Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Eco the Gecko and the Story of Economics

Laurie Ayers
Bay District Schools

Description

Eco the Gecko, a puppet, leads students on a journey to discover basic concepts of economics.

Objectives

The student understands ways scarcity affects the choices people make in everyday situations.

The student knows the difference between goods and services.

The student knows the difference between consumers and producers.

The student knows examples of economic choices and what is given up when making a choice.

The student understands that work provides income to purchase goods and services.

The student understands the purpose of markets (for example, sellers compete to sell the same or similar products and buyers have choices).

The student understands that people in different places around the world depend on each other for the exchange of goods and services.

Materials

Day 1
-Eco the Gecko Puppet (Eco the Gecko Puppet Patterns are in the associated files)
-Copies of Diagnostic Assessment (pretest and KWL) (see extensions)
-K-W-L chart (in associated files)
-Social studies big word board – This can be a bulletin board with the heading “Social Studies Big Word Board” or chart paper with the same heading taped to the wall with a border around it. Vocabulary words and definitions are added each day as they are introduced and discussed. The words and definitions can be written on construction paper or cards and then placed on the bulletin board, or they can be written on chart paper.
-Unit GLEs written on cards or construction paper
-My Economics Journal title page and 3 pieces of 8 1/2” x 11” paper for each student
-Copies of “I Mean Business Journal Checklist,- one per student (in associated files)
-Copy of I Mean Business Journal Entries (in associated files)
-Cunningham, Patricia M., Dorothy P. Hall, and Cheryl M. Sigmon. [The Teacher's Guide to the Four Blocks]. Greensboro: Carson-Dellosa, 1999.
-Student Online Web Lesson, Business Buddies

Day 2
-Toy stuffed pig and real pancake if possible, if not, use the Picture of a Pig and Picture of Pancakes (in associated files)
-Writing surface (chalkboard, wipe off board, chart paper, etc.) to record student predictions
-[If You Give a Pig a Pancake] by Laura Numeroff or other similar books by the same author, [If You Give a Mouse a Cookie] or [If you Give a Moose a Muffin]
-Sample Teacher Version of “If You Give a Pig a Pancake” (in associated files)
-Pre-assembled student books for their versions of the story. Directions for making these are in the Teacher Preparation section of this lesson plan.
-Markers or crayons for the students
-Herman, Charlotte. [Max Malone Makes a Million], ISBN 0805023283. New York, Henry Holt, 1991. A copy of this book can be located through SUNLINK at http://www.sunlink.ucf.edu (If the teacher plans to include the Read Aloud Component Lesson A, Super Sellers)
-Student Online Web Lesson, Business Buddies

Day 3
-Eco the Gecko puppet
-Bulletin board background paper and border (to display the Eco the Gecko puzzle)
-A copy of the “Scarcity in Scare City” story (in associated files)
-“Scarcity Role-Playing Cards” (in associated files)
-Copies of “Scarcity Detective” badges (in associated files)
-Chart paper and marker to record scarcity situations students observe
-Copies of the “Note to Parents” to explain the Scavenger Hunt homework assignment (in associated files), one per student.
-[Max Malone Makes a Million] by Charlotte Herman (If the teacher plans to include the Read Aloud Component Lesson A, Super Sellers)
-Student Online Web Lesson, Business Buddies

Day 4
-Examples of producers and consumers (in associated files)
-“Producer/Consumer Role-Playing Cards” (in associated files)
-[The Berenstain Bears and the Trouble with Money] by Stan and Jan Berenstain
-Eco the Gecko puppet
-Eco the Gecko puzzle pieces (head and first three pieces) for the bulletin board. Use the Eco the Gecko Bulletin Board Pattern to create yours (in associated files)
-Pictures from magazines or books of people working
-[Max Malone Makes a Million] by Charlotte Herman (If the teacher plans to include the Read Aloud Component Lesson A, Super Sellers)
-Student Online Web Lesson, Business Buddies

Day 5
-Copies of Summative Assessment 1, one per student (see extensions)
-Examples of products produced in different countries
-[Max Malone Makes a Million] by Charlotte Herman (If the teacher plans to include the Read Aloud Component Lesson A, Super Sellers)
-Student Online Web Lesson, Business Buddies

