Beacon Lesson Plan Library

The Changing Map of Europe

Chet Geering

Description

Students will be able to process a variety of information and explain the differences on the map of Europe in 1914 and in 1936.

Objectives

The student analyzes major historical events of the first half of the 20th century.

Materials

- Class copies of WORLD HISTORY THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE. New York: Glencoe McGraw-Hill, 2001. (or comparable text).
-Pencil for each student
-Paper for each student
-Access to copy machine.
-European Map 1914 (See weblink)
-European Map 1937 (See weblink)
-Dry erase board and markers
-List of short answer questions (See attached file)
-Access to the Internet.

Preparations

1. Read text Chapter 26 (or appropriate chapter).
2. Look through the procedure listing and make sure you are familiar with the terms listed within.
3. Make copies of the enclosed questions.
4. Go to listed weblinks to get 1914 and 1937 maps.
5. Make copies of maps in #4 for students.

Procedures

1. Have students read chapter 26 in text (or comparable chapter from another text) the night before.

2. Explain to students the boundaries of countries are not static. They have changed many times throughout the ages.

3. Ask students, -Why do the boundaries of countries change?- (Answer: Answers may vary. The desired answers are war and treaties.)

4. Record the answers on the board.

5. Pass out the map of Europe in 1914 to students. (See weblink.)

6. Review the map with students.

7. Pass out map of Europe in 1937 to students. (See weblink.)

8. Review the map with students.

9. Ask students to list countries that are on the 1914 map but not on the 1936 map. (Answers should include the following: Austria-Hungary, Ottoman Empire, Serbia, Montenegro, and the Russian Empire.)

10. Ask students, -What do you think happened to these countries?- (Answers will vary.)

11. Discuss #10 with students.

12. Ask the students to list countries that are on the 1937 map but not on the 1914 map. (Answers should include the following: Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Austria, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia.)

13. Ask students, -Why would a new country be created?- (Answers will vary.)

14. Discuss #13 with students and record answers on the board.

15. Ask students, -Why have the boundaries of some countries changed?- (Answer: Boundaries have changed because of war and treaties.)

16. Record the answers on the board.

17. Ask students, -How would a change in the boundaries of countries contribute to a war?- (Answers: Changes in boundaries will often stir feelings of nationalism, which will often lead to war.)

18. Record the answers on the board.

19. Ask students, -From what you have read in the text did the changing of the map of Europe help prevent war or contribute to a new war?- (Answers will vary. Have students justify their answers with facts from the text.)

20. Discuss answers from #19 with students.

21. Assign the enclosed questions.

22. Review the maps and the answers to the questions the following day.

23. Teacher evaluates answers.

Assessments

1. Students will be graded on their answers to the series of short answer questions provided.
2. The teacher can also informally evaluate the students by encouraging class participation and discussion by as many students as possible.

Web Links

Web supplement for The Changing Map of Europe
Historical Atlas of the Twentieth Century

Web supplement for The Changing Map of Europe
Europe, 1914

Web supplement for The Changing Map of Europe
Europe, 1935

Attached Files

The list of short-answer questions on maps of Europe     File Extension: pdf

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