Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Super Sellers

Laurie Ayers
Bay District Schools

Description

Students practice purposeful listening skills by listening to the novel, [Max Malone Makes a Million] written by Charlotte Herman. The book is read aloud to students as part of the “I Mean Business” economics unit.

Objectives

The student listens for information and pleasure.

The student listens for specific details and information (including but not limited to logical sequence and flow of events, story elements, concluding events).

Materials

-Herman, Charlotte. [Max Malone Makes a Million], ISBN 0805023283. New York, Henry Holt, 1991. A copy of this book can be located through SUNLINK at http://www.sunlink.ucf.edu
-Read Aloud Questions for Purposeful Listening (in associated file)
-Venn diagram transparency
-Overhead projector
-Overhead projector markers
-Cunningham, Patricia M., Dorothy P. Hall, and Cheryl M. Sigmon. [The Teacher's Guide to the Four Blocks]. Greensboro: Carson-Dellosa, 1999.

Preparations

1. Gather materials.
2. Download and make a copy of [Max Malone Makes a Million] – Read Aloud Questions for Purposeful Listening” (in associated file).
3. Download and make an overhead transparency of the Venn diagram (in associated file).

Procedures

Note - This is part of the [I Mean Business] unit. It is recommended that this lesson be done as a Read Aloud Component during the time of day that the teacher typically reads aloud to his/her students.

Day 1
1. Hold up a scratch off lottery ticket and ask students if they have ever dreamed of winning the lottery. Would they like to have a million dollars? Allow time for a class discussion.

2. Display a copy of [Max Malone Makes a Million] by Charlotte Herman. Explain that in this book, a young man named Max really wants to make a million dollars.

3. Ask students to predict what Max did to try to make a million dollars.

4. Record student responses on a chart.

5. Tell students you will read a chapter a day throughout the unit. Each day you will post two - three questions before you begin reading. Students are to listen purposefully to find the answers to the questions. Each day when you are finished reading, the class will discuss the answers to the questions.

6. You might want to also share with the students that this book is an Accelerated Reader book and they may get points for passing a test on it.

7. Encourage students to listen and find the answers to the following questions as you read Chapter One:
a. What interesting information did Max find in the Sunday newspaper?
b. What was Max’s plan?

8. Read Chapter One.

9. Elicit the answers for the two previously posed questions from students.

10. Allow ample time for the students to share their reflections on Chapter One.

11. Ask students if their predictions about what Max would do to make money were correct? Discuss.

12. The teacher provides formative feedback to guide students with correct comprehension of the story.

Day 2
1. Remind students that you will be reading [Max Malone Makes a Million] , written by Charlotte Herman.

2. Guide students in reviewing Chapter One.

3. Tell students that today you will be reading Chapter 2.

4. Ask students to listen as you read to find answers for the following questions:
a. According to Rosalie, what was the problem with the recipe?
b. Who is Austin and why won’t Max let him in the business?
c. How did the first batch of cookies turn out?

5. Read Chapter Two.

6. Elicit the answers for the three previously posed questions from students.

7. Allow ample time for the students to share their reflections on Chapter Two.

8. The teacher provides formative feedback to guide students with correct comprehension of the story.

Days 3 – 9.
Continue in a similar manner as Days One and Two, reading a chapter a day of the book [Max Malone Makes a Million] . Pose questions for purposeful listening at the beginning of each reading session. [Max Malone Makes a Million] - Read Aloud Questions for Purposeful Listening” can be found in the associated file.

Day 10
1. Display “play money” dollar bills or coins. Tell students that you know Market Day is fast approaching and you want to give them an opportunity to “earn” some more money for Market Day.

2. Explain to students that they may earn the money by helping you with today’s lesson.

3. Tell them they are to use what they have learned from listening to [Max Malone Makes a Million] to determine successful business strategies. They will do this by comparing and contrasting the business actions of Max and Austin. Each time a student gives an acceptable response, you will give him/her some “money”.

4. Display a Venn diagram transparency on the overhead projector. Identify it as a Venn diagram and tell students that a Venn diagram is often used to compare and contrast two ideas or subjects. Show them how ideas about one topic can be written in the circle on the left, ideas about a different topic can be written in the circle on the right, and ideas that are common to both topics/subjects can be written in the overlapping part in the middle.

5. Ask students to think about Max’s business actions and how he carried them out. Some possible responses might be: 1) He tried to bake cookies even though he had not had much experience baking cookies. 2) He and Gordy drank the lemonade they were trying to sell. 3) He ran out of prizes at the carnival. 4) He looked for shells at the lake. 5) He had limited goods to sell. 6) Max wasn’t very successful at first.

6. Next ask the students to think about Austin’s business actions and how he carried them out. Some possible responses might be: 1) He did something he knew how to do. 2) He drank water instead of the lemonade he was selling. 3) He picked a good spot and was at the right place at the right time. 4) He bought in quantity. 5) Austin was successful.

7. Next, help the students to think of ways the boys were alike in their business ways and actions. Possible responses might include: 1) Both sold goods to earn money. 2) Both made money. 3) Both sold more than one type of good. 4) Both were successful in the end.

8. Guide students in realizing that Max and Austin learned that certain actions helped them be more successful and make more money.

9. If this lesson is being used in conjunction with the Market Day Adventure Lesson Plan, close the lesson by informing students that on Day 12 of the unit they will use what they’ve learned from Max and Austin to think of actions they can take to help them be more successful with their business adventures on Market Day.

10. If this lesson is being used as a stand-alone literature lesson, the teacher could close by involving the students in a variety of extensions. Possible ideas include, but are not limited to: acting out parts of the book, describing the characters and making puppets of them, writing reflections about their favorite part of the book in their journals, making a poster about the book, etc.

Assessments

Use daily class discussions to formatively assess if students are listening purposefully to the selection. Use student responses to guide instruction. For example, if students have missed an important detail, reread part of the chapter and elicit the information from them before moving on.

The students take the Accelerated Reader test for the book [Max Malone Makes a Million] to determine if they have successfully listened purposely. If no AR test is available, create a test to measure achievement of purposeful listening based on the questions provided for each chapter (in associated file).

Extensions

1. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL:
http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2948.
Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

2. Modification – If this book is not available, a similar book could be read in its place.

3. This lesson was designed to integrate Language Arts and Social Studies content. If you would like more information about the Reading Frameworks design, an excellent resource is [The Teacher's Guide to the Four Blocks] by Patricia Cunningham, Dorothy Hall, and Cheryl Sigmon.

Web Links

This site offers information about Patricia Cunningham's book.
The Four Blocks

Attached Files

Max Malone Makes a Million Read Aloud Questions and a Venn diagram.     File Extension: pdf

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