Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Probability and Compound Events

Johnny Wolfe
Santa Rosa District Schools

Description

Students determine the probability of compound events.

Objectives

Interprets data that has been collected, organized, and displayed in charts, tables, plots.

Determines the probability for simple and compound events as well as independent and dependent events.

Materials

- Overhead transparencies (if examples are to be worked on overhead) for Probability and Compound Events (See Associated File)
- Marking pens (for overhead)
- Probability and Compound Events Examples (See Associated File)
- Probability and Compound Events Worksheet (See Associated File)
- Probability and Compound Events Checklist (See Associated File)

Preparations

1. Prepare transparencies (if teacher uses overhead for examples) for Probability and Compound Events Examples. (See Associated File)
2. Have marking pens (for overhead).
3. Have Probability and Compound Events Examples (See Associated File) prepared and ready to demonstrate to students.
4. Have enough copies of Probability and Compound Events Worksheet (See Associated File) for each student.
5. Have enough copies of Probability and Compound Events Checklist (See Associated File) for each student.

Procedures

Prior Knowledge: Students should be familiar with basic operation skills such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, exponents, fractions, and decimals.
NOTE: This lesson does not address dependent events.

1. Describe to students the difference between simple and compound events. (See #1 on Probability and Compound Events Examples) Answer student questions and comments.

2. Work #2 Example. (See Probability and Compound Events Examples) Introduce students to tree diagrams. Also, remind students that the answer may be written in different forms (fractions, decimals, etc.). Answer student questions and comments.

3. Work #3 Example. (See Probability and Compound Events Examples) Answer student questions and comments.

4. Work #4 Example. (See Probability and Compound Events Examples) Answer student questions and comments.

5. Work #5 Example. (See Probability and Compound Events Examples) Answer student questions and comments.

6. Have students explain why the tree diagrams are the same for Examples #4 and #5. (See #6 on Probability and Compound Events Examples)

7. Work #7 Example. (See Probability and Compound Events Examples) Answer student questions and comments.

8. Distribute the Probability and Compound Events Worksheet. (See Associated File)

9. Distribute the Probability and Compound Events Checklist. (See Associated File) Describe what constitutes an A, B, C, D, and F in the Checklist.

10. The students write their responses on the worksheet.

11. The teacher moves from student to student, observing the students' work and lending assistance.

Assessments

The student worksheet is collected and scored according to the Probability and Compound Events Checklist. (See Associated File)

Extensions

Have students create a tree diagram for a die and a tossed coin. Then divide the students into pairs and have them toss a die and a coin (recording their results). Bring the students together and record their results.

Web Links

Web supplement for Probability and Compound Events
Math Helps: Probability

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