Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Butterflies and Frogs

Sandi King
Bay District Schools

Description

This is the fifth lesson in the unit plan, Patterns, Patterns Everywhere. Included in this lesson are activities for days 6 and 7. Students identify patterns found in nature.

Objectives

The student understands that continuous patterns occur in nature (for example, seasons, phases of the Moon, blooming flowers).

Materials

-Carle, Eric. [The Very Hungry Caterpillar]. New York. Scholastic Books, 1969.
-Graphics of nature patterns downloaded from the associated files
-Willet, Marcus. "Penguins Are My Favorite Sort of Frog" (song), The Wright Group. Bothell, WA, 1994.
-Nature Pattens worksheet downloadable from the associated file
-Gibbons, Gail. [The Seasons of Arnold's Apple Tree]. New York. Scholastic, 1985.
-A variety of manipulatives that could be used to create patterns
-Recording of the book [Brown Bear, Brown, Bear]
Martin, Bill, Jr. New York. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1967.
-Recording of the book [Green Eggs and Ham] by Dr. Seuss. New York. Random House, 1960.
- Kent, Jack. [The Caterpillar and the Polliwog]. New York. Aladdin Paperbacks, 1985.
-Cassette recorder and headphones for the language center.
-Summative Assessment 3, Patterns in Nature
-Summative Assessment 4, Patterns, Patterns Everywhere

Preparations

1. Locate and preview the book [The Very Hungry Caterpillar].

2. Download and print the graphic of nature patterns from the attached files for sharing with the class. Overhead transparencies or class charts can be made of these graphics.

3. Locate and preview the song "Penguins Are My Favorite Sort of Frog". Make a class chart of this song.

4. Download and dupicate the Nature Patterns worksheet from the attached file.

5. Locate and preview the book [The Seasons of Arnold's Apple Tree].

6. Gather a variety of manipulatives that could be used to create patterns. A selection should be available in the math center, as well as to cooperative groups.

7. Locate or record an audio version of the book [Brown Bear, Brown Bear] and [Green Eggs and Ham]. Have headphones available for the language center using this recording.

8. Download and duplicate the Summative Assessment 3, Patterns in Nature, from the unit's associated files. Each student needs a copy.

9. In case of rain, pre-select pictures of nature patterns to give the students. Remember to have enough for small groups or individual students.

10. Locate and preview the book [The Caterpillar and the Polliwog].

11. Download and duplicate the Summative Assessment 4, Patterns, Patterns Everywhere, from the unit's associated files. Each student needs a copy.

Procedures

Day 6 of the unit plan, Patterns, Patterns Everywhere

1. Orally review the definition of a pattern. Select students to demonstrate various types of patterns OR create some of your own choosing. Be sure to include sounds, objects, and oral language, especially if students seem stuck on a certain type of pattern, such as color. Select students to extend patterns created by classmates. This review can also serve as a formative assessment with affirmative and corrective feedback given.

2. During whole group time, read [The Very Hungry Caterpillar] by Eric Carle. Question the students as to any patterns they may have noticed in the story. Direct the discussion to discovery of patterns in the life cycle of a butterfly. Be sure to give examples and non-examples to strengthen students'pattern detective skills.

3. Share the graphics attached to this lesson plan that depict the life cycle of a frog, the four seasons, and the water cycle. These graphics can be shared via computer screen, overhead transparency, or charts. Challenge students to think of other patterns in nature. Included could be day and night, waves rolling in and out, growing a tree from seed to tree which produces a seed. Record all patterns suggested and let the pattern detectives determine whether they are actually patterns. The test is, “Does it always repeat itself the same way?” Students predict the next element of the pattern as part of the detective's test.

4. Sing the song “Penguins Are My Favorite Sort of Frogs” by Jim Valley. Have the pattern detectives identify patterns in the song. These could be oral language patterns, repetitions, or rhythms. These could also be nature patterns, such as life cycles. Have the pattern detectives determine whether each suggested pattern is actually a pattern.

5. Now that various patterns in nature have been detected, model how a pattern in nature could be transferred to a different medium, for instance, a seed, the seed grows to a plant, blooms, drops seeds could be a dance movement starting low, rising slowly, outstretched arms, shaking fingers. Be sure the same movements are repeated in the same order to be a pattern.

6. During center time, students complete the worksheet Nature Patterns available from the associated files. If the student's coordination is not yet developed to the level of completing this worksheet, the teacher can draw the lines as the student dictates the desired response. This will be added to the student’s pattern book as page number four of six, and also be used as a formative assessment of the student’s understanding of the patterns in nature. Be sure to give affirmative and corrective feedback. Affirmative feedback should verbally restate the attributes of the pattern with praise added for successful completion. Restating the attributes helps cement the concept in the student's mind. Corrective feedback should be a guide for the student to discover the mistake and make corrections. Teachers should lead the verbalizing of the the attributes of the patterns and then guide the student to predict the next piece of the pattern.

