Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Leaps and Dives: Is it Odd or Even?

Tara Ply

Description

Inspired by some fun dolphin characters, second graders use a diagram to demonstrate and explain even and odd numbers.

Objectives

The student demonstrates and explains the difference between odd and even numbers using concrete objects or drawings.

Materials

-Lesson Page 1 (“Leaps and Dives” diagram activity page)
-Blue and Green Crayons
-Blue and Green Transparency Pens
-Projector Erase Wipes or Baby Wipes
-Overhead projector and screen
-Electrical source for overhead projector
-Transparency 1 (a blank “Leaps and Dives” diagram)
-Prepared Picture Card 1 and Picture Card 2 (Dolphin Cards)

Preparations

1. Download and duplicate 1 copy of Lesson Page 1 for each child in your class.
2. Download Transparency 1 and duplicate 1 copy on transparency medium.
3. Prepare overhead projector area and screen. Gather blue and green ink transparency pens and erasing wipes.
4. Download and duplicate 1 copy of Picture Card 1 and Picture Card 2 and print on heavy card stock. You may wish to have these laminated for future use.


Procedures

Note: This lesson is part of a series of lessons related to number sense and skip counting. Students have already worked with even and odd numbers in previous lessons.

1. Begin the lesson by reviewing what makes a number even and what makes a number odd.

2. Initiate a discussion of ways even and odd numbers are found in our world (i.e. pairs of socks when doing the laundry, etc.).

3. Explain to the class that today they will be using a special “Leaps and Dives” diagram to find out whether a number is even or odd.

4. Display Picture Card 1 to the class. Tell them “This is Even Steven the Dolphin. He loves to dive under the ocean every day”. Go on to display Picture Card 2 to the class. Tell them “This is Rodd Odd the Dolphin. He loves to leap over the ocean every day. These two dolphins are going to help us learn about even and odd numbers.

5. Dim the lights and turn on the overhead projector to project Transparency 1 (see Associated File) on the screen and direct students to look at the projected image.

6. Explain to the class that this is a “Leaps and Dives” diagram. Tell the class that Steven and Rodd always take turns leaping and diving, and that Rodd Odd always goes first. Draw one green ink “leap” (a vertically convex semicircle) between Dot 0 and Dot 1 on the diagram. Tell the class, “Here is Rodd’s odd leap.” Next, draw one blue ink “dive” (a vertically concave semicircle) between Dot 1 and Dot 2 on the diagram. Tell the class, “Here is Steven’s even dive.”

7. Tell the class that they will now be using leaps and dives to diagram the number 7 to determine whether it is even or odd. Explain to them that the last leap or dive shows whether the number is even or odd. If it is even, then the last mark will be a dive. If it is odd, the last number will be a leap.

8. As students watch, draw the leaps and dives in the appropriate ink colors until Dot 7 is reached. Call on a student to tell whether the last mark represents a leap or dive, and to state whether the number is even or odd.

9. Erase the transparency. Repeat the process for several other sample numbers.
Call on several children for responses and observe during the discussion to determine whether or not students can correctly explain the difference between an even or odd number on the diagram.

10. Leaving the projector image on the screen, turn up the lights and tell the class they will now use what they have learned to make their own “Leaps and Dives” diagram.

11. Tell the children to take out a blue crayon and a green crayon and a pencil. Distribute a copy of Lesson Page 1 (see Associated File) to each child and ask them to look at the “Leaps and Dives” diagram on Sample A. Discuss the sample diagram with the class and do the sample problem together, observing to make sure children record their answers properly on their own papers. Tell the children they will be completing some more “Leaps and Dives” diagrams on their own to demonstrate the difference between even or odd numbers and to explain whether the numbers they are given are even or odd by completing the sentence that follows each problem.

12. Give the students time to work independently, circulating as needed to assist and provide direction for low-performing students. Make observations of any difficulties students are experiencing, noting which children may need reteaching at the end of the lesson.

13. When students have had time to complete Lesson Page 1 (see Associated File), lead a discussion of the data collected and displayed before collecting Lesson Pages 1 (see Associated File) for formative evaluation. Crayons and pencils may be put away as needed.

Assessments

The teacher observes during the whole group activity to determine whether or not students can correctly create and use the “Leaps and Dives” diagram to determine whether a number is even or odd.
Formatively evaluate the “Leaps and Dives” diagrams produced by the student during the independent work portion of the lesson to determine whether or not the student correctly completed the “Leaps and Dives” diagrams on Lesson Page 1 (see Associated Files), accurately identified the numbers as even or odd, and labeled them as such. This is a low stakes assessment for information gathering purposes only.
Formatively evaluate the students’ answers to the questions on Lesson Page 1 (see associated files) to determine whether or not the student correctly drew the “Leaps and Dives” diagrams for each number to provide answers to the questions listed on the page.
Follow up with small-group reteaching sessions for any students who demonstrated incomplete knowledge of lesson concepts. Those students will then be given an additional opportunity to demonstrate progress prior to any summative assessment taking place.

Extensions

1. You may wish for students to work with other even or odd numbers on a “Leaps and Dives” diagram activity in classroom centers.
2. You may choose to have students work with even and odd numbers activities using manipulatives in a classroom center.

Web Links

This online game has students identify even and odd numbers to do chores on a farm.
Bobber's Farm

This online game has students “blast” even numbered ghosts.
Ghost Blasters Even

This online game has students “blast” odd numbered ghosts.
Ghost Blasters Odd

Attached Files

Leaps and Dives: Is it Odd or Even? Lesson Page 1     File Extension: pdf

Leaps and Dives: Is it Odd or Even Picture Card 1     File Extension: pdf

Leaps and Dives: Is it Odd or Even? Picture Card 2     File Extension: pdf

Leaps and DIves: Is it Odd or Even? Transparency 1     File Extension: pdf

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