Day 6
-Scored Summative Assessment 1 papers
-A big purse or shopping bag, coins, and a pair of walking shoes
-Magazine pictures, clipart, or pictures in books of markets where people are exchanging goods and services
-[Bunny Money] by Rosemary Wells
-Puzzle piece #4 of the Eco the Gecko Bulletin Board Pattern
-[Max Malone Makes a Million] by Charlotte Herman (If the teacher plans to include the Read Aloud Component Lesson A, Super Sellers)
-Student Online Web Lesson, Business Buddies

Day 7
-Eco the Gecko puppet
-Two or three items that were produced in another country
-Overhead transparency of a world map (in associated files)
-Overhead projector
-Overhead markers
-A reference book with a map of the world (The social studies textbook might work.)
-Goods students collected on their home scavenger hunts
-Eco the Gecko puzzle piece #5 and tail from the Eco the Gecko Bulletin Board Pattern (in associated files)
-Chalkboard, wipe-off board surface, chart, or overhead transparency to create a class graph on
-[Max Malone Makes a Million] by Charlotte Herman (If the teacher plans to include the Read Aloud Component Lesson A, Super Sellers)
-Student Online Web Lesson, Business Buddies

Preparations

Day 1
1. Acquire a gecko puppet (a Beanie Baby or other stuffed animal lizard would be perfect) or make a paper bag puppet using the pattern in the associated files.
2. Download the Diagnostic Assessment and key (see extensions). Note: It is advised that when printing attachments and extensions for this unit, the teacher specify grayscale as the color option if using a black and white printer.
3. Make copies of the pretest, one per student.
4. Make copies of the journal title page found in the associated files, one per student.
5. Make copies of the “Journal Checklist”, one per student (in associated files).
6. Assemble journals for students.
7. Make a K-W-L chart on chart paper or whiteboard like the sample in the associated files.
8. Write the GLEs for the unit in a manner suitable for sharing with the students and for being displayed throughout the unit.
9. Create a “Social Studies Big Word Board” somewhere in your classroom. This can be on a bulletin board, on a piece of chart paper, on the back of a bookcase, or anywhere that can be accessed easily and is suitable to your situation.
10. Gather other materials needed for the lesson.
11. Preview and bookmark the Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] which accompanies this unit.
Note: It is suggested that since this Student Web Lesson is a review of the concepts taught, the teacher might want to pair students to complete the lesson to minimize the time element involved.
12. If the teacher chooses to use the Read Aloud Component Lesson A, Super Sellers, he/she needs to locate a copy of the book [Max Malone Makes a Million] by Charlotte Herman.

Day 2
1. Acquire a toy stuffed animal pig and a plate of real pancakes. If these are not available, use pictures in the associated files.
2. Gather materials listed.
3. Prepare a teacher version of [If You Give a Pig a Pancake]. See a sample in associated files. First, holding the four sheets of paper in the portrait format, fold four sheets of 8 ½” x 11”paper in half along the 11” sides, matching the corners. Staple them together at the fold at the top. On the front cover write the title [If You Give a Teacher a Book]. At the bottom of the first page write the sentence -If you give a teacher a book, then she will want her glasses (Example of a good).- Draw a picture of a book and some glasses at the top of the page. At the bottom of the next page write -If you give a teacher her glasses, she will want you to clean them for her (Example of a service).- At the top of the same page draw a picture of a child cleaning your glasses or a pair of sparkling clean glasses. For the third page, proceed in the same manner. This time write, -If you clean a teacher’s glasses, then she will want a warm, cozy chair (good).- Draw an appropriate picture at the top of the page. The fourth page continues with -If you give a teacher a warm, cozy chair, then she will want you to turn the pages as she reads (service).- Draw a picture to depict a student turning the pages of a book at the top. Repeat the procedure on the following pages with -If you turn the pages as she reads, she will want a bookshelf to place the book on when she’s finished (good)- and -If you give a teacher a bookshelf, she will put that book back on the shelf and read another one to you (service)!-
4. Make copies of the title page for the student books (in associated files), one per student. Note: There is one for boys and one for girls so make the number you need of each.
5. Assemble student books by folding the title page in half lengthwise. Fold lengthwise and insert three more blank sheets of paper. Staple the papers together at the top just below the fold.
6. Gather other materials needed for the lesson.

