Beacon Lesson Plan Library

We're Alike, We're Different!

Lore Davis
Alachua County Schools

Description

This is a small group activity in which students compare a variety of people counters to determine how they're alike and different and then sort, classify and write about how they sort and classify people counters.

Objectives

The student dictates or writes with pictures or words/letters a narrative about a familiar experience or text.

Materials

-Copy of the book [We're All Alike, We're All Different]Cheltenhona Elementary School Kindergartners. [We're All Alike, We're All Different]. New York: Scholastic Trade, 2002.
-7 bowls of 20 people counters in 4 colors and 3 sizes
(These are available through many teacher catalogs like Lakeshore Learning Materials, 2695 E. Dominguez St., Carson, CA 90749, 1-800-421-5454, and Childcraft Education Corp., P.O. Box 3239, Lancaster, PA 17604, 1-800-631-5652
-7 sorting trays
-One piece of 12 by 9 inch white construction for each child and four pieces the same size for teacher use in modeling the writing portion of the activity
-6 packages of colored pencils
-6 pencils

Preparations

1. Obtain a copy of the book [We're All Alike, We're All Different] (see materials list)
2. Prepare 7 bowls of 20 people counters in 4 colors and 3 sizes. (These are available through many teacher catalogs like Lakeshore Learning Materials, 2695 E. Dominguez St., Carson, CA 90749, 1-800-421-5454, and Childcraft Education Corp., P.O. Box 3239, Lancaster, PA 17604, 1-800-631-5652.)
3. Secure 7 sorting trays.
4. Obtain one piece of 12 by 9 inch white construction for each child and four pieces the same size for teacher use in modeling the writing portion of the activity
5. Obtain 6 packages of colored pencils.
6. Obtain 6 pencils.

Procedures

1. While working with a small group of students, tell students that today they will be comparing how they're alike and how they're different. Tell students to look around the table and think about how the group is alike. Next, ask students to raise their hands and tell the group how they're all alike (Example: They're all people, they all have hair, they all have legs and arms). with black hair to stand in a line by the table. Have all students count the number of students with black hair. Then, have students raise their hands to tell how they are different (Example: hair color, skin color, boys, girls). Have students pick one of the characteristics and get into groups (Example: boys in one group, girls in another). Tell students they just sorted or grouped themselves by boys and girls.

2. Read the book [We're All Alike, We're All Different]. Have students tell you how the people in the story are alike and different prior to reading each page.

3. After reading the story, pour a bowl of people counters out onto the table. Have students look at the counters and tell how they can be sorted or grouped. One student may say the counters could be sorted by size. Have that student choose a size people counter and place all that size counters in one slot in the sorting tray. Next, have another child sort another size and then another child sort the last size. Divide a piece of 12 by 9 inch construction paper into three sections. Tell students that they have just sorted the people counters by size. Make a record of the sort by drawing the number of each size people counter in each section of the paper. Model writing the number in each section and write a sentence telling about the way you sorted each group (Example: I sorted the people by size. I have 5 little people. I have 10 middle size people. I have 5 big people).

4. Tell students that they will now sort or group their own container of people counters. Give each student a container of 20 people and a sorting tray. Students will work independently to sort the counters. Observe, monitor and provide corrective feedback as students sort the counters. Give suggestions or ask other students to give suggestions of other ways to sort, if a child can't think of alternative ways to sort. Have students demonstrate their understanding by explaining how they sorted.

5. Have students make a record of one way they sorted by illustrating it on construction paper and writing about how they sorted. Most kindergarteners will use pictures as their writing and will tell you about the way they sorted and classified. Some might label their pictures with one or two letters. Most will not be able to write a sentence. You may write as the student dictates. Formatively assess the student product to determine if the standard has been met. Provide corrective feedback as needed.

6. The students will return to the small group to share the writing, explaining one way he/she sorted and classified the vehicles after each student has finished the activity.

Assessments

The student demonstrates his/her knowledge of sorting and classifying by using at least 2 characteristics (size, color) to sort the people counters.
The student dictates or writes with pictures or words about how he/she sorts and classifies people counters. Teacher would use a cheklist to assess students ability to sort materials and manage information.

Extensions

1. Science/math - Read a book about pets. Have students share what kind of pets they have. Give students a 3 by 3 inch square of construction paper and have them draw a picture of their pet. Next, have students sort their pictures by the kind of pet (dog, cat, bird). Have students sort by other characteristics (pets that live in the water, pets that live on land).
2. Math - Have students graph how they're different. For example, they could make a graph to show how many students have blonde, brown or black hair.
3. Social Studies - Read a book about how families are alike or different. Have students raise their hands if they have a mom and dad in their home. Continue like this to ask for families that have only one parent living with them, grandparents living with them, etc.
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