Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Market Day Adventure

Laurie Ayers
Bay District Schools

Description

Students become immersed in the economic process by participating in this Market Day project. Students produce goods, market goods, and earn “money” to buy goods. They are engaged as both producer and consumer while exploring basic economic concepts.

Objectives

The student understands ways scarcity affects the choices people make in everyday situations.

The student knows the difference between goods and services.

The student knows the difference between consumers and producers.

The student knows examples of economic choices and what is given up when making a choice.

The student understands that work provides income to purchase goods and services.

The student understands the purpose of markets (for example, sellers compete to sell the same or similar products and buyers have choices).

The student understands that people in different places around the world depend on each other for the exchange of goods and services.

Materials

For days 1-7 please see the Beacon lesson plan: Eco the Gecko and the Story of Economics.

Day 8
-Pocket folders, one per group, to be used as a Market Notebook
-Copies of pages to be inserted in Market Notebooks, one per group (in associated file)
-Chart paper for job chart
-Markers to make job chart
-“Play money”
-Poster board, one piece for each group
-Markers or crayons for each group (to make business signs)
-My Economics Journals (used in previous week of this unit)
-[Max Malone Makes a Million] by Charlotte Herman
--Cunningham, Patricia M., Dorothy P. Hall, and Cheryl M. Sigmon. [The Teacher's Guide to the Four Blocks]. Greensboro: Carson-Dellosa, 1999.
-Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] (see Weblinks)

Day 9
-Market Notebooks
-Copy of Summative Assessment 2, Market Day Checklist (see extensions)
-“Play money”
-Market pictures (used previously)
-Six paper plates (8-10 inch)
-Six pairs of food processing gloves
-Two loaves of bread, the same size
-A jar of peanut butter
-Four plastic knives
-One box of sandwich size reclosable, plastic bags
-Materials needed for each group to make its goods (as noted in Market Notebooks on Day 1). Samples and Patterns of Eco the Gecko Products are in the associated file. If students are using these, the teacher needs to download and make copies of them.
-Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] (see Weblinks)

Day 10
-Materials needed for each group to make its goods (as noted in Market Notebooks on Day 1). Samples and Patterns of Eco the Gecko Products are in the associated file. If students are using these, the teacher needs to download and make copies of them.
-Market Notebooks
-Copy of Summative Assessment 2, Market Day Checklist (see extensions)
-“Play money”
-Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] (see Weblinks)

Day 11
-Play money (about 20 bills)
-Twenty safety pins or tape
-“Millionaire Game Question List” (in associated file)
-“Play money” for students who do jobs and for those who answer correctly in the Millionaire Game
-Market Notebooks
-Materials needed for group displays for Market Day (ex. Poster board to make signs advertising their good, business signs, crepe paper streamers for decoration, money box to put money from purchases in, grocery bags to put purchased goods in, sales tally sheets, pencils, calculator to add sales, etc.)
-Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] (see Weblinks)


Day 12
-“Play money”
-Copies of Summative Assessment 3 (see extensions), one per student
-K-W-L chart begun on Day 1 of the I Mean Business Unit
-Marker to write on the chart
-Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] (see Weblinks)

Day 13
-Producer/Consumer Badges (in associated file)
-Construction paper (2 different colors)
-24 inch pieces of yarn, one per student
-Hole punch
-Laminator
-Shopping bags, one per student
-Materials needed by each group as noted in Market Notebooks for Day 4
-Copies of Unit Summative Assessment, one copy per student (see extensions)
-Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] (see Weblinks)

Day 14
-Copies of “Market Day Personal Reflection” (in associated file), one per student
-One large paper grocery bag per student
-Markers or crayons
-Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] (see Weblinks)

Preparations

Day 8
1. Gather materials needed for the lesson.
2. Determine your plan for how the students will produce their goods. (If the students will produce the Eco the Gecko goods provided in this unit, the teacher needs to download the patterns from the associated files and make copies of them for each group.)
3. Determine your plan for paying students for classroom jobs they perform.
4. Create Market Notebooks, one per group. Pages for the notebooks are in the associated file. They will need to be downloaded, copied (one copy of each page per group), and inserted in a pocket folder. Note: It is advised that when printing attachments and extensions for this unit, the teacher specify grayscale as the color option if using a black and white printer.
5. Preview and bookmark the Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies].

