Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Independent - To Be or Not Top Be - Day 1, Lesson 2: Scavenger Hunt

Katie Koehnemann
Bay District Schools

Description

This lesson is designed to have students seek and find and record visually, and in sequential order, thirteen significant events that led to the Americans fight for independence and thus the start of the American Revolution.

Objectives

The student reads and organizes information from multiple sources for a variety of purposes (for example, supporting opinions, predictions, and conclusions; writing a research report; conducting interviews; taking a test; performing tasks).

The student extends the expectations of the fourth grade with increasingly complex reading selections, assignments and tasks (for example, differences between fact, fiction, opinion).

The student uses visual aids, technology, or demonstrations to support a presentation.

The student understands reasons Americans and those who led them went to war to win independence from England.

The student knows significant events between 1756 and 1776 that led to the outbreak of the American Revolution (for example, the French and Indian War, the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party).

Materials

-American Flag graphic organizers (See directions in Associated File)
-Tape of patriotic music
-Transparency of Scavenger Hunt Task Sheet (In Associated File)
-Transparency of Teachers Liberties – The Answers (In Associated File)
-A complete set of the selected subject pages from each of the five Websites (hole-punched) for each student
-Overhead projector and screen
-Selected significant events written on individual pieces of sentence strip (French and Indian War, Proclamation of 1763, Sugar Act, Stamp Act, Boston Massacre, Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts, First Continental Congress, Shots heard round the world, Battle of Bunker Hill, Olive Branch Petition, Common Sense, Declaration of Independence)
-Pocket chart
-Students will need to have their Independent notebooks
-Tokens
Clarification: I am very much against external prizes, rewards, or payment for what is expected of students. Personally, I do not believe in tokens, stickers, points, treats, or anything else other than the intrinsic reward of obedience and a job well done. However, in this particular unit I have incorporated a hardy and blatant use of tokens only to allow the students to experience taxation without representation. There is no auction at the end of the unit. They will be aggravated and frustrated as their money is collected through taxe,s and they will think it not fair that they had no vote, no say, and no warning of the taxes as they are imposed. In the end, they will be tickled to realize they have been set up to experience taxation without representation, and I guarantee they will have a greater understanding of what it means.

Preparations

1. Make an American flag graphic organizer for each student. You will need volunteers to make these before starting the unit. (See directions for making these in Associated File.)
2. Bookmark all suggested Websites on computers that will be used during this unit.
3. Copy and hole punch a complete set of the printed Website pages for each student.
4. Make a transparency of the Scavenger Hunt Task Sheet.
5. Make a transparency of Teachers Liberties – The Answers.
6. Write on individual pieces of sentence strip each significant event listed.
7. Have an overhead projector with viewing surface.
8. Have a pocket chart.
9. Students will need their Independent notebooks.
10. Gather an abundance of tokens, and do not forget to distribute them throughout the lesson.

Procedures

1. Explain to students that they will be working through Website text. The task today is to locate selected significant events, which led up to the Revolutionary War, and to place them in correct chronological order. Also, they will be learning how to scan text for information and how to use that information to help locate answers and details for specific questions.

2. One at a time, and in mixed order, hold up each of the event cards. Choose various students to read each aloud and then place it in the pocket chart.

3. Hand out to each student a set of printed Website pages from each of the five Websites. (See Weblinks Section.) (You will be choosing these according to your students’ reading levels and needs.)

4. Present the task by displaying the Scavenger Hunt Task Card (See Associated File) on the overhead projector. Go over each item on the task card to be certain all students completely understand.

5. Lead students through the guided reading process. Through questioning techniques, students should develop an understanding of important strategies for scanning. Formative assessment occurs as students respond by suggesting easy ways to scan, such as looking for dates and event titles. Guide student learning with further questions, such as where would they look for more information on this subject. Your goal is for students to:
Be comfortable with the text.
Be accustomed to these pages so that they will be familiar with them when they search for answers to specific questions.
Develop an understanding of why and when to scan.
Understand and demonstrate the strategies of scanning.
Learn where to click next for more information.
Read and follow directions.
Explain that the text is a print out of the same Websites they will be using for locating information for this unit of study.

6. As the lesson progresses, do not allow it to become a free for all, or contest where students are waving their hands, hollering out answers and creating a sense of competition. This is Guided Reading and should be conducted as such for all students.

7. Students find, within the printed pages, each event listed in the pocket chart. As they do so, they start suggesting rearrangement of ideas so as to list them in chronological order. Formative assessment occurs as students come to the chart to change the order. Look for accuracy of arrangement, reasoning for the suggested change to the order, and peer response to the changes. It may take several rearrangements before events are in the correct order of occurrence. (See Extensions for alternate activity.) (See Associated File for The Answers.)

