Beacon Lesson Plan Library

You Wouldn't Understand...It's a Slang Thang

Lainie Ferrell

Description

This lesson is designed to introduce students to the social life of the Roaring Twenties thru slang terms. NOTE: Can be adapted to any decade(see extra attachments)

Objectives

The student understands social transformations that took place in the 1920's and 1930's, the principal political and economic factors that led to the Great Depression, and the legacy of the Depression in American society.

Materials

-One copy each of letter (see attachment) and 1920s Slang Dictionary (see weblink) for each student
-pencil/pen for each student
-paper for each student

Preparations

-Make each student a copy of the letter with slang terms from 1920s. (see attachment)
-Access the 1920s slang dictionary online with the weblink listed below, print out and make one copy for each student.
-Make each student a copy of the checklist used for assessment. (see attachment)

Procedures

NOTE: BEFORE TEACHING THIS LESSON, IT IS ASSUMED THAT STUDENTS HAVE PRIOR KNOWLEDGE OF THE VICTORIAN ERA AND THE ADVANCES WOMEN HAVE MADE FROM THE 1880S-1920S.

DAY ONE
1. Announce to students that today they will be traveling back in time to the Roaring Twenties where they will learn more about the culture of the decade using the language of that era. Tell them that they will then use the information that they will learn to help them compare and contrast 1880 society with that of the 1920s.

2. Pass out copies of friendly letter(see attachment) incorporating 1920s slang.

3. Allow students to work in pairs to decipher and rewrite the letter using modern language. (20-25 minutes)

4. Give time in class for students to share their interpretations of the letter.

5. Follow with a discussion of how each generation has its own "slang" and allow students to share examples from their own generation.

6. Pass out 1920's slang dictionary (see weblink)and as a class decipher the letter passed out at the beginning of the period.

DAY TWO
1. Review the lesson from Day One

2. Tell students to get out the copy of the 1920's dictionary of slang terms they were given the day before.

3. Pass out a copy of the checklist being used for assessment.

4. In order to assess their understanding of how society has been transformed since the Victorian Age, tell students that they will, in small groups (2-3)and using the slang language of the 1920s, write a letter from a flapper girl to her grandmother where she discusses how the times have changed, and compares the expectations of a young woman of the 1920s with that of generations past.

5. Review the checklist used for assessment with the class so that they will understand what to include.

Assessments

Working cooperatively in small groups (2-3 students), formatively assess the student's ability to show an understanding of the social transformations that took place in the 1920s.

To be acceptable, the letter should:
-follow the appropriate format for a friendly letter, including an opening (to grandmother), body and closing (from flapper).
-correctly incorporate at least 25 slang terms taken from the 1920s Slang Dictionary (see weblink)
-discuss three specific changes that have taken place since the 1880s that have had a significant impact on the 1920s.


To be commendable, the letter should:
-follow the appropriate format for a friendly letter, including an opening (to grandmother), body and closing (from flapper).
-correctly use 18-24 slang terms taken from the 1920s Slang Dictionary (see weblink)
-discuss two specific changes that have taken place since the 1880s that have had a significant impact on the 1920s.

Extensions

-Students can trade the letters they have written and decipher their meanings with modern language.

-Students can create a caricature of a man or woman from the 1920s labeling the caricature with slang terms to identify what is shown

Web Links

1920's Slang Dictionary
Potpourri: Slang of the 1920s

Attached Files

1920's Letter     File Extension: pdf

Letter Assessment Checklist     File Extension: pdf

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