Day 9
1. Gather materials needed for the lesson.
2. Clear a workspace in the classroom big enough for three students to make sandwiches on.
3. Set up work areas for each group to begin producing their good.
4. Download and make a copy of Summative 2, Market Day Checklist (see extensions). List students’ names on the checklist.

Day 10
1. Provide necessary accommodations for all groups to be able to complete production of their good.

Day 11
1. Gather materials needed for the lesson.
2. Download and make a copy of the “Millionaire Game Question List” in associated file.
3. Pin or tape dollar bills all over your clothing.

Day 12
1. Download and make copies of Summative Assessment 3 (see extensions).
2. Download and make a copy of the “Scoring Criteria Checklist” for Summative 3 (see extensions).
3. Display the K-W-L chart in a prominent place so that it can be completed as a means of review.

Day 13
1. Make sure all market displays are ready for Market Day.
2. Gather all materials needed for the lesson.
3. Download and make copies of producer/consumer badges (in associated file). The number of copies of each should equal half of the total class enrollment. If possible, reproduce them on different colors of construction paper. Laminate the badges. Punch a hole in the top of them and thread them with a 24-inch piece of yarn. Tie the ends.
4. Download and make copies of Unit Summative Assessment (see extensions), one per student.


Day 14
1. Gather materials needed for the lesson.
2. Download and make copies of the “Market Day Personal Reflection ” (in associated file), one per student.

Procedures

Note - If the teacher has chosen to include the book [Max Malone Makes a Million] as a Read Aloud component of the Reading Framework for this unit, she/he needs to continue to read daily from the book. The teacher displays questions prior to each day’s reading to provide a catalyst for purposeful listening by the students. Sample questions for each chapter can be found in the associated file.

Note - Also, continue to award Scarcity Badges as students identify and share scarcity situations they have encountered each day.

Day 8 – Make and Take

1. Review producers/consumers, markets, and the purpose of markets by asking guiding questions and revisiting the K-W-L chart done on the first day of the unit.

2. Introduce the Market Day project. Explain that students will now get an opportunity to actually be involved in a market process. They will be divided into groups of four. Each group will produce a good (product) to sell at the market on Market Day. During the first session of Market Day, half of the students will be producers and market their goods. The other half will be consumers and buy goods. During the second session, the roles will be reversed. Everyone will get a chance to be both a producer and a consumer. However, in order for the students to be able to buy goods at the market they must work to earn money (income).

3. Lead the students in a discussion about jobs they could do within the classroom setting to earn money. This will be a matter of teacher discretion as to the types of “jobs” the students do. Some suggestions might be:
· turning assignments in on time
· remembering to write names on papers
· completing assignments
· taking turns
· sharing
· passing an AR test
The class determines how much each job is worth and creates a chart listing each job and how much pay the student will receive for it. “Play Money” will then be awarded to students as they accomplish the jobs throughout the week. The teacher uses his/her discretion as to the management of this plan.

4. Also, explain that in order to have goods to sell at the market, each group will create a business to produce some sort of good. Here, depending upon experience and resources, the teacher can be flexible and allow the students to be highly creative and produce creative products using available materials and supplies, or she can predetermine what type products the groups are to make and allow them to randomly choose one of the ideas. The teacher can establish criteria for predetermined products such as:

1. All products must be something that can be used in the classroom.
2. All products must have the Eco the Gecko emblem on them.
3. All products must be made from readily available materials.

Ideas for possible products include: Eco the Gecko pencil toppers and pencils, Eco the Gecko magnet clothespin note holders for the sides of student desks, Eco the Gecko pocket folders, Eco the Gecko milk carton pencil holders, and Eco the Gecko bookmarks. Samples of these items can be found in the associated file. A materials list and directions for making the sample products are as follows:

Eco the Gecko Pencil Toppers
Materials:
-Copies of the Eco the Gecko pencil topper (in associated file)
-Hole punch
-Pencils
-Crayons or markers
-Scissors

Directions:
1. First, color the gecko.
2. Carefully cut out the gecko. Note – If it is difficult for students to cut exactly on the lines, the teacher might encourage students to just cut closely around the edge.
3. Use the hole punch to punch out the holes that the pencil will be inserted into.
4. Insert the pointed end of the pencil into the holes of the pencil topper.
5. Gently slide the topper up to the top end of the pencil near the eraser.

