Beacon Lesson Plan Library

U.S. Enters WW II

Chet Geering

Description

Students process a variety of information on how the U.S. became involved in World War II. They are then asked to answer a series of short-answer questions on the topics discussed in class.

Objectives

The student knows the origins and effects of the involvement of the United States in World War II.

Materials

-[World History The Human Experience]. New York: Glencoe McGraw-Hill, 2001. (Or comparable text)
-Teacher Notes (See Associated File)
-Student copies of Questions On U.S. Involvement (See Associated File)
-Dry erase board and dry erase markers

Preparations

1. Read text Chapter 20 (or appropriate chapter).
2. Look over Teacher Notes (See Associated File) to be sure you are familiar with the material.
3. Make one copy of the Questions On U.S. Involvement (See Associated File) for each student.

Procedures

1. Ask students, “What is an underlying cause?”

2. Put the definition on the board.

3. Explain to the students that World War II was fought in two theaters. The Pacific and the Atlantic.

4. Ask students, “Can you name one underlying cause for U.S. involvement in the Pacific Theater during World War II?” (One possible answer: “American racism towards Japan.”)

5. Ask students, “What is racism?”

6. Put their answers on the board.

7. Ask students, “How can racism push two nations towards war?”

8. Discuss the responses with students.

9. Discuss the Gentleman’s Agreement in the 1920’s with the students.

10. Ask students, “Can you name another underlying cause for U.S. involvement in the Pacific Theater during World War II?” (Possible answer: “Japanese Militarism.”)

11. Ask students, “What is militarism?”

12. Put their answers on the board.

13. Discuss the responses with students.

14. Discuss how militarism would play a part in starting a war.

15. Ask students, “Can you name another underlying cause for U.S. involvement in the Pacific Theater during World War II?” (Another possible answer: “Japanese Militarism.”)

16. Ask students, “What is Economic Imperialism?”

17. Put their answers on the board.

18. Discuss the answers with students.

19. Ask students, “What was the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere?”

20. Discuss the answers with students.

21. Ask students, “How did this Sphere contribute to World War II?”

22. List the answers on the board.

23. Ask students, “What is the last underlying cause for U.S. involvement in the Pacific Theater in World War II?” (The last response should be “U.S. cuts off trade with Japan because of Japan’s war with China.”)

24. Ask students, “What vital exports did the U.S. stop selling to Japan?”

25. Put the answers on the board.

27. Ask students, “How would Japan get the raw materials it needed to feed its economy?” Discuss with students. Put answers on the board.

28. Review the underlying causes for U.S. involvement in the Pacific Theater during World War II with the class.

29. Ask students, “What is an immediate cause?”

30. Put the definition on the board.

31. Ask students, “What was the immediate cause that forced U.S. involvement in the Pacific Theater during World War II?

32. Put their answers on the board.

33. Discuss the immediate cause with the students.

34. Ask students, “Was the Japanese attack justified? Why or why not?” Discuss the answers with the students.

35. Pass out the short-answer questions to the students. (See Associated File)

36. Evaluate short-answer responses.

Assessments

1. Students are assessed by answering a series of short-answer questions on the topics covered in class.
2. The teacher can also informally evaluate the students by monitoring and encouraging their participation in class discussion.
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