Day 3
1. Download and make a copy of the story “Scarcity in Scare City” (in associated files).
2. Download and make a copy of the “Scarcity Role-Playing Cards” (in associated files).
3. Download and make copies of “Scarcity Detective Badges” (in associated files).
4. Download and make copies of the “Note to Parents” explaining the Scavenger Hunt homework assignment (in associated files).
5. Gather other materials needed for the lesson.
6. Put up background paper and border for the Eco the Gecko bulletin board.

Day 4
1. Download and make a copy of the “Producer/Consumer Role-Playing Cards” (in associated files).
2. Gather pictures of people working from magazines or books. If the pictures are from magazines, mount them on construction paper to make them more presentable for display.
3. Download and make copies of all the Eco the Gecko puzzle pieces (in associated files). These should be colored, mounted on construction paper, and laminated to make them more durable.
4. Gather other materials needed for the lesson.

Day 5
1. Download and make copies of Summative Assessment #1, one per student, and the Summative Assessment #1 Answer Key, one copy for the teacher (see extensions). Collate the papers.
2. Score completed Summative Assessments #1 before Day 6.
3. Collect 2-3 examples of goods produced in other countries.
4. Gather pictures from magazines, books, or clipart to illustrate examples of markets (where people are exchanging goods or services).

Day 6
1. Continue locating 2-3 examples of goods produced in other countries, which are needed for Day 7.
2. Gather other materials for the lesson.

Day 7
1. Bring two or three goods that were produced in other countries.
2. Download and make a transparency of the world map (in associated files).

Procedures

Note - If the teacher has chosen to include the book [Max Malone Makes a Million] as a Read Aloud component of the Reading Framework for this unit, she/he needs to read daily from the book. The teacher displays questions prior to each day’s reading to provide a catalyst for purposeful listening by the students. Sample questions for each chapter can be found in the associated files.

Day 1 – Eco the Gecko
1. Introduce Eco the Gecko, a puppet, to gain student attention. Tell students a gecko is a small, mostly nocturnal, tropical lizard having toe pads that cling to smooth surfaces. Explain to students that Eco is here to help them learn about economics.

2. Distribute copies of the Diagnostic Assessment pretest and KWL. (see extensions). State the purpose of the Diagnostic Assessment is to give you an idea of what the students already know about economics so you can use the information to guide your planning and instruction of the unit. Make sure the students understand that this is a low-stakes test and they will not receive a grade for it. Tell them they are not expected to know all the answers and encourage them to just give it a try. Explain that when everyone is finished they will check their own papers.

3. Allow sufficient time for the majority of the students to complete the diagnostic.

4. Using the provided key, go over the diagnostic assessment and provide the correct responses. Students check their own papers. Allow time for students to discuss their responses.

5. Then guide the students in using the items on the pretest as criteria for the K-W-L chart (A sample is in the associated files). Beginning with the “K” or “What We Know” section of the chart, ask students to share any correct answers on their pretests. Record student responses on the chart.

6. For the “W” or “What I Want to Learn” section of the chart ask probing questions concerning the GLEs to be taught in this unit. Record student responses on the chart.
Ex. What is economics?
What are goods?
What are services?
What is the difference between producers and consumers?
Is it possible to be both a producer and a consumer?
Why do people work?
What is the purpose of markets?
What is scarcity?
How does scarcity affect our choices?

7. Discuss the purpose of the unit and the learning goals. You may want to post the unit GLEs somewhere in the room so the students can refer back to them as the unit progresses.

8. Using the Eco the Gecko puppet, introduce the vocabulary words economics, wants, goods, and services. Guide students in using decoding skills to decode the words. Point out that Eco’s name is in the word economics.

9. Draw student attention to the social studies big word board and explain that it will be used to note keywords and their meanings throughout the unit.

10. Add the words economics, wants, goods, and services and their meanings to the word board.

11. Everyone reads the words and their meanings in unison.

12. Review the vocabulary words previously introduced by having Eco the Gecko say, “I’m thinking of a word that means ______” and fill in the blank with the meaning of one of the new vocabulary words. The students guess which word Eco is thinking of.

13. Explain that another activity the students will be involved in during this unit is writing about what they are learning about economics in a daily journal.

