Beacon Lesson Plan Library

What's in a Name? (Elementary School)

Cynthia Youngblood
Santa Rosa District Schools

Description

Using a quote from Shakespeare's [Romeo and Juliet], the student creates a flower that illustrates himself or herself using scraps of colored paper and markers. In an informal presentation, students share how their flowers represent them.

Objectives

The student determines the main idea or essential message in a text and identifies relevant details and facts and patterns of organization.

The student demonstrates an awareness of the difference between the use of English in formal and informal settings.

The student responds to a work of literature by interpreting selected phrases, sentences, or passages and applying the information to personal life.

Materials

-Classroom copies of play [Romeo and Juliet] by William Shakespeare
-Construction paper
-Tissue paper
-Construction paper
-Scraps of wallpaper
-Scraps of fabric
-Glitter
-Markers
-Pens

Preparations

1. Make a garden-like bulletin board for students’ flowers.

2. Make a model flower for yourself.

Procedures

1. Have the class read and study William Shakespeare’s [Romeo and Juliet].

2. Re-read quote spoken by Juliet in Act II, scene 2, line 43:
“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.”

3. Lead a class discussion about what the quote means. (Juliet argues that the name of something does not affect its essence. The analogy associates Romeo with the rose, a symbol of love and beauty.)

4. To enhance the understanding of the quote, ask the student to create a flower that represents himself or herself. (For example, a student who plays basketball might have a basketball as the center of the flower.) Show class her or his model flower and tells why he/she has created this flower and what it conveys about her or him.

5. In an informal presentation, students show and share how their flowers represent them.

6. Have each student place his or her flower in a garden-like bulletin board.

7. Evaluate the project, giving 50% of the grade for the flower and 50% of the grade for the informal presentation.

Assessments

Evaluate the project, giving 50% of the grade for the flower and 50% of the grade for the informal presentation. Evaluate the project to see if the student determined the main idea or essential message of the quote, the student demonstrated an awareness of the difference between the use of English in formal and informal settings, and the student responded to a work of literature by interpreting a selected passage and applying the information to personal life.
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