8. Use questioning to facilitate students thinking about facts vs. opinions. For example, you might ask if the events just put in chronological order are facts or opinions about history? Formatively assess students by listening for the idea that these are facts because they really happened. Establish what an opinion about these events might be. For example, students may suggest that an opinion about an event would be a newspaper article that gives a personal viewpoint about it.

9. Hand out to each student an American Flag graphic organizer flip chart. Instruct students to copy each event as it is listed in the pocket chart onto their flags. (One event per stripe.) (See Associated File for The Answers.)

10. Put up Teacher Liberties – The Answers (In Associated File) transparency for students to self-assess their work.

11. Have students place their Website printed pages in their notebooks.

12. Direct students to place their American Flag graphic organizers in their notebooks or choose to collect them, whichever works best for your class.

13. Through a brainstorming session, ask students to name the visual aids used in this lesson, and for each one named, give a brief explanation of how it helped in the presentation. Formative assessment occurs as students make suggestions. Look for ideas, such as transparency, pocket chart, and graphic organizer.

Assessments

Formative assessment occurs as students respond to how, why, and when questions with regards to scanning (Procedures #5), and to questions about fact vs. opinion (Procedures #8). Understanding of the order of the events to be studied is formatively assessed as students arrange the list of events in chronological order and give reasons for their choices (Procedures #7). Understanding of what a visual aid is and how it is effective is formatively assessed as students name the visual aids used in this lesson and give a brief explanation of how they felt it was effective (Procedures #14).

Extensions

1. Alternative activity: Make sets of strips with the 13 significant events written on them for students to use in groups of two. They can move their own strips of paper and place the events in the correct order, rather than having to look at the pocket chart.
2. Lessons may reflect modifications of, but are designed in conjunction with, the Reading Framework approach to classroom instruction and may be adapted to the Four Block Classroom. It is suggested that you have a historical fiction, or non-fiction book selected for use with the Shared Reading Component. Also, for the Self-Selected Reading Component, you will need to have appropriate period books available for which students to choose.
3. Liberty and Justice for All is an interactive Student Web Lesson. The lesson addresses this standard: the student understands reasons Americans and those who led them went to war to win independence from England. (See link to unit plan at the top of this page.)
4. United We Stand is an interactive Student Web Lesson. The lesson addresses this standard: the student knows significant events between 1756 and 1776 that led to the outbreak of the American Revolution. (See link to unit plan at the top of this page.)
5. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2956. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files, if any.

Web Links

This site offers extensive materials to assist your unit study. At this site be sure to click on Teacher’s Guide for a helpful list of information, also click on Causes of the War for links to each event.
The Revolutionary War

From this site, click on Background to the Campaign. The first page gives an overview of the events leading to the Revolutionary War, the second is background on the British, and the third is background on the Americans. On each of these pages at the top left click play a tune to hear a sample of period music. This site offers student friendly, easy read, large print articles.
The Philadelphia Campaign

The Timeline of the Revolution is a wonderful resource. From the timeline you can find articles on events such as the Boston Tea Party and more.
Chronicle of the Revolution

Scroll down a little more than half way to find documents pertinent to this unit, for example, the Stamp Act, Sugar Act, etc.
The American Colonists Library

Click the Table of Contents for lots of information and links.
Dedicated to the Flag of the United States of America

This is a wonderful site. It is also listed in Salute to Old Glory in the Associated File, a listing of sites and special activity suggestions and ideas.
The Unofficial American Flag Home Page

A colorful site. It is also listed in Salute to Old Glory in the Associated File, a listing of sites and special activity suggestions and ideas.
Historical Flags of the United States

Don’t miss The Road to Revolution, a Revolutionary war game. It is fabulous with sound effects (have students wear headsets), film clips, links, instant feedback, and side trips to learn more. Also, click on Chronicle of the Revolution. From here there are various links. From the timeline you can find articles on events such as the Boston Tea Party and more.
Liberty! The American Revolution

At this site, in the left hand column, click Colonial America. Scroll down to French and Indian War (#19). Click View in Text. This site offers questions about the French and Indian War with links to sites where students can find the answers.
Colonial America

At this site, in the left hand column, click American Revolution. Numerous tracks (Bunker Hill, Stamp Act, Concord, Lexington, Boston Tea Party, Boston Massacre, and more) are offered. Click the track you are interested in. Next click View in Text. Each track offers questions and mini assignments with links for finding the answers.
The American Revolution

Attached Files

Directions, Task Card, Answer Key     File Extension: pdf

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