Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Independent - To Be or Not Top Be - Day 6, Lesson 4: Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?

Katie Koehnemann
Bay District Schools

Description

Students play a version of the game [Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?] as a review for knowledge and understanding of significant events, reasons leading to the American Revolution, and the difference between fact and opinion.

Objectives

The student reads and organizes information from multiple sources for a variety of purposes (for example, supporting opinions, predictions, and conclusions; writing a research report; conducting interviews; taking a test; performing tasks).

The student extends the expectations of the fourth grade with increasingly complex reading selections, assignments and tasks (for example, differences between fact, fiction, opinion).

The student uses strategies to speak clearly, (for example, rate, volume, phrasing, enunciation).

The student prepares for and gives presentations for specific occasions, audiences, and purposes (including but not limited to informational or imaginative presentations, research reports, extemporaneous talks).

The student uses visual aids, technology, or demonstrations to support a presentation.

The student uses nonverbal strategies to engage an audience (for example, eye contact, gestures, posture, facial expressions).

The student understands reasons Americans and those who led them went to war to win independence from England.

The student knows significant events between 1756 and 1776 that led to the outbreak of the American Revolution (for example, the French and Indian War, the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party).

Materials

-Studentsí American Flag graphic organizer
-Studentsí Independent notebook
-Question Cards (In Associated File)

Preparations

1. Print a copy of sample questions. (In Associated File) Four of the sample questions are the leading questions created for the French and Indian War QAD, two questions are about fact and opinion, and two refer to presentation skills.
2. Make copies of blank question cards. (In Associated File) Create questions appropriate for your class. Generate questions from the QAD for each significant event and that are assessed on the summative assessment. Questions about fact and opinion and presentation skills should also be included. They should be aligned with your teaching of these skills and strategies and should reflect items covered on the summative assessment.
3. Have a procedure for dividing into two teams and arranging furniture conducive to the set up of the game.

Procedures

1. Divide class into two teams. Only one team plays at a time. The other team is the audience. Have the two teams turn their desks so that they are facing each other.

2. Team One goes first. Each student on the team is asked one question at a time. The turn rotates from member to member. Each student is allowed two lifelines, one Ask the Audience and the other Call a Friend.

3. Draw a card; ask the first player the question. Give sufficient time to answer the question with or without using a lifeline.

4. Ask: Is that your final answer? Are you sure? Do you want to change your answer, etc.?

5. If the student answers correctly, the team is awarded the amount of the jackpot. If the answer is wrong, the group's turn is over. Record the amount they won on the chalkboard. Formative assessment occurs as contestants give answers to the questions and/or peers give answers as lifelines.

6. Once each member of the team has had a turn, reverse team roles.

7. Begin questioning the other team, following the same procedures.

8. The team finishing with the most earnings wins the game.

9. Option: As soon as a team member misses a question, the teamís turn is over and roles are reversed, and the other team is the contestant. Continue the game by reversing roles again and begin questioning with the next player until all questions have been asked.

Question values are as follows:
$25; $50; $100; $200; $300; $400; $500; $1000; $2000; $3000; $ 4000; $ 8000; $16,000; $32,000; $64,000; $125,000; $250,000; $5000,000; $1,000,000.

Assessments

Formative assessment occurs as contestants give answers to the questions and/or peers give answers as lifelines.

Extensions

1. Have each student create a question card with answer. Formatively assess each studentís question and answer for understanding and clarity.
2. Liberty and Justice for All is an interactive Student Web Lesson. The lesson addresses this standard: the student understands reasons Americans and those who led them went to war to win independence from England. (See link to unit plan at the top of this page.)
3. United We Stand is an interactive Student Web Lesson. The lesson addresses this standard: the student knows significant events between 1756 and 1776 that led to the outbreak of the American Revolution. (See link to unit plan at the top of this page.)
4. Lessons may reflect modifications of, but are designed in conjunction with, the Reading Framework approach to classroom instruction and may be adapted to the Four Block Classroom. It is suggested that you have a historical fiction or a non-fiction book selected for use with the Shared Reading Component. Also, for the Self-Selected Reading Component, you will need to have appropriate period books available for which students to choose.
5. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2956. Once you select the unitís link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, Associated Files. This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files, if any.

Attached Files

Sample Question Cards, Blank Question Cards†††††File Extension: pdf

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.