with steps # 11 - 16 at another time during the same day or the following day. If you choose to split this lesson into two different times, be sure to take students through a review of steps # 1 - 10 before beginning step # 11. A suggestion is to use the Learning Center Activity described after # 10 in the Procedures, as the review. Take special note of the suggestion that the journal entries be treated as separate writing lessons done during the Writing time of your day. (See #14 NOTE.) If this lesson is divided and done on two different days, realize you are extending the number of days it will take to complete the unit.

(1) You will need to be dressed up as a colonist of the 1600's. It would be very effective if you can get the room quite dark, and only have a lighted candle in a period candle holder in your hand as you speak. As students enter the classroom, explain: Today, each of you will become a colonist with your own reason for coming to the New World and a destination where you will settle. Much has happened in recent years. Roanoke lessons have been learned, Jamestown has finally emerged as a thriving colony, and the Pilgrims have celebrated their abundance by giving thanks. It is now your turn. You have decided that it is the best thing for you to come to the New World and begin a new life. Who you are, why you are coming to the New World, your occupation, and the region you will settle in, will be determined by the card you draw. Today our cargo, which will be added to our ship, is that of Colonists Ready to Sail.

(2) Hand out the Who I Am . . . Where I Am identification sheet to each child. (In Associated File) Explain to students the following things:
First, they will draw a card.
Secondly, once everyone has drawn, they will move to sit with others who have like card colors.
Next, everyone will paste their cards onto their identification sheets and place them in the Region of Focus section of their Colonial Notebooks.
Finally, they will be given a group task to perform.

(3) Walk around the room with the basket (or whatever) of cards letting each student draw one. (Boys draw from one, girls the other.)

(4) Once all students have selected a card, place a bottle of glue and lay a sheet of colored paper in each of the seating areas of the classroom. These colored sheets should match the colors used for the student cards and will only be there long enough for students to find their new location. NOTE: I would not attempt to move students every day. Instead, make this the new seating arrangement for the classroom, and the seat they take within their group will be their new seat assignment for the rest of the time spent on the unit.

(5) When all students are seated and in their regional groups, have them paste the cards onto the Who I Am . . .Where Am I Going sheets and file in their notebooks.

(6) TASK: Display the directions for their assignment on the overhead projector. (In Associated File) Read it aloud. Ask for questions. Clarify. As groups begin to discuss the contents of their journal entries, give each group a sheet or two of chart paper and a marker with which to write.

(7) As you move about the groups listening to the discussion, advising, questioning, and guiding, formatively assess student use of the Colonial Notebook as a resource. Be sure that each group selects a recorder who will be responsible for lettering the entries created by the thoughts and input of group members, and a reader who will present the entry to the rest of the class by reading it aloud.

(8) Each group writes their journal entries on the chart paper. They should be reminded to use the Journal Rubric, Rubric Expectations, and sample entries located in the Journal section of their notebooks as a guide.

(9) Next, groups will share their entries with the rest of the class. Class members will score each using the Journal Rubric. Positive feedback, as well as constructive suggestions, should be made about each.

(10) After all groups have had their journal entries assessed by the class, allow time for the groups to revise their entries according to suggestions made.

LEARNING CENTER ACTIVITY: Students can write into the Journal section of their notebooks a copy of their group's journal entry. This provides them with another exemplar of journals and gives them an opportunity to identify with the group by having in their notebooks a copy of what the group thought and created together.

(11) Hand out a Regional Presentation Guide to each student (in Associated File). Ask where they think this will be filed in their notebooks. (Region of Focus)

(12) Hand out a Historical Facts Guide to each student (in Associated File). Have them file in Region of Focus section.

(13) Explain to students: There is much to learn about the three different regions that were settled in the New World. In order for us to be able to learn as much as we can, each group will explore and become experts in the specifics of the region that they, as colonists, are settling. The Regional Guide helps you to focus on what the standards have required that we learn, as well as lead you through the research process. By using this guide effectively, you will have everything you'll need to present your region to the class and to have a completed Colonial Notebook from which you will be taking the summative assessment.

