Beacon Lesson Plan Library

You Are What You Eat (High School)

Johnny Wolfe
Santa Rosa District Schools

Description

Numerical Information called data can be useful in our daily lives. A branch of mathematics called statistics provides methods for collecting, organizing, and interpreting data. One way to organize data is by using tables.

Objectives

Interprets data that has been collected, organized, and displayed in charts, tables, plots.

Materials

- Overhead transparencies (if examples are to be worked on overhead) for "You Are What You Eat" . (see associated file)
- Marking pens (for overhead)
- "You Are What You Eat" Examples (see associated file)
- "You Are What You Eat" Worksheet (see associated file)
- "You Are What You Eat" Checklist (see associated file)
-Old newspapers

Preparations

1. Prepare transparencies (if teacher uses overhead for examples) for "You Are What You Eat" Examples(see associated file.)
2. Have marking pens (for overhead.)
3. Have "You Are What You Eat" Examples (see associated file) prepared and ready to demonstrate to students.
4. Have enough copies of "You Are What You Eat" Worksheet (see associated file) for each student.
5. Have enough copies of "You Are What You Eat" Checklist (see associated file) for each student.

Procedures

Prior Knowledge: Students should be familiar with basic operation skills such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and reading tables. Note: Data displayed in charts and plots will not be assessed.

1. Introduce students to the terms data and statistics. Have students name some data that can be found in newspapers (see # 1 on associated file "You Are What You Eat" Examples.) Answer student questions and comments.

2. Give students an example of a table. Go through the table with students making sure they are able to read the headings and their cells. Have students find a statistical chart or graph in a newspaper or magazine. Have them evaluate how the information could have been obtained. Then have the students analyze the chart/graph on its clarity and contents (see # 2 on associated file "You Are What You Eat" Examples.) Answer student questions and comments.

3. Work Example # 3 (see associated file "You Are What You Eat" Examples.) Answer student questions and comments.

4. Work Example # 4 (see associated file "You Are What You Eat" Examples.) Answer student questions and comments.

5. Discuss with students where data comes from (see # 5 on associated file "You Are What You Eat" Examples.) Answer student questions and comments.

6. Work Example # 6 (see associated file "You Are What You Eat" Examples.) Answer student questions and comments.

7. Work Example # 7 (see associated file "You Are What You Eat" Examples.) Answer student questions and comments.

8. Distribute the "You Are What You Eat" Worksheet. (see associated file)

9. Distribute the "You Are What You Eat" Checklist(see associated file.)Describe what is expected for acceptable performance from the students by following the chekclist.

10. The students will write their responses on the worksheet.

11. Move from student to student observing the students work and lending assistance.

Assessments

The student worksheets will be collected and scored according to the "You Are What You Eat" Checklist (see attached file.)

Extensions

Give students information and have them organize it into a chart or table.

Web Links

Web supplement for You Are What You Eat
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