Beacon Lesson Plan Library

What Do You Think?

Janice Jowers
Okaloosa County Schools

Description

The story, THE PAIN AND THE GREAT ONE, written from two different points-of-view, is read to the children. The students then read statements made by the characters in the book and identify from which character's point-of-view the statement was made.

Objectives

The student reads and discusses literature with differing viewpoints to enhance perspective.

Materials

- THE PAIN AND THE GREAT ONE by Judy Blume, illustrated by Irene Trivas, Yearling Books, 1974.
- A copy of the Introduction Point-of-View statements, to teach point-of-view, on an overhead sheet (see Associated File)
- Overhead projector
- Worksheet to check comprehension of point-of-view as related to the story (see Associated File)

Preparations

- Obtain a copy of THE PAIN AND THE GREAT ONE by Judy Blume
- Prepare an overhead copy of the Introduction Point-of-View statements (see Associated File)
- Make enough copies of the Point-of-View worksheet (see Associated File) for each student to have a copy.

Procedures

1. Read THE PAIN AND THE GREAT ONE by Judy Blume aloud to the students.

2. Explain that the story is written from two different points-of-view. The first half is written from the older sisterís point-of-view. The second half is written from the younger brotherís point-of-view.

3. Show the Introduction Point-of-View statements (see Associated File) based on the text of the story on the overhead projector. Discuss with the students whose point of view each statement is expressing.

4. Explain how things can look different depending on your point-of-view.
- Distribute the Point-of-View worksheet (see Associated File) for the students to complete.

Assessments

Use the Point-of-View worksheet to assess the studentsí understanding of viewpoint. The students should complete the worksheet with 80% accuracy. Students not scoring 80% accuracy should be retaught and reassessed.

Extensions

Extensions
The students should write statements, which show each of the characters' points of view about one another. They should include the Pain, the Great One and Mom or Dad. The students could illustrate their sentences.
Modifications:
The students who have difficulty reading should work with a partner to enhance their comprehension of this reading skill.

Web Links

Web supplement for What Do You Think?
Newspaper Activities Support Children's Learning

Web supplement for What Do You Think?
Reading Comprehension on Standardized Tests

Web supplement for What Do You Think?
Connie Prevatteís Theory Into Practice

Web supplement for What Do You Think?
Key Comprehension Teachers’ Notes

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