Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Geo Jammin' - Day 3, Lesson 10: Patterned Poetry

Katie Koehnemann
Bay District Schools

Description

Through comparing and contrasting related two- and three-dimensional shapes, students complete a Venn diagram illustrating the attributes of each. Using a poem pattern from another lesson, students use data from the diagram to write an attribute poem.

Objectives

The student writes for familiar occasions, audiences and purposes (including but not limited to entertaining, informing, responding to literature).

The student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles).

The student describes attributes of three-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, vertices, edges, faces, angles).

The student sorts two- and three-dimensional figures according to their attributes.

Materials

-Venn diagram made on the chalkboard or large piece of butcher paper
-Shapes for students to compare and contrast (Since triangle/pyramid were the modeled poetry pair in Lesson 9, Attribute Attitude, and cube was presented alone, it is suggested students compare and contrast a cube and square and then write a poem for the square to pair with the already written poem for the cube.)
-Chart paper for recording the students’ poem
-Colored markers
-Hands-on manipulative for each student (flat square and cube manipulative)
-Charted poem patterns from Lesson 9, Attribute Attitude
-Charted poems from Lesson 9, Attribute Attitude
-An Assessment Management Tool for each student (See Associated Files in the Unit Plan)

Preparations

1. Decide shape to write about.
2. Display poem patterns. (Lesson 9, Attribute Attitude)
3. Display other attribute poems. (Lesson 9, Attribute Attitude)
4. Gather sufficient comparative manipulatives, such as cut paper squares and cubes, for all students to have.
5. Prepare chart paper for recording.
6. Gather colored markers.
7. Provide space for making a Venn diagram. (Chalkboard, butcher paper, etc.)
8. Print out copies of the Literacy Link parent page (See Associated File) for students to take home.
9. Use the Assessment Management Tool to record student formative assessment results. (See Associated Files in the Unit Plan)
10. Associated File contains:
Sample of a completed Venn diagram (Cube and Square)
Venn diagram for Rectangle and Rectangular Solid
Venn diagram for Circle and Cylinder
Literacy Link parent page

Procedures

NOTE: In this lesson plan, the cube and square will be used with the assumption that students will be writing a Square poem to pair with the Cube poem presented in Lesson 9, Attribute Attitude.

1. Explain that the class is writing a poem for a square using one of the poem patterns presented in Lesson 9, Attribute Attitude.

2. Explain that to write the poem, they need to use attribute words for a square. To start, think about what is alike and what is different about a two-dimensional square and a three-dimensional cube.

3. To keep the attribute words organized as the class brainstorms, draw a Venn diagram on chalkboard or butcher paper.

4. Label the diagram. (See Associated File for a completed sample)

5. Hand out to each student a square printed on a sheet of paper and a cube.

6. Guide students in comparing and contrasting the two related shapes. Solicit from the students likenesses and differences. Formative assessment occurs as students use correct mathematical language to note the likenesses and differences between the cube and square. Listen for students to demonstrate use of correct attribute words that associate with and describe each as they tell you what should be written in the Venn diagram.
*For example, a student may suggest the square has only one flat surface where as the cube has lots of surfaces. In this case feedback should be a question such as, “What do we call the surfaces of a three-dimensional object?” The response should be “face.” (See Associated File for a completed sample) Provide positive and corrective feedback as students work with manipulatives and make/share observations.

7. As students discuss what they see, lead them to decide if it is something only the cube has, only the square, or is it something that both the cube and square have. Ask, “Where on the Venn diagram should it be recorded?” Through questioning, assist students to correctly identify where on the Venn diagram each attribute should be recorded. Record all student responses on the diagram.

8. Direct students’ attention to the poem pattern to follow to write their poem. (You may decide this or ask students which one they would like to follow.)

