Beacon Lesson Plan Library

It Is the Little Things that Count

Brent Johns

Description

Students participate in warm-up, cool-down, and hydration activities while learning the reasons these techniques are important for physical health, especially in Florida's humid climate.

Objectives

The student knows proper warm-up, conditioning, and cool-down techniques and the reasons for using them.

Materials

-Posterboard with various warm-up exercises on it
-Posterboard with various cool-down options on it
-Water fountains or water source nearby
-Cones and other equipment as needed for the game that you choose.

Preparations

1. Make a warm-up poster using pictures of various stretches for all parts of the body. Some stretches are hamstring stretch, calf stretch, arm stretches, quadricep stretches, and bicep and tricep stretches.

2. Set up cones and get equipment for the game of your choice.

3. If you do not have water fountains nearby, obtain a large water cooler and cups.

4. Make a poster detailing various cool-down procedures. These include walking, slow stretches, and slow calisthentics.

Procedures

1. Have the students slowly jog the equivalent of 1 lap.

2. As they return, explain to the students that they will be learning the importance of warming up before physical activity and how they can warm up the right way. Tell them that they jogged a slow lap to begin to warm the muscles in preparation for stretching. Tell them also that a proper warm-up and cool-down are for safety reasons as you participate in activity. The better they are warmed up, the less likely they are to have an injury to their muscular system.

3. Show the students the warm-up poster with the various stretches on it. The stretches should include hamstring and calf stretches, pectoral and deltoid stretches, and bicep and tricep stretches.

4. Explain how these stretches allow the muscles to prepare for activity. Then perform the stretches with the students.

5. Play a game of Everyone's It tag with the class. In this tag game, everyone is it and can be tagged by anyone else. If tagged, a student will do an exercise of choice and then rejoin the game. This game should last about 10 minutes with 2 to 3 rounds.

6. Call for the students to stop and take a water break. After they get water, explain the importance of keeping the body hydrated, especially in hot and humid conditions. Tell them that the body loses water quickly through sweat and, without drinking water, it faces the danger of heat related illnesses such as heatstroke.

7. Play a game or sport or your choice. This should be something that the class already knows and can begin playing without long instruction.

8. After the game is finished instruct the students to drink some water and then return to the teacher.

9. Show the cool-down poster to the students. There should be at least 3 options on the poster. Some options are walking, slow stretching,and slow calisthentics. Inform the students of the importance of cooling down after each workout or activity time. Cooling down after a workout allows students' heart rates to return slowly to a resting heart rate. It also prevents lactic acid from pooling in the muscles. This will prevent soreness.

10. After the students choose a cool-down and complete it, call them in to ask the following questions.
Why do you think you should do a cool-down?
How are warm-ups and cool-downs similar? How are they different?
Give feedback to the students based on the answers that were given.

11. Conclude the lesson.

Assessments

After the students choose a cool-down and complete it, call them in to ask the following questions.
Why do you think you should do a cool-down? How are warm-ups and cool-downs similar?
How are they different?

Give feedback to the students based on the answers that were given. An additional assessment for this lesson could take place during the next lesson. As students come to the class session, observe them for warm-up techniques. As the lesson is completed, observe them for proper cool-down techniques. It may also be appropriate to have each student keep a journal with what was done each day for warm-up and cool-down techniques, as well as water breaks during activity.

Extensions

As students become regular users of cool-down techniques, teach them how to calculate target heart rate and monitor their heart rate as they cool down.
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