14. Pass out the journal title page (in associated files) and back cover page (a plain sheet of 8 ½” x 11” paper). Instruct students to add 5-6 sheets of notebook paper between the cover pages. Staple the pages together along the left side. Students will also need crayons or markers.

15. Instruct students to write their names in the blank and decorate the front cover.

16. When the journal activity is completed, instruct the students as to where you want them to be kept. Journal entries will be made everyday at a time specified by the teacher. Prompts for I Mean Business Journal Entries and a I Mean Business Journal Checklist are in the associated files. Use the I Mean Business Journal Checklist (in associated files) to formatively assess student knowledge and understanding and provide feedback to students.

17. It is suggested that the Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] be used with this unit. This Student Web Lesson can be used any day(s) throughout the unit as an introductory lesson, as a practice lesson, or as a review lesson for the standards concerning goods and services and producers and consumers.

Day 2 – All I Ever Wanted
1. Review the vocabulary words taught on Day 1 by having students read the words and meanings from the social studies big word board.

2. To generate interest, if possible, display a toy stuffed pig and a plate of real pancakes (if the real objects are not readily available, use pictures in associated files). Ask students if they can predict what today’s economics lesson will be about. Record student predictions on an available surface (dry erase board, chalkboard, chart, etc.).

3. Tell the students you have a book to read to them. Explain that as you read, they are to purposefully listen to the story to find examples of wants, goods, and services.

4. Introduce the book, [If You Give a Pig a Pancake], by Laura Numeroff. Read the book. As you read, guide student understanding by asking probing questions to help students identify examples of wants, goods, and services.

5. Review the story with the students by listing examples of wants, goods, and services on a chart. Follow up on students’ earlier predictions about what the lesson would be about.
Optional activities:
A. Students work in pairs to come up with goods and services prior to working on their own books.
B. List on the board the goods and services found in the book [If You Give a Pig a Pancake]. Then list a number of goods and services for students to use as a springboard (toys, school supplies, chores, etc.).

6. Share other versions of the story written by the same author [If You Give a Mouse a Cookie] and/or [If You Give a Moose a Muffin].

7. Model how to make a different version of the story from a teacher perspective. Tell students your book will be entitled [If You Give a Teacher a Book]. Share the book you made as a lesson preparation with the students. Make sure you emphasize that you used three goods and three services as wants.

8. Explain now the students will have an opportunity to create their own versions of the story from a boy or girl perspective.

9. Pass out the pre-assembled books to students. Students write their names on them.

10. Instruct students to make a book similar to yours. Write the phrase “If you give a ______ a ________” on the board. Students are to fill in the blanks with appropriate words (If you give a boy a ______, If you give a girl a ____), and then complete the phrase telling a good or service that will be wanted as a result. Students are to complete the phrase six times, three times stating goods that would be wanted and three times stating services that would be wanted. Students then illustrate each page. Note - At this point you might encourage students to use a graphic organizer to help them get their ideas down before they begin working on their own books.

11. Allow time for students to complete their own versions of [If You Give a Pig a Pancake].

12. When finished, students turn in their books. Use the books to formatively assess student understanding of goods and services. Mastery is attained if the student included accurate examples of goods and services at least two out of three times. The formative feedback should be specific, guiding (I’m sorry. You must’ve forgotten that goods are things people make or grow.) and positive (That’s right! You remembered that goods are things people make or grow.).

13. Allow the students to present their books to others. Some ideas include: pairing and sharing, read aloud to students in another class, a small group read their books to the class each day at the beginning of the Social Studies unit time, students dramatize their stories, or make puppet presentations of their stories.

14. Journal entries will be made everyday at a time specified by the teacher. Prompts for “I Mean Business Journal Entries” and a “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” are in the associated files. Use the “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” to formatively assess student knowledge and understanding and provide feedback to students.

15. If the teacher has chosen to do the Read Aloud Component Lesson A, Super Sellers, he/she needs to begin reading the book [Max Malone Makes a Million] by Charlotte Herman on Day 2. The book can be read at the typical Read Aloud time, or at another convenient time during the day. The teacher should read one chapter a day throughout the unit. The book should be completed by Day 10.

