Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Looking for More Clues

Lisa Ove Gibson
Bay District Schools

Description

Students review how to display collected data on bar and circle graphs.

Objectives

The student writes notes, comments, and observations that reflect comprehension of fifth-grade or higher level content and experiences from a variety of media.

The student knows which types of graphs are appropriate for different kinds of data (for example, bar graphs, line, or circle graphs).

The student chooses reasonable titles, labels, scales and intervals for organizing data on graphs.

The student generates questions, collects responses, and displays data on a graph.

The student interprets and completes circle graphs using common fractions or percents.

The student analyzes and explains orally or in writing the implications of graphed data.

The student uses range and measures of central tendency in real-world situations.

The student creates an appropriate graph to display data, including titles, labels, scales, and intervals.

The student interprets the results using statistics (range and measures of central tendency).

Materials

The following site is a Student Web Lesson found on the Beacon site. Using it is optional.
Students use range, mean, median, and mode.
All That Data
http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3105

-Access to a computer lab or a single computer with presentation capabilities and Internet access
-Data Detective Diary (used throughout the unit Data, Detectives, and Decisions)
-Short-Answer Question Rubric (see associated file – Pg. 1)
-Data Display Checklist (see associated file – Pg. 2)
-Excerpt from Diagnostic Assessment #2 (see associated file – Pgs. 3 - 6)
-Printable Version of the Student Web Lesson, All That Data! (see associated file Pgs. 7 – 12)
-Chart paper/writing device
-Results from the student conducted survey of 5th grade students asking, How much time should the average fifth-grade student spend on homework to make good grades?
-Classroom textbook

Preparations

1. Set up a presentation cart (with computer/television) and/or a computer lab to accommodate the Online Student Web Lessons referenced in the Materials section of this lesson.

2. Review the Student Web Lesson, All That Data! prior to instruction. See the Materials section of this document for the correct Web address.

3. Prepare a large writing space in the front of the classroom to record comments/ideas generated during today's discussion (obtain appropriate writing tools).

4. Copy the Printable Version of the Student Web Lesson, All That Data! (see associated file) for each student.

5. Decide how you will use Student Activity – Using Statistics to Uncover more Evidence in the associated file. Options include, but are not limited to: administering a copy to each student for their organization or not using Student Activity – Using Statistics to Uncover more Evidence in any way.

6. Collect and provide individual feedback to students regarding their answers to the Printable Version of the Student Web Lesson, All That Data!

7. Prepare a mini-lesson on how to complete circle graphs using common fractions. Also, discuss why line graphs would not be appropriate for the kinds of data collected in this survey. For an instructional model for these graphs use the Excerpt from Diagnostic Assessment #2 (see associated file).

8. Select appropriate pages out of your classroom text to allow extra practice for creating double bar and circle graphs. Also provide practice pages for using common fractions in circle graphs.

9. Copy and distribute the Data Display Checklist for each student to use after they have completed their group graphs. This checklist should remind students to include appropriate titles, labels, scales, and intervals for each graph? Is the data accurately graphed? What score would their written responses receive according to the Short-Answer Question Rubric?

Procedures

Disclaimer: The student interprets and completes circle graphs using common fractions or percents, students will not use percents in this lesson.

1. Review the correct answers from the previous day's lesson with students - Observing the Evidence. In this homework assignment, students practiced using stem-and-leaf plots to find the range, mean, median, and mode.

2. Distribute Printable Version of the Student Web Lesson, All That Data! (see associated file) to each student.

3. Instruct students to write their responses on their copies of the Printable Version of the Student Web Lesson, All That Data! before using it as an instructional model.

4. Use the Online version of Student Web Lesson, All That Data! as an instructional model (see the Materials section of this document for the specific Web address). Demonstrate the use of the Web lesson page by page on an Internet accessible computer/TV presentation cart. In this lesson students review a group of committee members' survey results and how they displayed their data in order to identify the range, mean, median, and mode of their individual and collective data results.

5. Provide a class discussion at the end of each Web page. Come to a consensus about the best answer for each field during the discussion. Type in the most popular answers from the class discussion in each field of the Web lesson and further discuss as a whole class the computer's responses. The program offers hints if the answer is not correct and offers congratulations if you are right.

6. After completing All That Data Online with students, ask students to turn in their completed Printable Version of the Student Web Lesson, All That Data! (see associated file). Provide proper feedback for each student and offer more instruction to students who had difficulty with any part of this lesson.