9. (See Option in Extensions) Instruct students to use the data on the Venn diagram for correct usage of attribute words in writing the poem to describe a square. Encourage creative thinking and pulling from their background knowledge to build the poem together. Record as students create. If students make changes, or revisions, in their work, simply cross out, showing all work and thinking processes on the chart paper. When the poem is complete, it can be rewritten neatly, but it is good for students to see the thinking and creating process in writing.

10. When the poem is complete, have Geo George appear so the class can read their poem to him. They can read it in unison, boy and girl parts, one side of the room vs. the other side of the room, put motion to it, etc.

Assessments

Student understanding of and the ability to sort and describe two- and three-dimensional shapes by attribute will be formatively assessed as students brainstorm likes and differences between the related pair and state their ideas using correct mathematical language to complete the Venn diagram. As students create a descriptive poem using attribute words, a demonstration of and an even more concise assessment of students’ understanding will be displayed through their use of personal background knowledge and how they use that knowledge in a creative way to develop the poem.

Extensions

1. Option: After completing the Venn diagram together, and if you feel students have a clear understanding of the poem pattern(s), you may want to place them in small groups, having each group create their own poem. Allow time for reading aloud of each group’s poem to Geo George and others.
2. In Lesson 9, Attribute Attitude, students were given the comparative poems for triangle and pyramid, and they have just written the comparative poem for a square, which partners with the poem for cubes give in Lesson 9 also. In a learning center, provide Venn diagrams for students to compare/contrast rectangles and rectangular solids and circles and cylinders. (See Associated File) Students can work in pairs or independently to complete the Venn diagrams and then write compare/contrast poems for these other shapes.
NOTE: This lesson has been written for a class who has never completed a Venn diagram. However, if your class is familiar with Venn diagrams then you may find the suggestion below will suite your classroom needs better.
3. Pair groups. Allow groups to complete the Venn diagram together. Then one group will write a poem for the two-dimensional object and the other group will write the poem for the related three-dimensional object using the same poem pattern. The groups will choose which poem pattern they will both use.
4. Set up a Poetry Learning Center students can visit during Guided Reading lessons. Students may use this center time to write poems about geometry, following one of the given patterns or creating a pattern of their own, or use the time to read poems written by others. Poems written by the class and/or classmates should be made into a poetry book or displayed on the walls at this center for students to enjoy.
5. Lessons may reflect modifications of, but are designed in conjunction with the Reading Framework approach to classroom instruction and may be adapted to the Four Block Classroom.
6. This is Lesson 10 – Patterned Poetry; a Writing lesson
Lessons 1 – 3 are for Day 1 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 4 – 7 are for Day 2 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 8 – 11 are for Day 3 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 12 – 15 are for Day 4 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 16 – 19 are for Day 5 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lesson 20 is for Day 6 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lesson 21 is for Day 7 of the unit Geo Jammin’
7. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2959. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
8. The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles). Students should visit the lesson regularly for optimal practice in describing two-dimensional attributes. The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble can be visited by clicking the link in the Weblinks section of this lesson plan or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3161
9. Geo Cleo and the Shape Caper is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of three-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, vertices, edges, faces, angles). Students should visit the lesson regularly for optimal practice in describing three-dimensional attributes. Geo Cleo and the Shape Caper can be visited by clicking the link in the Weblinks section of this lesson plan or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3160
10. Enjoy additional Math poems in the book, [Marvelous Math-A Book of Poems]. (Hopkins, Lee Bennett. [Marvelous Math-A Book of Poems]. New York: Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers, 1997.)
11. Check the Geo Jammin’ Glossary for word definitions. The glossary is located in the Associated File of Lesson 2, Math Mouth.
12. Ask the ESE teacher for further modifications with regards to students needing extra assistance and/or learning strategies.

Web Links

This is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles).
The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble

This is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of three-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, vertices, edges, faces, angles).
Geo Cleo and the Shape Caper

Attached Files

Activity Sheets and Literacy Link parent page     File Extension: pdf

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.