Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Gone to the Dogs

Janice Jowers
Okaloosa County Schools

Description

The students learn how to decode words by breaking multi-syllable words into basic syllables and counting those syllables. The children then play a station activity game that builds vocabulary and practices decoding multi-syllable words.

Objectives

The student uses a variety of spelling strategies (for example, knowing root words, prefixes, and suffixes; using word families, syllabication).

Materials

-The dog food bowls for the Gone to the Dogs folder activity game (See Associated Files)
-A copy of the Gone to the Dogs words for the folder activity game (See Associated Files)
-A copy of the dog bones on which to glue the Gone to the Dogs words for the folder activity game (See Associated Files)
-A set of four file folders to use to make the folder games for the station activities
-Four answer keys to use with the Gone to the Dogs activity game (See Associated Files)

Preparations

1. Download the materials from the Associated Files.
2. Write the example words on the board. (See answer key in the Associated Files for choices of words.)
3. Prepare the four file folder games by printing four copies of the Gone to the Dogs activity game (found in Associated Files) and gluing them inside four opened file folders. Print four copies of the Gone to the Dogs game words (found in Associated Files), cut them apart and glue or tape each word on one of the dog bones (found in Associated Files). There will be one set of words for each file folder game board. You might want to laminate the file folder game and the cards so that they will last longer.
4. Print four copies of the answer key (see Associated Files) to be used with the game to make it self-checking. Laminate the answer key so that it will last longer.

Procedures

1. Prepare the four Gone to the Dogs file folder games (see Teacher Preparation for directions) to include the dog food bowls (see Associated Files), the bones with the words (see Associated Files), and answer keys (see Associated Files).

2. Write One Syllable, Two Syllables, Three Syllables, and Four Syllables on the board. Choose an example of each multi-syllabled words to write on the board. (See Associated Files Answer Key for examples of words from which to choose.)

3. Demonstrate to the students how to divide these words into syllables and count how many syllables they have. Write the words under the correct heading on the board.

4. Elaborate on this concept by having the students share words they can think of that have one, two, three, or four syllables. Write their words under the correct heading. Show students how much easier it is to pronounce and spell the words if they can divide them into syllables first.

5. Explain to the students that when they go to the language learning station they will play a game called Gone to the Dogs. To play the game, they draw a card with a word on it and decide if the word has one, two, three, or four syllables. They place the word card in the correct dog bowl. At the end of the activity, when all the word cards have been placed in dog bowls, the students use the answer key to see if they were correct.

6. Place the Gone to the Dogs folder activity game, complete with the word cards and answer key, in the Language Station for the students to complete at station activity time. Have students return to their seats.

7. Choose a couple of the two or three syllable words. Say them aloud, stressing each syllable and write the word on the board by syllables as you say them. Encourage all students to have input. Tell students to take out a sheet of paper. Choose five of the two-syllable or three-syllable words from the words used at the station. Instruct the students to write the words in syllables as you say them. Repeat each word twice, stressing the syllables.

8. Assess the activity. (See Assessment.)

Assessments

The teacher should observe the children as they play the Gone to the Dogs activity game. The students should identify how many syllables each word has with 80% accuracy. Students not scoring 80% accuracy should be retaught and reassessed. Assess the five words that students wrote. Check to make sure that they were able to write the syllables, even if they did it phonetically. Students who have difficulty will need much practice.

Extensions

Extensions
Have the students write their own words and place their words on extra copies of the dog bones. These words should have one, two, three, or four syllables. Have the children write the number of syllables on the back of the dog bones. The teacher should check the cards to be sure that they are correct. Let the children use their own words the next time that they play this game.

Modifications
The students who have difficulty reading should work with a partner to make sure that they read the words correctly to enhance their comprehension of this reading skill.

Web Links

Web supplement for Gone to the Dogs
Counting Syllables

Web supplement for Gone to the Dogs
Clap and Count

Web supplement for Gone to the Dogs
Counting Syllables 2

Web supplement for Gone to the Dogs
Clap and Count

Figure out how many syllables there are in the words presented. Select your answer from the pop-up menu.
Counting Syllables

Learn what a syllable is and practice figuring out how many syllables there are in a particular word.
Counting Syllables

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