16. It is suggested that the Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] be used with this unit. This Student Web Lesson can be used any day(s) throughout the unit as an introductory lesson, as a practice lesson, or as a review lesson for the standards concerning goods and services


Day 3 – “Scare City”
1. Reintroduce the puppet Eco the Gecko and explain that unlike the pig in the story yesterday, sometimes it is not possible for us to get all we want.

2. Tell students that Eco wants to tell them a story today. Write the title “Scarcity in Scare City” on the board. Guide students in understanding the play on words. Show them how scarcity can be made by dropping the e in scarce and the c in city and joining the remaining parts of both words. Write the new word scarcity and define it as meaning when there is not enough of something.

3. Add scarcity and its meaning to the big word board.

4. Use Eco the Gecko to tell the “Scarcity in Scare City” story which is in an associated downloadable file.

5. Guide discussion of the story to help students understand the concept of scarcity. Ask probing questions such as: What was scarce in Scare City? How did Eco solve his problem? What did he get? What did he give up?

6. Review the concept of scarcity. Brainstorm reasons as to why scarcity might occur (lack of resources, time constraints, expense, insufficient supply, etc.) State that sometimes because items are scarce, we have to make choices. Define choice (the act of choosing) and give examples. Add choice and its meaning to the big word board.

7. Explain that when we make choices we have to give up something. For example, I want a new pair of shoes. I saw a pair I liked at the mall. They cost $65.00. I tried them on and they felt good. I found another pair I liked at a different store. I really liked the way they looked, but they hurt my feet. They cost $56.00. I chose to buy the ones at the mall. I gave up buying the ones that hurt my feet.

8. Tell students that scarcity occurs in everyday situations. Give examples such as: Sometimes at school when we do arts and crafts there may not be enough markers for everyone. When that happens, we share them. Another time you may deal with scarcity is when you run out of paper. You may choose to deal with that scarcity situation by borrowing some from a friend. Remember – scarcity is when there is not enough of something.

9. Explain students will have an opportunity to role-play how they would choose to deal with various scarcity situations. Read a scarcity situation from one of the “Scarcity Role-Playing Cards” in the associated files. Enlist student volunteers to participate.

10. The students act out how they would deal with the scarcity situation. Repeat the procedure as often as needed or as time permits.

11. Review scarcity by asking students to retell scarcity situations that were on the role-playing cards. Tell students you are going to deputize them as “Scarcity Detectives”. Encourage students to be on the lookout for scarcity situations in their everyday interactions. If a student notices a scarcity situation and shares it with the class, he/she will receive a “Scarcity Detective” badge. Throughout the unit, anytime a student correctly identifies a situation of scarcity, make note of it on a chart and give the student a badge. This activity will serve as a daily review of scarcity in everyday situations and provide formative feedback to the teacher. The feedback should be specific, guiding and positive. Examples include- You’re right! It is a scarcity when everyone wants to use a green crayon and there is only one in the classroom! Another example would be - You must have forgotten. Scarcity isn’t when we have too many pencils. It’s when we don’t have enough. Let’s try again to find an example of scarcity.

12. Explain that, like Eco, sometimes when there is a scarcity of something we want or need we have to get it from another place. People in different places in the world depend upon each other to meet their needs and wants. For example, people in China depend upon people in Florida for oranges. Oranges do not grow well in China. They do grow well in Florida. Oranges from Florida are sent to China to help the Chinese meet their needs and wants for oranges. Goods are exchanged all over the world. Note - The teacher could use a wall map or globe to show the places goods could be exchanged. For homework each student is asked to go on a scavenger hunt (a game in which students are sent out to get certain items). They are to find a good that was produced in another country. Goods are to be brought to school by the seventh day of the unit. Send home a note to parents (in associated files) explaining the homework assignment.

13. Journal entries will be made everyday at a time specified by the teacher. To save time and to promote interdisciplinary learning, prompts for “I Mean Business Journal Entries” have been provided in the associated files. A “Journal Checklist” to formatively assess student knowledge and understanding and provide feedback to students is also included.

14. If the teacher has chosen to do the Read Aloud Component Lesson A, Super Sellers, he/she needs to continue reading the book [Max Malone Makes a Million] by Charlotte Herman. The book can be read at the typical Read Aloud time, or at another convenient time during the day. The teacher should read one chapter a day throughout the unit. The book should be completed by Day 10.