7. The math center and language arts center still include pattern-creating experiences.

Day 7 of the unit plan, Patterns, Patterns Everywhere

1. Orally review the definition of a pattern. Select students to demonstrate various types of patterns. Be sure to include sounds, objects, nature patterns and oral language. Select students to extend patterns created by classmates. Have students transfer another student’s pattern into a different medium, such as clapping or movement. Students should verbalize the attributes of the pattern and the reason for their predictions before extending the patterns. Look for successful attribute explanations. Students should also verbalize their transfers to a different medium. Be sure the students understand the pattern. This review should also serve as a formative assessment with affirmative and corrective feedback given. As the teacher restates the attributes of the patterns in the affirmative feedback, all students will benefit from the extended explanation. Corrective feedback should be a guide to assist the student in discovering the pattern and its attributes.

2. Read [The Seasons of Arnold's Apple Tree] by Gail Gibbons. Have the pattern detectives identify patterns in the story. These could be oral language patterns, repetitions, or rhythms. Advanced students may even notice patterns of how the words and illustrations are placed on the pages. Have the pattern detectives determine whether each suggested pattern is actually a pattern.

3. Take a nature walk and have the pattern detectives find patterns. These could be patterns in the way the sidewalk is laid, patterns in the way chairs are stacked, patterns in the way children sit at lunch. Record all suggested patterns. Have the students give an explanation as to why this would be a pattern and record this explanation. Have a team of pattern detectives determine whether the suggested pattern is actually a pattern and record the explanation. To further their understanding of nature patterns, ask the students to classify the patterns they found as either man-made or nature.

4. Upon returning to the class, share the various patterns identified. Use your recorded information to remind students of the patterns they suggested and the reasons they gave. Give students an opportunity to state that this is an example or a non- example. Have pattern detectives confirm the pattern. Assist any student that needs to save face by helping that student identify the pattern as a non-example. Record each nature pattern on a class chart. Be sure to repeat the pattern in your model. This is in preparation for the assessment that will be administered later in the day. Students should know that they will be expected to draw a nature pattern similar to yours to show what they have learned.

5. During math center, students continue to manipulate objects to create, predict, and extend patterns.

6. During language center, students listen to a recording of [Brown Bear, Brown Bear] by Bill Martin. Students use their understanding of the pattern in the book to create one page following the pattern. Individual pages will be combined to form a class book following the same pattern as [Brown Bear, Brown Bear].

7. During science center, have students draw a nature pattern of their choice on drawing paper or on the form available in the unit assessments. Be sure that the pattern is repeated. This is the fifth document to be added to the individual pattern book. The drawing will be used for Summative Assessment #3.

Day 8 of the unit plan, Patterns, Patterns Everywhere

Review:
This is a review day in preparation for the final summative assessment that will be completed tomorrow. Teacher should acquaint the students with all items on the Summative Assessment #4. Model examples of the expected response.

1. During whole group time, read [The Caterpillar and the Pollywog] by Jack Kent. Assign some students as pattern detectives to find and share patterns in the book. Assign other students to be the pattern checkers whose job it is to check the pattern found by the detectives to make sure it is a pattern. Both the detective and the checker must verbalize their reasoning for it being or not being a pattern. Because this is student originated, examples and non-examples will be presented. For non-examples, it is important that you give corrective feedback. Allowing a detective who shares a non-example to manipulate the example so that it being a pattern will help cement understanding. For example, if a detective says that a butterfly is a pattern, lead the student to the conclusion that one butterfly is not a pattern unless it lands on a flower, then flies, then lands on a flower, then flies, etc. Something about the butterfly must demonstrate a pattern. In leading the student to transfer the non-example into an example not only allows the students to “save face” but also actually lets the student show off how smart they are while cementing the concepts.

2. During language arts center, students listen to a recording of [Green Eggs and Ham] by Dr. Seuss. Students will recite the repeating pattern.

3. During math center, students are given various counters and blocks with instructions to build a pattern. Then see who can be a detective and figure out the pattern.

4. During whole group, students sit in a circle and take turns creating a pattern, either by movement, sounds, or using manipulatives. Other students will identify the pattern, extend it, or transfer it to a different medium. Since this is review day, all student participation must be formatively assessed and include both affirmative and corrective feedback.

5. After this day of review, students should be prepared for the final summative assessment, Summative Assessment 4, Patterns, Patterns Everywhere to be given tomorrow.

Assessments

Formative assessments should be conducted throughout these activities. Students learn from affirmative and corrective feedback. For further details see day 6, step #6 in Procedures and day 7, step #7 in Procedures.

Summative Assessment 3, Nature Patterns is available from the unit's associated file.

Extensions

The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2953. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

Other books that would enhance the understanding of patterns in nature:
-Krauss, Ruth. [The Carrot Seed]. NY. Harper Row, 1945.
-Gibbons, Gail. [From Seed to Plant]. NY. Holiday House. 1991.
-Carle, Eric. [The Tiny Seed]. Saxonville, MA. Picture Book Studio, LTD., 1997.
-Lionni, Leo. [A Busy Year]. NY. Scholastic, 1992.
-Maestro, Betsy. [How Do Apples Grow?]. NY. Scholastic, 1992.
-Gibbons, Gail. [The Reason for Seasons]. NY. Scholastic, 1995.
Kent, Jack. [The Caterpillar and the Pollywog]. NY. Simon & Schuster Books, 1982.
Kellogg, Steven. [The Mysterious Tadpole]. NY. Dial Books for Young Readers, 1977.

Attached Files

Graphic examples of patterns in nature and Nature Patterns worksheet     File Extension: pdf

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