Eco the Gecko Clothespin Magnet Note Holder
Materials:
-Copies of Eco the Gecko to put on the clothespin (in associated file)
-Clothespins
-Adhesive magnet strips
-Crayons or markers
-Scissors
-Glue

Directions:
1. First, color the gecko.
2. Carefully cut out the gecko. Note – If it is difficult for students to cut exactly on the lines, the teacher might encourage students to just cut closely around the edge.
3. Glue the gecko to the clothespin.
4. Cut a strip of adhesive magnet strip and adhere it to the back side of the clothespin.

Eco the Gecko Pocket Folder
Materials:
-Pocket folders
-Copies of pocket folder cover (in associated file)
-Crayons or markers
-Scissors
-Glue or glue sticks
-Other available items that might be used to decorate the folders

Directions:
1. First, color the pocket folder cover sheet.
2. Cut out around the circular edge of the design.
3. Glue the circular design onto the front of the pocket folder.

Eco the Gecko Milk Carton Pencil Holder
Materials:
-Empty student half pint milk cartons cut off at the top around the seam below the opening
-Copies of the sample Pencil Holder (in associated file)
-Crayons or markers
-Scissors
-Glue (glue is recommended because the outside of the milk carton has a waxy coating)
-Other available items that might be used to decorate the pencil holders

Directions:
1. First, color and/or decorate copies of the pencil holder cover.
2. Cut along the outside edges of the pencil holder cover. Note: The teacher may need to model this for the students to ensure that they cut on the appropriate lines.
3. Glue the cover to the outside of the milk carton, overlapping the ends.

Eco the Gecko Bookmark
Materials:
-Copies of the Eco the Gecko Bookmark (in associated file). Print on sturdy paper if possible.
-Crayons or markers
-Eight inch strips of yarn or ribbon to be inserted in the hole at the bottom of the bookmark
-Scissors

Directions:
1. First, color the bookmarks.

2. Cut out the bookmarks around the outside edge.

3. Use a hole punch to punch out the hole at the bottom of the bookmark.

4. Fold the strips of yarn or ribbon in half. Insert the folded end into the hole in the bookmark. Pull them about halfway through the hole. Open the fold and insert the loose ends of the yarn/ribbon. Pull the loose ends until they are tight and a knot is formed at the hole.

5. Explain to the students that as with real markets, they will want to make their product as attractive and appealing as possible for they will be competing with each other for sales. At the end of Market Day, we will tally sales of each group to see who sold the most.

6. Divide students into groups of four. If your students are not accustomed to working in small groups, you will need to provide a mini lesson on appropriate strategies and jobs. Each group is to determine a good to produce and a name for their business, make a business sign, and make a list of the materials they will need to produce their product. These tasks are to be recorded on page 1 in the group Market Day Notebook. One notebook is provided for each group. The notebook is to be turned in so that the teacher can gather necessary materials for production for the next day. Also, the teacher is encouraged to read group responses daily and use these group notebooks as a means of formative assessment throughout the project to help guide instruction.

7. Journal entries will be made everyday at a time specified by the teacher. Prompts for “I Mean Business Journal Entries” and “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” can be found in the extensions for this lesson. The teacher will use the “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” to formatively assess student knowledge and understanding and provide feedback to students.

8. The Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] accompanies this unit. It may be used any day(s) throughout the unit.

Day 9 – Production Pals
1. Review markets and exchange by revisiting the market pictures introduced and discussed on Day 6 of Unit. (See lesson plan: Eco the Gecko and the Story of Economics.) Guide discussion to elicit a review of meanings of producer, consumer, and the purpose of markets.

2. Discuss methods of production (assembly line or unit). In assembly line production each person is given one part of the job. He does only that part. In unit production each person creates the whole item or good. He does everything to produce the final product.