15. It is suggested that the Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] be used with this unit. This Student Web Lesson can be used any day(s) throughout the unit as an introductory lesson, as a practice lesson, or as a review lesson for the standards concerning goods and services

Day 4 – People in the Process
1. Review scarcity by asking students to retell or dramatize the “Scare City” story heard yesterday.

2. Review economics and its meaning by drawing student attention to the Social Studies Big Word Board and reading the entry for economics.

3. Explain that people play important roles in the economic process. Some people are producers. They work to make or grow goods and provide services. Provide examples. Some people are consumers. They buy goods and services from producers. Provide examples. Explain that often people are both producers and consumers and give examples. Note - At this point the teacher should familiarize himself/herself with the format for identifying producers and consumers and the goods and services they produce and consume on the Unit Summative. It would be beneficial to model the same type charting activity used on the Unit Summative several times throughout the unit to familarize the students with this assessment format.

4. Use decoding strategies to decode the new words producer and consumer on the board. Add the words and their meanings to the social studies big word board.

5. Tell the students they aren’t the only ones learning about economics. Introduce the book, [The Berenstain Bears and the Trouble with Money], by Stan and Jan Berenstain.

6. Encourage students to listen purposefully to the story. Write two or three questions on the board and instruct students to listen for answers to the questions. Possible questions could be:
A. What were some of the goods the bears wanted?
B. Did you hear any examples of services in this story?
C. Who were producers?
D. Who were consumers?

7. Read the book. Ask probing questions to help the students identify examples of goods, services, producers, and consumers. Note - The teacher might use this as an opportunity to model completing a chart about the producers and consumers in the story similar to the one on the Unit Summative. The class also discusses how the bears worked to earn money.

8. Discuss the selection providing formative feedback when needed. Student responses are used as a means of formatively assessing knowledge of key concepts and to guide instruction. Students should be able to accurately identify examples of goods and services and identify the producers and consumers on appropriate pages of the story. Remember to give specific feedback that will either instruct students on the correct answer or provide affirmation on the correct answer. ("That’s right. You must’ve known that a producer is a person who makes goods or sells services." or "No, you must’ve forgotten that a consumer is someone who buys goods and services.")

9. Use “Producer/Consumer Role-Playing Cards” from the associated files for students to act out various roles of producers and consumers. The students that are watching identify which is which by clapping if the person is acting like a producer and clicking fingers if the person is acting like a consumer.

10. Display the Eco the Gecko puppet and remind students that Eco wants to help them learn about economics. Each day Eco will help them review what they have learned. Draw attention to the bulletin board where Eco’s puzzle will be displayed. Explain that by the end of the unit the Eco puzzle will be complete.

11. Ask one student to put the puzzle piece of Eco’s head on the bulletin board. Enlist more students to read the review statements on the first three puzzle pieces and place them on the bulletin board. Throughout the unit, the Eco the Gecko bulletin board activity will serve as a means of review.

12. Journal entries will be made everyday at a time specified by the teacher. Prompts for “I Mean Business Journal Entries” and a “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” are in the associated files. The teacher will use the “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” to formatively assess student knowledge and understanding and provide feedback to students.

13. Continue awarding Scarcity Badges to students who recognize and share scarcity situations.

14. If the teacher has chosen to do the Read Aloud Component Lesson A, Super Sellers, he/she needs to continue reading the book [Max Malone Makes a Million]by Charlotte Herman. The book can be read at the typical Read Aloud time, or at another convenient time during the day. The teacher should read one chapter a day throughout the unit. The book should be completed by Day 10.

15. It is suggested that the Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] be used with this unit. This Student Web Lesson can be used any day(s) throughout the unit as an introductory lesson, as a practice lesson, or as a review lesson for the standards concerning goods and services


Day 5 – Show You Know
1. Administer Summative Assessment 1. (see extensions)

2. Remind students that their scavenger hunt items need to be brought to school by Day 7 of the unit. Show examples of products that were produced in different countries.

3. Journal entries will be made everyday at a time specified by the teacher. Prompts for “I Mean Business Journal Entries” and a “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” are in the associated files. The teacher will use the “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” to formatively assess student knowledge and understanding and provide feedback to students.

