Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Measures of Central Tendency (High School)

Johnny Wolfe
Santa Rosa District Schools

Description

In analyzing, statistical data, measures of central tendency are used because they represent centralized data.

Objectives

Interprets data that has been collected, organized, and displayed in charts, tables, plots.

Calculates measures of central tendency (mean, median, mode)and dispersion (range, standard deviation, and varience) for complex sets of data and determines the most meaningful measure to describe the data.

Materials

- Overhead transparencies (if examples are to be worked on overhead) for Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples (see attached file).

- Marking pens (for overhead).

- Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples (see attached file).

- Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Worksheet (see attached file).

- Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Worksheet Key (see attached file).

- Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Checklist (see attached file).

Preparations

1. Prepare transparencies (if teacher uses overhead for examples) for Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples (see attached file).

2. Have marking pens (for overhead).

3. Have Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples (see attached file) prepared and ready to demonstrate to students.

4. Have enough copies of Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Worksheet (see attached file) for each student.

5. Have enough copies of Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Checklist (see attached file) for each student.

Procedures

Prior Knowledge: Students should be familiar with basic operation skills such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, exponents, fractions, decimals, and reading graphs. NOTE: This lesson does not address dispersion (range, standard deviation, and variance).

1. Ask students for the purpose of finding an average (see # 1 on attached file Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples). Answer student questions and comments.

2. Introduce students to “measures of central tendency” and why we use them (see # 2 on attached file Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples).

3. Go over the definition of a “mean” (see # 3 on attached file Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples). Answer student questions and comments.

4. Work example # 4 (see attached file Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples). Answer student questions and comments.

5. Go over THOUGHT PROVOKER (see # 5 on attached file Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples). Answer student questions and comments.

6. Work example # 6 from Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples (see attached file). Answer student questions and comments.

7. Work example # 7 from Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples (see attached file). Answer student questions and comments.

8. Go over definition of a median (see # 8 on attached file Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples). Answer student questions and comments.

9. Work example # 9 from Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples (see attached file). Answer student questions and comments.

10. Have students discuss in example #10 which is a better measure of central tendency for example 9 above (see attached file Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples). Answer student questions and comments.

11. Go over THOUGHT PROVOKER (see # 11 on attached file Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples). Answer student questions and comments.

12. Work example # 12 from Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples (see attached file). Answer student questions and comments.

13. Work example # 13 from Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples (see attached file). Answer student questions and comments.

14. Go over definition of a mode (see # 14 on attached file Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples). Answer student questions and comments.

15. Go over THOUGHT PROVOKER (see # 15 on attached file Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples). Answer student questions and comments.

16. Go over THOUGHT PROVOKER (see # 16 on attached file Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples). Answer student questions and comments.

17. Work example # 17 from Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples (see attached file). Answer student questions and comments.

18. Work example # 18 from Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Examples (see attached file). Answer student questions and comments.

19. Distribute the Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Worksheet (see attached file).

20. Distribute the Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode Checklist (see attached file). Describe what constitutes an “A,” “B,” “C,” “D,” and an “F” in the CHECKLIST.

21. The student will write their response on the worksheet.

22. The teacher will move from student to student observing the students work and lending assistance.

Assessments

Student worksheets will be taken up and scored according to “Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, Median, and Mode checklist”. These scores may be placed in the grade book

Extensions

Give the students the mean, median and mode. Have them come up with a set of data that these three describe.

Web Links

Web supplement for Measures of Central Tendency
Measures of Central Tendency

Web supplement for Measures of Central Tendency
Central Tendency

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