3. Have small groups model these two processes by making peanut butter sandwiches. Note: All students involved in the modeling activities should wear food-processing gloves. These can usually be obtained from the lunchroom manager.

Assembly Line Production –
a. Provide each student with a paper plate to serve as a work area.
b. The first student opens the bread bag and takes the bread out. He gives half of the bread to the third person in the assembly line. Then to start the process, he hands the second person a piece of bread.
c. The second person spreads a layer of peanut butter on the bread. He then passes it to the third student.
d. The third student places another piece of bread on top of the piece with peanut butter and slides it into a zip lock bag.
e. Repeat the process until all the bread has been made into sandwiches.

Unit Production -
a. Divide a loaf of bread evenly among three students.
b. Provide the students with peanut butter, knives, a paper plate to make the sandwiches on, and reclosable, plastic bags.
c. Instruct students to each make sandwiches until all their bread is used up.

4. Allow students to eat the peanut butter sandwiches.

5. Guide students in a discussion to compare the two processes noting possible advantages and disadvantages of each.

6. Divide students into their small groups. Determine what product each group will produce. If the sample Eco products are going to be used, a fair way to do this might be to write the name of each sample product on a small slip of paper, drop the papers into a bag, and let a representative from each group draw one.

7. Give directions for making each product as stated previously in Day 8 procedures.

8. Tell each group they are to determine their method of production, individual jobs if assembly line production is chosen, and how many of their good they hope to produce in two days. The group recorder records these in the group notebook on the first “Production Pals” page.

9. Share a copy of Summative Assessment 2, Market Day Checklist (see extensions) with students and discuss how the checklist will be used to assess their performance on the stated criteria.

10. Each group begins production. The teacher walks around the room and facilitates whenever necessary. She also uses this time to mark individual student performance on Summative Assessment 2, Market Day Checklist (see extensions).

11. Journal entries will be made everyday at a time specified by the teacher. Prompts for “I Mean Business Journal Entries” and “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” are in the associated file. The teacher will use the “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” to formatively assess student knowledge and understanding and provide feedback to students.

12. The Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] accompanies this unit. It may be used any day(s) throughout the unit.


Day 10 Production Pals (cont.)
1. Review production processes (assembly line and unit) by asking students to summarize the two strategies modeled in Day 9 activities.

2. Discuss any possible problems the students might be experiencing.

3. Instruct students to continue production of their good.

4. Remind students that all production will be completed by the end of this session.

5. Students get in their small groups and finish producing their goods for Market Day. The teacher facilitates each group’s production and marks Summative Assessment 2, Market Day Checklist (see extensions), to reflect student performance.

6. Upon completion of production, each group is asked to complete the “Production Pals (cont.)” page in the group notebook. These reflections are read by the teacher as a means of formatively assessing the production process, providing formative feedback to students, and guiding planning for subsequent days.

7. Journal entries will be made everyday at a time specified by the teacher. Prompts for “I Mean Business Journal Entries” and “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” are in the associated file. The teacher will use the “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” to formatively assess student knowledge and understanding and provide feedback to students.

8. The Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] accompanies this unit. It may be used any day(s) throughout the unit.


Day 11 – Millionaire Game
1. The teacher walks to the front of the class with dollar bills pinned all over her/his clothes. She asks, “Who wants to be a millionaire?”

2. The teacher explains that today they will play a “Millionaire Game” to review the unit and to earn more money to spend at Market Day.

3. Divide students into two teams. Students on each team form a line.

4. The teacher asks a review question from the “Millionaire Game Question List” in the associated file.

5. Students that are first in line on each team raise their hands to answer the question.

6. The student who raises his/her hand first gets first try.

7. If the student correctly answers the question, he/she receives a predetermined amount of “money” (to be decided by the teacher based on how well his/her students have done earning money with class jobs).

8. If the first student answers incorrectly, the student on the other team may try. The student who answers correctly gets the money.

9. Those two students go to the end of their team’s line and new players compete.

10. Continue play until all review questions have been answered.

11. Next lead the students in a discussion about elements that are important to the purpose of markets (ex. Attractively displaying products to increase sales, having enough of your product, asking a reasonable price, easy access to your sales location, etc.).