4. If the teacher has chosen to do the Read Aloud Component Lesson A, Super Sellers, he/she needs to continue reading the book [Max Malone Makes a Million]by Charlotte Herman. The book can be read at the typical Read Aloud time, or at another convenient time during the day. The teacher should read one chapter a day throughout the unit. The book should be completed by Day 10.

5. It is suggested that the Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] be used with this unit. This Student Web Lesson can be used any day(s) throughout the unit as an introductory lesson, as a practice lesson, or as a review lesson for the standards concerning goods and services

Day 6 – Exciting Exchanges
1. Return scored Summative Assessment #1 to students. Allow time for the students to read teacher feedback and ask questions. Provide correct responses to all assessment items. This will also serve as a review of concepts taught thus far.

2. To gain attention for today’s lesson, go to a far end of the classroom and grab a big purse or shopping bag and put on a pair of walking shoes. Sling the purse/bag over your shoulder and amble to the front of the class. There are loose coins in the purse/bag so make sure you rattle them as you walk from place to place. Then ask, “Guess where I’m going?” Try to elicit from the students that you are going shopping.

3. After the students have determined that the teacher is going shopping, lead them into a discussion about various places to shop. Show them pictures of examples (Ex. Shopping for fruits and vegetables at a stand, shopping for clothes at the mall, shopping for food at the grocery store, shopping for plants at a nursery, etc).

4. Introduce the word market. Using decoding strategies, help the students decode the word and provide a definition for it (Any places or meetings between producers and consumers where goods and services are exchanged, usually for money). Define exchanged (traded, one thing for another). Model examples of exchanges with the students using available objects. Add the words and definitions to the social studies big word board.

5. Remind students that when we want something we usually have to make choices. When we make choices, something has to be given up.

6. Engage students in purposeful listening of the book [Bunny Money] written by Rosemary Wells. Tell them to listen to see if they can name the goods and services the bunnies wanted, the choices they made, what was given up, and what was exchanged.

7. Read the book and guide discussion.

8. As a review, discuss step four of Eco’s puzzle. Ask a student to add it to the class bulletin board.

9. Remind students that their scavenger hunt finds are due tomorrow.

10. Journal entries will be made everyday at a time specified by the teacher. Prompts for “I Mean Business Journal Entries” and a “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” are in the associated files. The teacher will use the “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” to formatively assess student knowledge and understanding and provide feedback to students. Formative feedback should be specific, guiding (I’m sorry, but you have forgotten that a consumer is a person who buys a good or service.) and positive (Yes, when you bought a pencil from the school store you were being a consumer.).

11. If the teacher has chosen to do the Read Aloud Component Lesson A, Super Sellers, he/she needs to continue reading the book [Max Malone Makes a Million]by Charlotte Herman. The book can be read at the typical Read Aloud time, or at another convenient time during the day. The teacher should read one chapter a day throughout the unit. The book should be completed by Day 10.

12. It is suggested that the Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] be used with this unit. This Student Web Lesson can be used any day(s) throughout the unit as an introductory lesson, as a practice lesson, or as a review lesson for the standards concerning goods and services.

Day 7 – Scavenger Hunt
1. Using the Eco the Gecko puppet and puzzle, review all concepts taught thus far. Remind students that due to scarcity of resources people around the world depend upon each other for the exchange of goods and services to meet their wants and needs.

2. Share 2-3 items that were produced in other countries.

3. Using the overhead transparency of a world map (see associated files), designate your home location on the map. Explain to the students that this is where they live.

4. Model how to locate the countries your products are from by using maps in a social studies textbook or other reference book. Note - The teacher could also use a large wall map or globe to show the places the goods came from.

5. Mark the locations of the places your products were produced on the overhead transparency, labeling each accordingly. Draw attention to the distances between your home location and the production locations of the products. Reiterate that people around the world depend on each other for the exchange of goods and services to meet their wants and needs.

6. Encourage each student to tell about where his scavenger hunt find was produced and map the locations on the overhead world map transparency. You might want to assign a number to each student so you can label the location with a number to minimize writing on the small transparency space.

7. When each student has shared, summarize the information there on the map. Use the completed world map transparency to make a class graph of the top 5 countries most of the products were produced in.

8. Encourage students to extend this concept to how people in different places around the world depend upon each other for the exchange of services. Some examples might include medical professionals sharing knowledge and expertise over the Internet, students learning with online student courses, Red Cross teams from other countries helping disaster victims, etc.

