Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Subject Poetry

Julia Balukin

Description

Subject poetry allows students to write creatively using the letters of the subject they are writing about to begin each line. Students will experience presenting their work to the class as well as listening and responding to poetry.

Objectives

The student writes for a variety of occasions, audiences, and purposes (for example, letters to invite or thank, stories or poems to entertain, information to record).

The student listens and responds informally to a variety of oral presentations such as stories, poems, skits, songs, personal accounts, or informational speeches.

Materials

-Subject Poetry Example copied onto transparency (see associated file)
-Teacher's Example copied onto transparency (see associated file)
-Subject Poem Checklist for each student (see associated file)
-Student Response Sheet for each student (see associated file)
-Notebook paper for each student
-Pencils
-Overhead projector, pens and blank transparencies
-*Optional* This website has some great examples of subject poetry written in a 4th grade classroom.
Poetry at http://www.mecca.org/~graham/poetrypost
-Thesaurus for each student if possible

Preparations

1. Make a transparency of the Subject Poem Example (see associated file).
2. Make a transparency of the Teacher Example (see associated file).
3. Make copies of the Subject Poem Checklist for each student (see associated file).
4. Make copies of the Student Response Sheet for each student (see associated file).
5. Have overhead projector, pens and blank transparencies (to create a class subject poem) ready.
6. Bring up the website that shows several examples of children's subject poetry from the website given in the materials section to share with the class.

Procedures

Day 1
1. To begin this lesson you may want to have a subject that you want all students to write their poem about (ie. FLORIDA).

2. Otherwise, begin an open discussion of what students know about subjects. Allow a wide range of ideas for students to think about.

3. Explain to the class that they are going to write a poem that is a about a specific subject. Once they have the subject chosen, explain that each letter within that word (the subject) will be used to begin each of the sentences in the poem.

4. *Optional* This might be a great time to share the website with students to see what other children have written for subject poems. Poetry at http://www.mecca.org/~graham/poetrypost


5. At this time, share with students the two sample poems that were made into overhead transparencies from the associated file.

6. As you show the class the transparencies, be sure to underline the letters at the beginning of the sentences to clarify that the beginning letters spell the subject.

7. Brainstorm ideas with students, of subjects (topics) that they may want to write about, for their subject poetry.

8. Explain that as they write, that students should try and create pictures with the words that they use.

9. Encourage using a thesaurus for ideas and creative language.

10. Encourage students to begin each line with interesting words.

11. At this time, you may want to create a class subject poem together on the overhead to help students fully understand the expectations.

12. Distribute paper and the Subject Poem Checklist to each student and discuss and review the criteria on the checklist (see associated file).

13. Explain that they are to write their rough drafts on the notebook paper while using the checklists as their guide.

14. Read over the checklist with students and then direct them to begin working on their subject poem.

15. Move about the room to assist students as needed. Keep encouraging the use of a thesaurus.

Day2
16. When students have completed their first drafts, have them exchange papers with a peer to edit each others poems.

17. Students will write their final copy of the poem on the Subject Poem Checklist after it has been edited by a peer (see associated file).

18. Provide each student with a copy of the student response sheet and read over it for understanding and clarification.

19. Assign or allow students to choose a classmate that they will write a response sheet for regarding their oral presentations.

20. Give each student an opportunity to read their poetry from the author's chair.

21. Students will turn in their final copy of the subject poem and the student response sheet. These will be used to assess students.

*Allow for an opportunity to give students verbal feedback on their completed poems when returning the evaluated poems.

Assessments

Use the Checklist to assess the students ability to:
-create poetry
-follow a pattern which uses the letters of the subject chosen, at the beginning of the lines, within the poem
-write for the purpose of entertainment

Use the Student Response Sheet to assess the students ability to:
-listen to an oral presentation
-respond to an oral presentation


*The checklist and student response sheet in the associated file will include the criteria for successful completion.

Extensions

Some students may need additional assistance writing their poems. This can be accomplished through creating and working with a peer to help them write a subject poem.

Web Links

Web supplement for Subject Poetry
Poetry

Web supplement for Subject Poetry
Poetry

Web supplement for Subject Poetry
Poetry 4 Kids

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