Beacon Lesson Plan Library

My! What a Sky!

Patti Hurd
Santa Rosa District Schools

Description

What objects do you usually see in the day and night skies? Sing a song, share a book and look at objects in the day and night skies. Then students will be able to differentiate objects as seen in the day and night sky.

Objectives

The student knows and differentiates objects seen in the day and night sky (for example, clouds, Sun, stars, Moon, planets).

Materials

- Brown, Margaret Wise. [Good Night Moon.] New York: Harper & Row, 1947.
- Stone, Lynn M. [Day And Night.] Vero Beach: Rourke Publishing, 1994.
-Song chart from associated files
-Assessment checklist from associated files
-Commercial cutouts of the sun, moon, stars, planets, and clouds
-Paper for illustrating day and night sky
-Crayons
-Pictures of the day sky and the night sky for teacher use during individual assessments
-Chart tablet

Preparations

1. Gather necessary materials and supplies.
2. Use chart paper to make a copy of the [Day and Night Sky] song.
3. Purchase cutouts of the day and night skies.
4. Create picture of the night sky and the day sky for teacher use during individual assessments.
5. Print associated files.

Procedures

1. Ask students if they have ever seen the sun shine during the night.

2. Read book (such as [Day And Night] by Lynn M. Stone or [Good Night Moon] by Margaret Wise Brown) that introduces day and night. Discuss book and ask students what they see in the day and night skies.

3. Show students song chart and tell them the song will help them learn what is in the day sky and in the night sky. See associated file.

4. Say each line of the song with students repeating the lines.

5. Tell students the tune of the song.

6. Sing song. Point to each word as it is sung.

7. Tell students that you want them to be able to identify objects as belonging in the night sky or in the day sky. Show students cutouts of a star, moon, sun, cloud and planets. Ask students to identify the cutouts and indicate if they are seen mostly in the day or night sky. Clarify misconceptions. Allow for discussion.

8. Pass out papers (folded in half) for illustrating pictures of the day and night sky. Model drawing a picture of the day sky and the night sky with objects drawn in the correct sky.

9. Display illustrations of the day and night sky.

Assessments

The student differentiates objects seen in the day and night sky by drawing two pictures.
One picture is of the day sky.
The other picture is of the night sky.
Each picture will contain two objects seen in the day sky and in the night sky.
Record results on a teacher checklist.
Student sorts and verbally identifies two objects seen in the day sky and two objects seen in the night sky.
Record results on a teacher checklist as student sorts and verbally identifies picture cards.
Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.