Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Just the Facts

Janice Jowers
Okaloosa County Schools

Description

The students read a story and determine if the example sentences about the story are facts or opinions. They then demonstrate their proficiency in assessing whether sample sentences are facts or opinions.

Objectives

The student knows the difference between a fact and an opinion.

Materials

-The story -Cookies Disappear- (found in Associated File)
-Overhead projector
-The Cookies Disappear Fact and Opinion Example Sentences (found in Associated File)
-The Fact and Opinion worksheet (found in Associated File)
-The Fact and Opinion worksheet answer key (found in Associated File)
-A pencil for the children to record their responses.
-Art supplies for the children to illustrate one of the sentences.

Preparations

· Download the materials from the Associated Files.
· Make a copy of the -Cookies Disappear- story to use on the overhead projector.
· Make copies of the Fact and Opinion worksheet (found in Associated Files) for the students’ responses. Make one copy for each student.
· Make sure the overhead projector is in position to project on the screen.
· Make sure each child has a pencil and art supplies.

Procedures

1. Position the overhead projector ahead of time so all the children can see the story projected on the screen.

2. Project the story -Cookies Disappear- (see Associated File) on the overhead projector.

3. Read and discuss the story with the students.

4. Explain to the students that some sentences state facts and other sentences state opinions. A fact is something that is real or true. An opinion is what a person thinks about something.

5. Read the sentences from the Cookies Disappear Fact and Opinion Example Sentences (found in Associated Files) and discuss with the students whether they state a fact or an opinion. Have the students elaborate on how they know whether the sentence is fact or opinion.

6. Emphasize that a fact is something real or true and an opinion is what somebody thinks.

7. Hand out the Fact and Opinion worksheet (found in Associated Files).

8. Model for the students how they are to read each sentence and determine if it is a fact or an opinion.

9. The students complete the rest of the sentences, circling the F if it is a fact and the O if it is an opinion.

10. The students illustrate one of the opinion sentences at the bottom of the paper.

Assessments

Look at the Fact and Opinion worksheet that the children have completed (found in Associated Files.) The students should complete this paper with 80% accuracy for mastery. Students who do not demonstrate mastery need feedback and additional practice time.

Extensions

Extensions
Have the students turn their Fact and Opinion worksheet over and write two sentences of their own, one stating a fact and one stating an opinion. Illustrate these sentences.
Modifications
The students who have difficulty reading should work with a partner to make sure they read the words correctly to enhance their comprehension of this reading skill.

Web Links

Web supplement for Just the Facts
ABC Teach

Web supplement for Just the Facts
Mrs. Dowling’s Reading Comprehension Terms

Web supplement for Just the Facts
Reading Comprehension on Standardized Tests

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