12. Explain the need for a Market Day schedule and job plan from each group.

13. The teacher asks each group to make their plans and record them in the group notebook. She/he also encourages them to list any other materials or assistance they might need to successfully participate in the Market Day activities. The teacher reads the notebooks to gain insight as to how he/she can assist students in their Market Day activities.

14. Groups arrange their Market Day displays, complete with business signs. They complete all necessary arrangements for Market Day.

15. Journal entries will be made everyday at a time specified by the teacher. Prompts for “I Mean Business Journal Entries” and “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” are in the associated file. The teacher will use the “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” to formatively assess student knowledge and understanding and provide feedback to students.

16. The Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] accompanies this unit. It may be used any day(s) throughout the unit.


Day 12 – Decisions, decisions…
1. Remind students that the number of goods each of them will be able to purchase on Market Day will depend upon how much “money” they have earned with their class jobs. Since the resources of both “money” and goods might be limited or scarce, they will have to make choices.

2. Allow students to view the Market Day products and displays. Another option might be to let representatives from each group give a sales pitch about that group’s product. The object of both activities is to familiarize students with available choices.

3. The teacher then uses an overhead transparency of Summative Assessment 3 (see extensions) to model ways choices could be made with various amounts of money and different goods and what is given up when those choices are made. For instance, suppose the teacher has $1.50. She wants to buy two Eco pencil toppers (one for her and one for another teacher) that cost $.50 each, an Eco pencil holder that costs $.50, and an Eco magnet that also costs $.50. She adds up how much all of these items will cost and realizes she doesn’t have enough money. She has to make a choice. She decides to buy one pencil topper, one pencil holder, and one magnet. She gives up buying a pencil topper for the other teacher. The teacher models this thought process using the overhead transparency several times using different amounts of money earned and different choices.

4. Explain to students that since they have been learning about scarcity and making choices, they will now use what they have learned to create a shopping list for Market Day. You will give them a paper just like the one you used on the overhead to help them make their lists.

5. Pass out student copies of Summative Assessment 3 (see extensions).

6. Share the “Scoring Criteria Checklist” to be used with Summative Assessment 3 (see extensions). Discuss the criteria with students.

7. Follow the detailed instructions for administering Summative Assessment 3 (see extensions).

8. Students complete Summative Assessment 3.

9. Remind students that Market Day will be tomorrow. The Unit Summative Assessment (see extensions) will also be administered.

10. As a final review, revisit the K-W-L chart that was begun on Day 1 of the unit. Ask students to share what they have learned. Record and discuss student responses.

11. Journal entries will be made everyday at a time specified by the teacher. Prompts for “I Mean Business Journal Entries” and “ I Mean Business Journal Checklist” are in the associated file. The teacher will use the “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” to formatively assess student knowledge and understanding and provide feedback to students.

12. The Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] accompanies this unit. It may be used any day(s) throughout the unit.



Day 13 – To Market, To Market
Optional – The teacher could enlist the help of a parent volunteer to go around and take pictures of the Market Day experience. Later the class could make a Big Book to summarize the event.

1. Welcome all students to Market Day! Briefly comment on how well the students have worked together to make the project successful.

2. Distribute producer/consumer badges to students and “shopping bags” to students who will be the first consumers.

3. Explain that the students in each group that will be consumers first need to get their “money”, take their lists, and go to the market to shop. The students who are producers go to their group’s display area and man their business (provide services).
Explain Market Day Notebook activity of keeping track of all the sales.

4. After a specified amount of time, the roles reverse. The students who manned the businesses can shop and the students who were the consumers now man the businesses. Students exchange producer/consumer badges. Each student is given the opportunity to be both a producer and a consumer. The second session will be the same predetermined amount of time as the first. The teacher facilitates the process and uses this time to complete Summative Assessment 2, Market Day Checklist (see extensions) for each student.

5. Upon completion of the Market Day, allow ample time for the students to discuss their experience. Guide the discussion by asking questions such as:

Did anyone experience a scarcity situation?
Did anyone have to make an unplanned choice? If so, why? What was given up?
Which good seemed to be most in demand?
Which group had the highest sales?
Which group had the least sales?
What worked well with our Market Day?
What could we have done differently?

