Beacon Lesson Plan Library

I Love Navarre

Regan Lee

Description

The Navarre Beach area (or your area) is growing rapidly. The Chamber of Commerce wants help in creating a brochure for families with middle-school students who may be moving to our area. Students engage in a project-based lesson to provide the needed information. Note: This lesson deals with using appropriate formats, presenting the brochure as one type of persuasive format. This lesson deals with producing final documents that have been edited for correct spelling and punctuation. Students should have had prior experience and instruction in editing.

Objectives

The student produces final documents that have been edited for-correct spelling;-correct punctuation, including commas, colons, and semicolons;-correct common usage, including subject/verb agreement, common noun/pronoun agreement, common possessive forms, and with a variety of sentence structures,including parallel structure; and-correct formatting.

The student selects and uses appropriate formats for writing, including narrative, persuasive, and expository formats, according to the intended audience, purpose, and occasion.

The student uses electronic technology including databases and software to gather information and communicate new knowledge.

Materials

-Sample brochures from towns, cities, companies, etc.
-Internet access for class
-Library access for class
-Maps, atlases, phone books, and other reference materials
-Copies of Research Checklist (See Associated File)
-Copies of blank Brochure Data List and Rubric (See Associated File)
-White computer paper for draft
-Card Stock for groups
-Colored pencils and markers
-Computer programs with brochure template (optional)
- Computer graphics and images (optional)
- Scissors
- Glue

Preparations

1. Gather sample brochures to show as examples.
2. Gather research materials for students. (See Materials.)
3. Download and preview the Research Checklist. (See Associated Files.) Reproduce one copy for each student.
4. Download and preview the blank Brochure Data List and Rubric. (See Associated Files.) Reproduce one copy for each student.
5. Set up a date to use the school library or computer lab.
6. Optional: Find computer software programs that contain brochure template and/or clip art.


Procedures

Note: This lesson deals with using appropriate formats, presenting the brochure as one type of persuasive format. This lesson deals with producing final documents that have been edited for correct spelling and punctuation. Students should have had prior experience and instruction in editing.

1. Ask students what kind of writing would be used in a brochure. Review elements of persuasive writing. Show students sample brochures that you have collected. Discuss the reasons for brochures, eliciting that a brochure can be a document used to persuade.

2. Tell students the task: The Navarre Beach area is growing rapidly. The Navarre Beach Area Chamber of Commerce (your local Chamber of Commerce) has asked for your help with their relocation packets. Your job is to create a brochure for families with middle-school students who might be moving to our area. The brochure will highlight important and interesting points about the Navarre Beach area and will persuade the reader to relocate to the area.

3. Arrange students in small groups (three to four students). Have students brainstorm in their groups what they know about the Navarre area (your area). Tell one student to record information. Walk around the room and make sure that groups are providing good discussion. Provide feedback as necessary.

4. Hand out Research Checklist. (See Associated File.) Review research methods. Take students to library or computer lab. Provide students with research material on the Navarre area (your local area), including a Florida Atlas, local maps, local phone books, etc. Assign one to two of the group members to research books. Have one to two students from the group use the Internet to research the Navarre area. After twenty minutes, have students switch places to ensure that all students use Internet resources. (If you have enough computers for all students, have all students do on-line research at one time.) Have students fill out Research Checklist. (See Associated File.) Observe students as they research and provide students with feedback and encouragement.

5. Have students go back to groups and discuss their Research Checklist.

6. Hand out blank Brochure Data List and Brochure Rubric. (See Associated File.) Go over rubric with students and discuss each area of assessment.

7. Have students brainstorm what they think is most important to include in the brochure and discuss within their group. Have students generate the categories that they think should be included on their Brochure Data List. Walk around to groups and provide feedback and encouragement.

8. Distribute computer paper to use as a draft. Show students how to fold paper like a letter (in three parts). Have students brainstorm how they want their brochure to look and create a draft of their brochure. (A sample Brochure Data List and Rubric is provided in the Associated File.)

9. Review basic punctuation rules, especially targeting those students who have had difficulty with previous writing assignments.

10. Provide ample time for students to use Brochure Data List and Brochure Rubric to make changes to their draft brochure and look for errors in spelling and punctuation. Remind students to use a dictionary or thesaurus in their editing.

11. Have each group use its Brochure Data List and Rubric to assess its own brochure. Provide ample time for group discussion and revision.

12. Have each group switch brochures and Brochure Data List and Rubrics with another group and use the data list and rubric to peer assess. Have students pass brochures back to creators. Provide ample time for group discussion and revision.

13. Pass out card stock for students to create their final brochure. Provide ample time for students to create their final brochure. Make sure that all students are contributing to the final brochure. You can assign one person do write the text, one person to illustrate, etc. Another option is to have each student create one section of the brochure. While one student is working on the final draft, other group members will be looking over the rough draft of their section.

14. Collect brochures and its groupís Brochure Data List and Rubric. Use Brochure Data List and Rubric to formatively assess brochure.

Assessments

Evidence:
Students research their local area and complete a research checklist. Then, students work in a small group of three to four to create a brochure for other students who are relocating to the Navarre (your hometown) area.


Criteria for Checklist:
Formatively assess each studentís ability to use electronic technology to gather information by providing feedback on his/her Research Checklist. (See Associated File: Research Checklist.)

Criteria for Brochure:
Use rubric to formatively assess each studentís ability to apply research into brochure format and ability to persuade targeted audience to move to the student's hometown. (See Associated Files: I Love Navarre Brochure Data List and Brochure Rubric.)

Note: This lesson addresses USING appropriate formats, presenting the brochure as one type of persuasive format. This lesson deals with producing final documents that have been edited for correct spelling and punctuation. Students should have had prior experience and instruction in editing.

Extensions

Have a contest where students vote on the best brochure in each of your Language Arts classes. Send winning brochures from each class to the Navarre Beach Area Chamber of Commerce (your local Chamber of Commerce).

Attached Files

Research Checklist.†††††File Extension: pdf

Brochure Data List and Rubric.†††††File Extension: pdf

Blank Brochure Data List and Rubric.†††††File Extension: pdf

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