Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Grab a Handful and Count

Cathy Burgess
Bay District Schools

Description

Students practice counting one-to-one correspondence using Fruit Loops with a partner and then compare them to see who has more or less.

Objectives

The student uses one-to one correspondence to count objects to 100 or more.

The student compares two or more sets (up to 100 objects in each set) and identifies which set is equal to, more than, or less than the other.

Materials

-[Kellogg's Fruit Loops Counting Fun Book], McGrath B, 2000, Harperfestival
-Box of Fruit Loops
-Blank paper
-Teddy bear counters (or any kind of manipulative counters)
-Fruit Loop Assessment Checklist

Preparations

1. Gather box Fruit Loops, blank paper, and teddy bear counters
2. Have the [Kellogg’s Fruit Loop Counting Fun Book] out ready to read.
3. Copy of Fruit Loop Assessment Checklist (for teacher)

Procedures

1. Hold up a box of Fruit Loop cereal. Ask what you normally do with Fruit Loops. Tell students you are going to practice counting today and comparing who has more or less with a partner. (Assure them they will get to nibble on the Fruit Loops as they complete the lesson)

2. Tell students: Let’s read the book [Kellogg’s Fruit Loop Counting Fun Book]. (Discuss each page and count together.) It’s fun to count with food isn’t it? We need to practice counting higher numbers.

3. Scoop out a handful of teddy bear counters and practice counting showing one-to-one correspondence. Have another child do it to right next to yours. Compare your counters. Discuss who has more and who has less. Ask if you think two people could pull out an equal amount?

4. Model for students how this activity will go. Tell students: Have your partner scoop out a handful of Fruit Loops. You do it too. Lay both piles on your paper. Match them, one to one, counting as you go. Compare them to see who pulled more, less or an equal amount?

4. Walk around and observe students formatively using the teacher checklist as students complete the activity. Jot down notes on students who seem to have difficulty, for more practice later in a small group setting. (This could be with the teacher or a paraprofessional.)

5. Encourage students to compare their data. Allow time for discussion and feedback.

Assessments

Through observation and teacher checklist formatively assess the student's ability to:

Use one-to one correspondence to count objects to 100 or more.
Compare two or more sets (up to 100 objects in each set) and identifies which set is equal to, more than, or less than the other.

Extensions

An extension would be to graph how many fruit loops in handful each person scooped out. Compare and contrast handfuls.
Another would be to estimate how many they thought were in their handful before they actually started counting.
Sort by color and then do patterning activities with them.
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