Beacon Lesson Plan Library

The Multimedia Heart

Carol Rine
Bay District Schools

Description

Working in groups, students research the different aspects of the human heart. Groups work through steps to create a multimedia slide presentation. The presentation must follow preset criteria.

Objectives

The student organizes information before writing according to the type and purpose of writing.

The student drafts and revises writing that -is focused, purposeful, reflects insight into the writing situation;-conveys a sense of completeness and wholeness with adherence to the main idea;-has an organizational pattern that provide for a logical progression of ideas;-has support that is substantial, specific, revelant, concrete, and/or illustrative;-demonstrates a commitment to and an involvement with the subject;-has clarity in presentation of ideas;uses creative writing strategies appropriate to the purpose of the paper;demonstrates a command of language (word choice) with freshness of expression;has varied sentence structure and sentences that are complete except when fragments are used and purposefully; andhas few, if any, convention errors in mechanics, usage, and punctuation.

The student produces final documents that have been edited for-correct spelling;-correct punctuation, including commas, colons, and semicolons;-correct common usage, including subject/verb agreement, common noun/pronoun agreement, common possessive forms, and with a variety of sentence structures,including parallel structure; and-correct formatting.

The student selects and uses appropriate formats for writing, including narrative, persuasive, and expository formats, according to the intended audience, purpose, and occasion.

The student asks questions and makes comments and observations that reflect understanding and application of content, processes, and experiences.

The student speaks for various occasions, audiences, and purposes, including conversations, discussions, projects, and informational, persuasive, or technical presentations.

The student knows how body systems work together and influence each other.

Materials

-Software: Microsoft PowerPoint or some other presentation software such as HyperStudio
-Equipment: One or more classroom computers with Internet capabilities, a signal converter, and a big screen TV
-Time: Time depends upon the length of the rotation schedule, class size, etc. My classes worked through this in about two weeks.
-Reference books: The teacher should go to the library and pull a variety of books on the heart and the cardiovascular system. Texts might include anything from medical journals and magazines to non-fiction books such as the Dorling Kindersley Eyewitness series. This makes a miniature research center in the classroom.

Preparations

1. Create computer desktop folders for each of the classes e.g. 1st pd., 2nd pd., etc.
2. Obtain diskettes for each of the classes.
3. Create a computer desktop folder to store graphics, videos, and wavs (sound files) relating to the heart.
4. Browse the Internet and collect heart graphics, videos, and wavs and store them in designated folders on the desktop.
5. Prepare desk work related to the unit for the students who are not on the computer since this activity is accomplished in a one computer classroom.
6. Create a rotation schedule to move students on and off the computer.
7. Create an oral presentation rubric to judge the multi-media slide presentations.

Procedures

Introduction: This lesson can be part of an interdisciplinary unit based on the heart or can be used as a"stand-alone" lesson. To gain the students' attention on the day that we are to begin this lesson, I use a KWL chart. Using a "K" poster I ask the students what they already "Know" about the heart. We then discuss any of those items they listed in the class discussion that might be incorrect. We discuss the most common items, and then we proceed to the "W" part of the poster. I ask the students, "What do you want to know about the heart?" At the conclusion of the activities, we will discuss the "L." What did the students "learn?"

Day one: Demonstrate the PowerPoint or other presentation software to the class. Deliver the assignment to the class. The class receives its group assignments. Groups receive their research assignments. Students break into the designated groups and begin researching the predetermined topics according to criteria. This can be done by taking the class to the library or by checking out a classroom set of non-fiction books on the heart for their research as mentioned in the materials section.

Group assignments:
The entire class creates a slide show with an eight slide minimum. This puts students into groups of four to five with the entire class consisting of about eight groups.

Slide assignments:
Group 1/Slide 1= Title of presentation, group members, and correct heading; Group 2/Slide 2= introduction to the heart and blood consisting of a paragraph to define and introduce viewers to the heart; Group 3/Slide 3= composition of the heart consisting of a paragraph defining five major parts of the heart and their functions; Group 4/Slide 4= heart rate and pulse containing an explanation of these components in one paragraph; Group 5/Slide 5= one paragraph explaining heart beat and blood circulation; Group 6/Slide 6= five or more interesting facts about the heart; Group 7/Slide 7= reflection of the assignment in student opinion evaluating the use of technology and group work; Group 8/Slide 8= one paragraph concluding the presentation of the heart by re-emphasizing the importance of the heart and blood to summarize the entire presentation.

Criteria:
Each slide must contain the preset information assigned in the group assignments, but it must also contain the following technical criteria. Each small group must create one slide. Each slide must have at least one sound, one graphic, one transition, and one animation.

Day two: Students return to groups and continue researching the heart. Students create a rough draft on paper in order to use it as a reference when publishing their slides. The rough draft should be edited and ready for publishing to the group slide presentation by the next class period.

Day three to completion of slide presentations: The teacher demonstrates the software to the class as a review before the students begin the rotation schedule. Questions from students are addressed. Students receive their classwork assignments relating to the heart, and the small groups begin rotating on the computer.