9. Review concepts of the day by having a student read piece #5 of the Eco puzzle and place it on the bulletin board. Another student then adds the tail. This completes the Eco the Gecko puzzle.

10. Journal entries will be made everyday at a time specified by the teacher. Prompts for “I Mean Business Journal Entries” and a “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” are in the associated files. The teacher will use the “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” to formatively assess student knowledge and understanding and provide feedback to students. Formative assessment should be specific, guiding, and positive (Your picture has a lot of animals in it, but you forgot to show that a market is any place or meeting between producers and consumers where goods and services are exchanged.) or (Great job! Your picture of a market shows people exchanging goods and services.).

11. If the teacher has chosen to do the Read Aloud Component Lesson A, Super Sellers, he/she needs to continue reading the book [Max Malone Makes a Million]by Charlotte Herman. The book can be read at the typical Read Aloud time, or at another convenient time during the day. The teacher should read one chapter a day throughout the unit. The book should be completed by Day 10.

12. It is suggested that the Student Web Lesson entitled [Busiess Buddies] be used with this unit. This Student Web Lesson can be used any day(s) throughout the unit as an introductory lesson, as a practice lesson, or as a review lesson for the standards concerning goods and services.

Assessments

The Diagnostic Assessment (see extensions)consists of a pretest and K-W-L chart. A pretest is administered to determine prior knowledge. When everyone is finished, the teacher provides the correct answers using the key in the associated files. The students check their own papers. They then use their pretest papers as a springboard for discussion to create a K-W-L chart (a sample K-W-L chart can be found in the associated files). The teacher studies the pretest and K-W-L chart to plan activities to best meet student needs.

Summative Assessment 1 (see extensions) is a performance and constructed response assessment. The student correctly groups pictures according to goods/services and producer/consumer. Then s/he reads stories about scarcity situations. The student determines what is scarce and communicates a choice that could be made to deal with each scarcity situation.

Formative Assessments include the student versions of [ If You Give a Pig a Pancake] and daily student responses to written prompts in My Economic Journal. Specific feedback is given to students throughout the procedures. Feedback should be guiding (I’m sorry. You must’ve forgotten that a Market is any place or meeting between producers and consumers where goods and services are exchanged, usually for money) and positive (That’s right! You remembered that a want is a something a person would like to have.)

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL:
http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2948.
Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

2. These lessons were designed to integrate language arts and social studies content. It is suggested that the teacher combine the language arts time block with the social studies time block for the duration of the unit. Due to the integrated nature of the unit, lesson length may range from 60-90 minutes.

3. Students need to know the difference between needs and wants.

4. Students need background knowledge about community workers.

5. Students need background knowledge about resources (natural, capital, human).

6. A Lesson Plan for a Read Aloud Component is also provided in this unit. The Lesson Plan is entitled Super Sellers. The book [Max Malone Makes a Million] , written by Charlotte Herman, is read daily during Read Aloud time. Students are prompted to listen purposefully each day. Upon completion of the book, students compare and contrast two main characters using a Venn diagram.

7. These lessons were designed to integrate language arts and social studies content. If you would like more information about the Reading Frameworks design, an excellent resource is [The Teacher's Guide to the Four Blocks] by Patricia Cunningham, Dorothy Hall, and Cheryl Sigmon.

8. As an attention grabber, microwaved mini pancakes with maple syrup could be served to students.

9. On Day 7 the teacher may choose to use a large world map instead of the provided transparency of the world.

Web Links

Children learn how crayons are made.
Crayola

Resources for Teachers of Economics
Economic Education

A student lesson about goods and services.
Think Quest Library of Entries - Econopolis

Plant tour showing how M and M candy is produced.
Hershey's

Factory Tour showing how Jelly Bellies are produced.
The Official Jelly Belly Website

A great place for students, parents, and teachers to learn about managing money.
Wise Pockets World

Get information about resources offered by Junior Achievement.
Junior Achievement

This site offers information about Patricia Cunningham's TEACHER'S GUIDE TO FOUR BLOCKS.
The Four Blocks

An online Student Web Lesson that introduces students to the concepts of producers, consumers, goods, and services.
Business Buddies

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.