Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Holocaust Nightmare Revisited

Suzanne Kruger
Okaloosa County Schools

Description

Imagine living through the horrors of the Holocaust and having these memories return years later through writing a book! After reading the autobiography [Night], students determine why Elie Wiesel was willing to relive this time of his life through writing.

Objectives

The student determines the author's purpose and point of view and their effects on the text.

Materials

-Copy of [Night] book for each student
- 5x8 Index card for each student
-Copy of rubric for each student (see associated file)
-Copy of former studentís essay

Preparations

1. Devise a rubric and make three copies for each student. (see associated file)
2. Record steps of process on the marker board.
3. Attain index cards.
4. Decide on pairs to be used for optimal performance.
5. Attain a former studentís essay for modeling.


Procedures

Note: This lesson addresses only the author’s purpose for writing and its effect on the text.
Students have prior experience with determining author’s purpose.
Students have completed reading the book [Night].

Day One

1. Orally review the skill by asking students to brainstorm what they recall about determining author’s purpose.

2. Record their ideas on the marker board for easy access by all students.

3. Hand out [Night] books.

4. Hand out copies of assessment rubric and discuss.

5. Hand out index cards and inform students that the card will be used for their pre-writing brainstorming.

6. Point out steps of activity written on the marker board as oral directions are also given.

7. Consistently circulate around the class to offer feedback as the students progress through the various steps of the lesson.

8. Students determine Elie Wiesel’s purpose for writing the book.

9. Students record their proposed purpose for writing on the index card.

10. Students determine how his purpose for writing affects his style of writing and the content of his book.

11. Students record how his purpose for writing affects his style of writing on the index card.

12. Students review the book and identify a minimum of five details to support their proposed purpose for writing.

13. Students record their supporting details on their index card.

14. Students place their index card and rubric in their [Night] folder for tomorrow.

Day Two

1. Students retrieve their index cards and rubrics from their folders.

2. Review the pre-writing steps orally while referring to written instructions.

3. Review the process of a think-pair-share activity.

4. Divide students into pairs to complete a think-pair-share activity.
a. Students review each other’s pre-writing information for requirements, as presented on the rubric.
b. Students make suggestions as to possible improvements.

Day Three

1. Review previous day’s activities.

2. Provide students with a copy of a former student’s essay.

3. Read a former student’s essay to provide a model of the activity.

4. Students complete first draft and submit to teacher for correlation to the rubric.

Day Four

1. Review previous day’s activities.

2. Return copies of first draft with attached completed rubric.

3. Students review completed rubric and write final draft.

4. Students submit final draft to teacher for correlation to the rubric.

Day Five

1. Review previous day’s activities.

2. Return final drafts with completed rubric to the students.

3. Read examples of essays showing best practice.


Assessments

Note: This lesson assesses only the author’s purpose for writing and its effect on the text.

Students complete an essay covering Elie Wiesel’s purpose for writing the book [Night]. Students also discuss how his purpose for writing affected the manner in which he wrote
the book.
1. Determine and state the author’s purpose for writing.
2. Determine and state how his purpose for writing affected the content of his book.
3. Provide a minimum of five specific details from the book supporting his purpose for writing.

The Author’s Purpose rubric in the associated file includes the criteria for successful performance.

Extensions

1. Read Elie Wiesel’s book [Dawn], which was written many years later and discusses his reactions to the Holocaust as an adult.
2. Compare and contrast his purpose for writing each book.
ESOL or ESE Modifications:
1. Listen to an audio tape of the book either in English or in the student’s native language.
2. Allow the student to do an oral report rather than requiring a written essay.
3. Partner ESE or ESOL students with more proficient students for proper modeling.
4. Allow students with written language deficits to use a computer to complete the essay.
5. Allow additional time to complete assignment as designated on the student’s IEP or EP.


Attached Files

Author's Purpose Rubric     File Extension: pdf

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