Final three to five sessions: Students will present their slide presentations to the class with each student responsible for discussing at least one slide. The students observing in the classroom are responsible for taking notes on the presentations. The presenting groups should provide printed copies of their slides to the class. Students watching the presentations can make notes out to the side. PowerPoint has a -notes- page that offers a printed version of 3 slides per page along with space and lines for notes. Whatever the case, these notes will be collected and then returned to students as study material for an extension part of this unit.

Students that are presenting should be ready for a "Question, Answer, & Comments" session following the presentations.

During the final session, the teacher collects the notes from each student in the class.

As a wrap-up activity, the teacher assigns a reflective paragraph. Students write in a complete paragraph (introduction, body, and conclusion) two specific items they learned about the heart. They include two elements regarding the technology they learned in the classroom. As a conclusion, have students state whether they felt this was a valuable activity or not AND tell why.

Assessments

Assess the slide Presentation using the Oral Presentation Rubric below:

ORAL PRESENTATION RUBRIC

Score 3 : High Pass

*Student's slide presentation is created using 8 slides from the presentation software MS PowerPoint or some other presentation software.
*Student's slide presentation contains downloaded graphics and sounds from the Internet on every slide.
*Student's slide presentation contains information obtained during collaborative group research on the human heart gathered from the class research time.
*Student's slide presentation exhibits the traits of a final product; prewriting,organization, editiing, and revision have been done beforehand to provide the best possible product.
*During the presentation, student uses appropriate vocabulary obtained from classroom research time; vocabulary includes words such as heart beat, pulse rate, veins, arteries, etc.
*During the presentation, student uses appropriate turn-taking skills during oral delivery.
*During the presentation, student uses volume, stress, and pacing to produce strong delivery of the slide show.

Score 2 : Pass

*Student's slide presentation is created using 6 to 8 slides from a presentation software such as Microsoft PowerPoint.
*Student's slide presentation contains some downloaded graphics and sounds from the Internet.
*Student's slide presentation contains some information obtained during collaborative group research on the human heart gathered from the class research time.
*Student's slide presentation exhibits some of the traits of a final product; prewriting, organization, editiing, and revision have been attempted beforehand to provide a good product.
*During the presentation, student uses some of the vocabulary obtained from classroom research time; vocabulary includes words such as heart beat, pulse rate, veins, arteries, etc.
*During the presentation, student attempts to use appropriate turn-taking skills during oral delivery.
*During the presentation, student attempts to use volume, stress, and pacing for delivery of the slide show.

Score 1 : Needs Assistance

*Student's slide presentation is created using less than 5 slides from the pressentation software such as Microsoft PowerPoint.
*Student's slide presentation contains very few downloaded graphics and sounds from the Internet.
*Student's slide presentation is missing information obtained during collaborative group research on the human heart gathered from the classroom research time.
*Student's slide presentation needs some reworking to exhibit the traits of a final product; prewriting, organization, editiing, and revision have not been successfully attempted beforehand.
*During the presentation, student seldom uses the vocabulary obtained from classroom research time; vocabulary should include words such as heart beat, pulse rate, veins, arteries, etc.
*During the presentation, student interrupts instead of using appropriate turn-taking skills during oral delivery.
*During the presentation, student is reluctant to use volume, stress, and pacing for delivery of the slide show.

1. Knowledge of the heart will be assessed with the three point rubric for quality and accuracy of information on the slides: highly appropriate, totally accurate; generally appropriate and/or accurate; somewhat appropriate and/or accurate.

2. The oral presentation rubric will include the following criteria: preparedness, voice clarity, volume, and use of the visual aid. The three levels will be excellent, average, and needs improvement.

3. Editing skills will be assessed for correctness at three levels: no errors, few errors, and needs serious revision.

The teacher will assess the technology skills through observation. The teacher will observe the process and the end product. All required elements specified in the preset criteria must be present on the slides.

The student notes should be assessed by the teacher in a simple format that designates whether the student completed notes in -paraphrase- form. This means the student should use their own words to describe their learning from the oral slide presentations.

Assess the student paragraphs according to described criteria in procedures described above. Use a Florida Writes rubric, Creating Writers' six trait rubric (Northwest Regional Educational Lab), or some other writing assesment tool to judge the paragraphs.

Circulate and formatively assess students as they use the technology tools. Provide assistance for students who are experiencing difficulty and monitor accordingly.

Extensions

Pre- and post-test of heart knowledge: This would allow the teacher to evaluate the actual content knowledge gained from the activity. Additionally, this activity could be coordinated with what is being taught in the students' science class, making it more interdisciplinary.

Web Links

Web supplement for The Multimedia Heart
Heart Attacks

Web supplement for The Multimedia Heart
The Human Heart

Web supplement for The Multimedia Heart
Anatomy Resource Kits

Web supplement for The Multimedia Heart
Heart: An Online Exploration

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