(14) Say: Let's take a walk through our Regional Guide: You will need to take time to do the following things. Explain to students what the group task for the next four days will be. Consult and go over with students Criteria for Cooperative Workers (in Associated File):
-Each student in the group is responsible for a portion of the presentation.
-Complete all required information on the Regional Guide.
-Sources can be the textbook, Web sites, pages from Everyday Life: Colonial Times, and others you may have.
-Create a colonial meal representative of the region.
-Create a township layout representative of the region.
Explain to students about the progressive journal entry requirement for each of them.
Review the rubric, expectations, personal insight, and historical facts to be included.
-The Historical Facts sheet is an organization tool to help them keep track of the historical happenings, or significant people they read about as they work on their regional presentation. It will be a good reference for them when writing their journals to be certain that they have included historical facts or made accurate reference to historical people of the era. (See attached file.)
-NOTE: Creating a successful colonial journal with all the required elements takes time. Quality writing takes time- more time than the last five minutes of a Social Studies lesson allows! To assure all students are given an opportunity at doing their best writing, it is highly recommended that the daily journal entries be treated as the class Writing Block, or writing lesson each day. Don't over task your time, your students' energy, or your energy by trying to squeeze into the day both a Social Studies journal and a separate writing lesson! Make your daily writing lesson an integrated part of what they are studying. It makes both the social studies and writing experiences purposeful, focused, and far more meaningful.
The reasons for having the colonial journal entry as each day's writing lesson rather than just as a requirement to do the last 5 minutes of the social studies period, is threefold. First, it gives the students more time during Social Studies to spend on researching their regions and doing a more in-depth complete job of the Regional Guide. Secondly, it would enhance students' writing abilities through providing more time for thinking, creating, using the rubric, scoring, teacher feedback, mini-lessons, revising, and sharing from the Author's Chair. Thirdly, it would be a means by which students would strengthen their learning of the selected Social Studies standards. It affords students the opportunity for evaluating, inventing, organizing, composing, predicting, pretending, imagining, visualizing, and expressing. Giving an adequate amount of time for the journal writing component of this unit provides a means by which the aspects of everyday life of colonial America can be better digested and synthesized, both of which are higher order thinking levels.
A well-balanced classroom includes writing each day. This is a great way to have your students writing within the discipline of Social Studies.

(15) Students will now have time to identify human and material resources necessary for the project, assign people needed for specific tasks, and organize the task into periods of time.

(16) As time is giving out, select a student to fill a cargo section with the labeled construction paper piece.

Assessments

These formative assessments lead to summatives at the end of the Unit Plan: A Colony Is Born.
Please note that as the Regional Presentation guides are to be used formatively, they are included in both the lesson plan attachments and the unit plan attachments.

The group generated journal entry will formatively assess the students' abilities .

For scoring, use journal rubric. (Available in the Unit Plan Assessments. See Extensions)
The process of creating the entry will formatively assess students' abilities.

FOR SCORING: To assess if students are successful and to what level, check the accuracy of incorporating within the written entry, historical facts, personal insight, and reasons for leaving as dictated by the journal rubric, and the students' ability to use their notebooks as a source for information to guide the contents of the entry.

The Notebook will formatively assess the students' abilities.

FOR SCORING: To assess if student is successful and to what level, check the notebook for accuracy of filing handouts within the proper section of the notebook, for handouts being in the correct order within the correct section, and to see if the notebook is utilized as a resource of information for creating the journal entry

The Group Task will formatively assess the students' abilities.

FOR SCORING: To assess if students are successful and to what level, check for the assignment to each student, in each group, a portion of the Regional Guide which they are responsible for in the presentation. Each group preparing their Group Task Form will measure this. Student names will be entered on the form, initialed by each student, reviewed by the teacher, and turned in.

Extensions

The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2962. Once you select the unitís link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

Thus far, groundwork has been laid, and students have acquired an array of resources that have been filed systematically into their notebooks, affording them the opportunity to develop organizational skills. This lesson will provide the following experiences:
- Have students learn how to utilize their Colonial Notebook as an informational resource
- Build on and apply the knowledge learned thus far
- Define the group work for which they will be responsible for the duration of the unit
- Set parameters for the group presentation, which will be the culmination of their work.
This lesson uses journal writing as the transitional activity, as it will be a review of the journal writing lesson in Lesson 5, Dear Mem, and create for them an identity as a colonist.

Extensions:

(1) LEARNING CENTER ACTIVITY: Students can write into the Journal section of their notebooks a copy of their group's journal entry. This provides them with another exemplar of journals and gives them an opportunity to identify with the group by having in their notebooks a copy of what the group thought and created together.

(2) Creating a successful colonial journal with all the required elements takes time. Quality writing takes time! More time than the last five minutes of a Social Studies lesson allows! To assure all students are given the best chance at doing their best, it is highly recommended that the writing of the daily journal entries be treated as the class Writing Block, or writing lesson each day. Don't over task your time, your students' energy, or your energy by trying to squeeze into the day both a Social Studies journal and a separate writing lesson! Make your daily writing lesson an integrated part of what they are studying. It makes both the social studies and writing experiences purposeful, focused, and far more meaningful.

(3) I think it would be a fabulous idea for the groups to actually serve a meal to themselves for the meal demonstration. If you have good parent participation and if parents are willing to bring in the prepared food on the specified day, the class could do it. The students could talk about the aspects of their regional meal to the class, then eat it as their lunch. Figure two groups per day presenting. Those two groups could stay in the room to eat their regional meal together, while the rest of the class went to the lunchroom to eat their lunch as usual. Do this three days in a row, with each group having the chance to eat their meal in the room.

Web Links

Web supplement for Lesson 6 -To Leave or Not to Leave
Colonial North America

Web supplement for Lesson 6 -To Leave or Not to Leave
Colonial America - Suite 101

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