7. Review the procedures for collecting data responses and displaying the information. Instruct students on how to choose reasonable titles, labels, scales, and intervals. Possibly provide a mini-lesson on how to complete circle graphs using common fractions or percents. Also, discuss why line graphs would not be appropriate for the kinds of data collected in this survey.

8. Allow each small group that was created in yesterday's lesson Observing the Evidence to reconvene and discuss the results that they gathered during their survey of 5th grade students asking, How much time should the average fifth-grade student spend on homework to make good grades? Utilize your own methods for cooperative group work in order to ensure on-task behavior from students. Remind students that they should have surveyed six -- 5th grade students and that students surveyed should have only been surveyed once.

9. While in their groups, ask students to display the results gathered from their section of the representative sample of 5th grade students. EACH group member should create an appropriate bar and circle graph to display the data, remembering to include titles, labels, scales, and intervals. Two comparative statements should be written after each graph. To see a sample of what to expect from students observe 2 A -- 3 C of the Excerpt from the Diagnostic Assessment #2 (see associated file). You may also choose to use the Diagnostic Assessment as an instructional model if students have any difficulty creating their own graphs. Using the information gathered by each group, assign Detective Diary Entry #6.

10. DD#6, After collecting the results from the survey of 5th grade students, what are some ways we can display the data that will help us easily identify the range, mean, median, and mode of the data? Based on the results that you collected, what comparisons can be made among students' responses? Allow students enough time for completion.

11. Provide individual feedback for each student upon his or her completion of this diary entry-using the criteria from the Short-Answer Question Rubric (see associated file).

12. As a class, students' peer-assess diary entry #6 using the criteria listed on the Short-Answer Question Rubric.

13. Assign additional practice in displaying data on bar and circle graphs. Focus homework assignments on the area students need additional assistance in. For example, determining appropriate scales and intervals, and using common fractions in circle graphs are both new concepts for 5th graders according to Florida's Grade Level Expectation. Use appropriate pages out of your classroom text for practice problems.

14. Provide Data Display Checklist (see associated file) for students to use after they have completed their group graphs. Did they remember to include appropriate titles, labels, scales, and intervals for each group? Is the data accurately graphed?

Assessments

Formative assessments:

1) Based on yesterday's homework assignment (text pages), check each students answers.

2) After collecting students' work Printable Version of the Student Web Lesson, All That Data! provide individual feedback to students regarding their answers.

3) Check students' displays of results gathered from their section of the representative sample of 5th grade students. Each group member should create an appropriate double bar and circle graph to display the data, remembering to include titles, labels, scales, and intervals. Also each student should write two comparative statements (in sentence form) after each graph. Excerpt from Diagnostic Assessment #2 can be used as a model for these concepts. Use the Data Display Checklist provided to check student progress. This assignment serves as formative assessment and should not be graded, but rather used to gauge student progress.

4) Next, students respond in their diary E#6, After collecting the results from the survey of 5th grade students, what are some ways we can display the data that will help us easily identify the range, mean, median, and mode of the data? Based on the results that you collected, what comparisons can be made between students' responses?

5) After responding in their Detective Diaries, students peer-assess these entries using the criteria listed on the Short-Answer Question Rubric. Provide individual feedback for students to make sure that they correctly display the data that was collected in their survey conducted in the previous Lesson Observing the Evidence.

Extensions

This is the third lesson of the unit Data, Detectives and Decisions. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2942 . Once you select the unit’s link, scroll tot the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

Lesson 1 – Opening the Case
Lesson 2 – Observing the Evidence

Web Links

This site offers an online math dictionary for educators and students. You want to check this out!
A Maths Dictionary for Kids

This site offers an online math dictionary for educators and students. You want to check this out!
Harcout Math Glossary

This site offers an excellent illustration of a stem-and-leaf plot and allows for interactive practice finding the mean, median, and mode of data using an Online stem-and-leaf plot.
Making Stem and Leaf Plots

This site is ABSOLUTELY awesome!! It allows students the opportunity to practice using data in a stem-and-leaf plot to find the mean, median, and mode.
Stem – and – Leaf Plotter

This site offers a demonstration lesson for teachers using stem-and-leaf plots.
Stem-and-Leaf Plots

Attached Files

Looking for More Clues Associated Files     File Extension: pdf

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