6. Later in the day, at an appropriate time, administer the Unit Summative Assessment. Directions for administering this assessment can be found in the assessment portion of the I Mean Business Unit Plan. (See extensions.)

7. Journal entries need to be made after the Market Day Adventure to provide an opportunity for the students to personally reflect upon their experience. Prompts for “I Mean Business Journal Entries” and “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” are in the associated file. The teacher will use the “I Mean Business Journal Checklist” to formatively assess student knowledge and understanding and provide feedback to students.

8. The Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] accompanies this unit. It may be used any day(s) throughout the unit.


Day 14 - Reflections (Optional)
1. As a follow-up activity and real world connection, encourage students to share their Market Day experience with others.

2. Explain that they could write a personal reflection about Market Day.

3. Distribute “Market Day Personal Reflection” forms (in associated file) and large paper grocery bags to the students.

4. Tell students they are to complete the form and glue it to the bottom of the unprinted side of the bag. Next, they are to draw a picture to illustrate their reflection at the top of the bag (unprinted side).

5. Explain that, upon completion, the bags will be taken back to the grocery store for distribution.

6. Allow time for students to complete the activity. Caution: Tell students to put only first names on them.

7. Take up the bags and return them to the grocery store for distribution.

8. The Student Web Lesson entitled [Business Buddies] accompanies this unit. It may be used any day(s) throughout the unit.

Assessments

Formative Assessments include daily student responses to written prompts in “My Economic Journal” and each group’s Market Day Notebook. The teacher will use the journal entries and Market Day Notebook responses as a means of formatively assessing understanding and knowledge. Specific feedback is given to students throughout the procedures. Feedback should be guiding (I’m sorry. You must’ve forgotten that a Market is any place or meeting between producers and consumers where goods and services are exchanged, usually for money) and positive (That’s right! You remembered that a WANT is a thing people would like to have.)

Summative Assessment 2 is the Market Day Checklist (see extensions). It is utilized on Days 9, 10, and 13. The teacher observes student performance and uses the checklist as a means of assessing performance.

Summative Assessment 3 (see extensions) will be administered on Day 12. It is a constructed response assessment that measures student knowledge of examples of economic choices and what is given up when making a choice. The student determines how much “money” he/she has earned and considers the cost and benefits of the goods being sold at the market. The student then decides which goods he/she will purchase and makes a shopping list. Finally, the student writes a short account of his/her economic choices and identifies something given up when making those choices. Criteria for achievement include demonstrating knowledge of examples of economic choices and what is given up when making choices.

The Unit Summative Assessment (see extensions) is administered on Day 13 of “I Mean Business Lesson Plan 2”. It is a constructed and selected response assessment. There are a total of 20 responses; therefore each correct response counts 5 points. Total possible points = 100.

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL:
http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2948.
Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
2. These lessons were designed to integrate Language Arts and Social Studies content. It is suggested that the teacher combine the Language Arts time block with the Social Studies time block for the duration of the unit. Due to the integrated nature of the unit, lesson length may range from 60-90 minutes.
3. These lessons were designed to integrate Language Arts and Social Studies content. If you would like more information about the Reading Frameworks design, an excellent resource is [The Teacher's Guide to the Four Blocks] by Patricia Cunningham, Dorothy Hall, and Cheryl Sigmon.
4. Use saltine crackers instead of bread for the assemby line production.
5. Use a Venn Diagram to show how the production methods on Day 9 were alike and different.
6. Other books such as [A Bargain for Francis] could be substituted for [Max Malone Makes a Million].
7. The class could do a group reflection of Market Day instead of each individual student writing one.

Web Links

Children learn how crayons are made.
Crayola

Resources for Teachers of Economics
Economic Education

Plant tour showing how M and M candy is produced.
Hershey's

Factory Tour showing how Jelly Bellies are produced.
The Official Jelly Belly Website

Get information about resources offered by Junior Achievement.
Junior Achievement

This site offers information about Patricia Cunningham's four blocks strategies.
The Four Blocks

This is an online Student Web Lesson that introduces the concepts of producer, consumer, goods, and services.
Business Buddies

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.