Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Characters in the Chocolate Factory

Beth Brewington

Description

Books are more interesting when the characters come to life! Students will make creative guesses and compare information about selected characters from the book [Charlie and the Chocolate Factory].

Objectives

The student makes inferences and draws conclusions regarding story elements of a fifth grade or higher level text (for example, the traits, actions, and motives of characters; plot development; setting).

Materials

-A copy of the book [Charlie and the Chocolate Factory] by Roald Dahl, Puffin Books, Penguin Group, 1964
(One copy per student, unless you are using the story as a read aloud.)
-Copy of the Character Prediction Worksheet (See Associated File)
-Copy of the Character Comparison T-Chart Worksheet (See Associated File)
-Pencils
-Chart paper
-Dictionaries

Preparations

1. Make sure that the students have read up to Chapter 24 in the book [Charlie and the Chocolate Factory].


2. Make copies of the prediction worksheet (see associated file) and the T-chart worksheet (see associated file). Each student will need one copy of both worksheets.

3. Select two or three students to dress as familiar storybook characters. Explain that they not only will have to dress like the character, but they will have to act like the character without actually saying who they are supposed to be - the class will have to guess. Some examples:
The Big Bad Wolf, Snow White, Harry Potter, etc.) Ask the students to design their costumes with items that they find at home and then bring to class on the day of the lesson.

4. Find the definitions for the following words: trait, motive, and action. Have dictionaries available for students to use to find definitions.

Procedures

1. Previously selected students enter the classroom dressed as characters from familiar books. The students should be dressed in costumes they made with materials they brought from home.

2. The class participates in a guessing game to figure out the Mystery Characters – ask the class to notice character actions, as well as appearances. Define the words: trait, motive, and action. Ask students to tell about any traits, motives, or actions that they saw in these mystery characters.

3.Once the characters have been recognized, turn the discussion to the characters in [Charlie and the Chocolate Factory]. Make a list of all characters from the story that the students have read about so far. Write (beside the characters’ names) any unusual traits, actions, or motives about these characters.

4.Explain that the class will be reading Chapter 24 today (whole group, partner reading, or read aloud). Before they begin reading, have the students fill out a prediction worksheet (see associated file) to write down what they think will happen to a character in this chapter.

5.Once the prediction worksheet (see associated file) is completed, read Chapter 24 in [Charlie and the Chocolate Factory]. (Whole group, partner reading, or read aloud.)

6.Discuss what happens in Chapter 24. What were the actions and motives seen in this chapter? Did the main character in this chapter have any special traits?

7.Explain to students that they are going to complete a T-chart (see associated file) to compare the traits, motives, and actions of two characters in this book. They may choose any two characters.

8. Discuss the character comparisons created by the students. Collect both worksheets (see associated file) to help in your formative assessment of this activity. Both corrective and affirmative feedback should be given to each student.

Assessments

The teacher will use a Prediction Worksheet, a T-chart worksheet,corrective and affirmative feedback, and teacher observations to formatively assess the student’s ability to:
-Make inferences about a story element.
-Draw conclusions about a story element.
-Recognize the traits, actions, and motives of characters in a story.

Extensions

1. Once the class has finished reading the book [Charlie and the Chocolate Factory], find a copy of the movie version and use it to compare differences in the book characters and the movie characters.

2. ESE students could participate in this activity if the book is taught as a read aloud. Then any student could do a character comparison between the book and the movie.

Web Links

Web supplement for Characters in the Chocolate Factory (Page may load slowly.)
Roald Dahl Official Home Page

Web supplement for Characters in the Chocolate Factory
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.