Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Geo Jammin' - Day 3, Lesson 11: Poly Doodles All Day

Katie Koehnemann
Bay District Schools

Description

Students explore geometric vocabulary through creation of shapes on a geoboard. Oral presentation of design attributes, transfer of design, and color-coding components mix to create a fun and exciting lesson that stretches student thinking.

Objectives

The student writes for familiar occasions, audiences and purposes (including but not limited to entertaining, informing, responding to literature).

The student uses volume, phrasing, and intonation appropriate for different situations (for example, large or small group settings, sharing oral stories, dramatic activities).

The student speaks for different purposes (for example, informing, entertaining, expressing ideas).

The student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles).

The student describes attributes of three-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, vertices, edges, faces, angles).

The student sorts two- and three-dimensional figures according to their attributes.

The student knows the names of two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures presented in various orientations in the environment.

Materials

-Geoboard with appropriate rubber bands for each student
-Colored pencils for each child (green, blue, orange, yellow, red)
-Overhead projector with viewing surface
-Colored pens for overhead
-Math Mouth word board
-Student Math Moments journals
-The words polygon and polyhedron each written on sentence strip, with the “poly” portion of each written in a different color or underlined
-Geoboard made for use with an overhead projector
-Poly Doodles introduction transparency (See Associated File)
-Poly Doodles All Day student worksheets for each student (See Associated File)
-Poly Doodles All Day student worksheets made as color transparencies
-Copy of Doodle Clues (See Associated File)
-Sharpened pencils for students
-Literacy Link parent pages (See Associated File)
-An Assessment Management Tool for each student (See Associated Files in the Unit Plan)

Preparations

1. Check that the overhead projector is working.
2. Gather a geoboard for overhead projectors (with rubber bands).
3. Write the words polygon and polyhedron on sentence strip.
4. Gather geoboards and sufficient rubber bands for each child.
5. Gather three-dimensional math manipulatives for each child (cube, pyramid, rectangular solid).
6. Make sets of colored pencils (green, blue, orange, yellow, red).
7. Make transparencies of Poly Doodles introduction and Poly Doodles All Day student worksheets. (See Associated File)
8. Print student copies of Poly Doodles All Day student worksheets. (See Associated File)
9. Print copy of Poly Doodles All Day Answer Key. (See Associated File)
10. Print a copy of Doodle Clues. (See Associated File)
11. Gather student Math Moments journals.
12. Print copies of Literacy Link parent pages. (See Associated File)
13. Use the Assessment Management Tool to record student formative assessment results. (See Associated Files in the Unit Plan)
14. Associated File contains:
Poly Doodles All Day Answer Key
Poly Doodles All Day student worksheets
Poly Doodles introduction page
Doodle Clues
Literacy Link parent pages

Procedures

NOTE: This lesson is designed to stretch student thinking. The terms polygon and polyhedron are not summatively assessed, however, working with these terms provides higher-order thinking on vocabulary and leads to understanding of further items.

NOTE: Students attempt three-dimensional shapes on geoboards. This is not an easy task. To expedite the lesson, be prepared to demonstrate how to create each (cube, pyramid, rectangular solid). TIP: Provide each student a set of math manipulatives representing these shapes.

1. Hold up a geoboard, and ask students if they know what it is. Write the word geoboard on the chalkboard. Ask if they recognize any parts of the word. Students should identify “geo,” and associate it with beginning of the word “geometry.” Some may recognize “board.” Guide student thinking: if there is part of the word geometry, that gives a clue that this could be thought of as a geometry board.

2. Set parameters for using geoboards. Proper behavior includes how to lift rubber bands off the pegs so they do not shoot across the room, no deliberate use as flying objects, and how to store when not in use. Model expectations and first-time how-to by demonstrating with the overhead geoboard.

3. Hand out geoboard and rubber bands to students. Allow time for free exploration with the geoboard before beginning the structured part of the lesson. Students “play” to create shapes, designs, and to discover what they can do. Encourage discussion with neighbors about what they create. Move around the room observing and conferencing with students about their creations. Watch to learn what they can do and what causes them difficulty and assist as necessary.

4. Tell students free exploration is over. Place introduction Poly Doodles transparency on the overhead. (See Associated File) Explain that, like Poly, they will be doodling on the geoboards all day and will learn about two types of “Polys.” Students listen carefully as directions are read. They use rubber bands on their geoboard to create the described shape. Then hold up the geoboard so Geo George can see it.

5. Explain that work will be completed on Poly Doodles All Day student worksheet at the same time. Hand out Poly Doodles All Day worksheet with numbers 1 – 3.

6. Geo George reads Doodle Clue #1 aloud. (See Associated File) Students listen as the clue is read and create the shape on their geoboards. Students hold up their geoboards for individual formative assessment. Watch for correct and accurate shapes. Reread the clue if necessary.

7. When most have correctly displayed their work, Geo George calls on a student to demonstrate the correct shape on the overhead geoboard. Students self-adjust and correct their shapes if necessary.

8. Turn off the overhead projector.

9. Instruct students to look at Number 1 on Poly Doodles All Day worksheet. Direct students to use a pencil to transfer the shape from the geoboard to the geo-dot paper next to Number 1. Call a student to model on the overhead transparency of Poly Doodles All Day.

10. Direct students to the questions in the box next to their transfer shape. Call on a student to read, “What is my name?” Call on another student for the answer, “square.” Model on the overhead where to write the answer. Students do the same on their paper. Call on students to tell “Why?”, model recording the answer, and guide students to do the same. Formatively assess student responses to the questions, listening for concise and accurate mathematical language in a clear, audible voice.

11. Follow procedure for the question, “What am I?” Students predict correct response. Introduce the word polygon on sentence strip. Add it to Math Mouth word board. Make sight connections from Poly on the worksheet to the “poly” portion of the word polygon. Tell students “poly” means many or several. Answer question, “What am I?” with “polygon.” Model and record on worksheet. Students respond on their sheet.

12. Teach the answer to the next question, “Why?” (See Associated File for Poly Doodles All Day Answer Key) Model writing response on overhead, while students do the same on their sheet. Continue to guide students through each question in the first box. Call on students to answer each question, and listen for concise answers which indicate a clear understanding. Give positive and corrective feedback as needed. Oral responses should drive your instruction. Continue to model and have students record answers by writing on the worksheet.

13. Direct students to the color code in the directions at the top of the page. Call on various students to explain, identifying the different components of the square. Allow students time to complete the coloring of the attributes of the square. Have another student come to the overhead to model color-coding the components with colored markers. Ask questions so as they work, they explain what they are doing and why. As students watch and listen, they are to ask questions, offer peer feedback, and self-assess their own work, making adjustments as needed on their paper.

14. Follow the same procedure for the next two polygons. Watch for proficiency level to rise and change procedures accordingly. For example, on the third shape, students complete all questions and color-coding individually before correct answers are displayed on the overhead.

15. Hand out to students the second page of Poly Doodles All Day (numbers 4-6). Use same procedures as with the first page, with the exception being this page introduces the word polyhedron. Teach the word polyhedron. Add it to the Math Mouth word board. Continue with procedures.

16. Students staple worksheets together and turn in. At the end of the day, review individual work providing specific feedback on each paper. Place student work in each child’s unit folder.

17. Allow students to reflect with time to freely write in their Math Moments journals. Guide students to write about things learned today, what they liked best, what they are confused about, what they didn’t like, etc.

18. At the end of the day, hand out Literacy Link pages to take home to parents.

Assessments

Student understanding of mathematical language and the ability to identify and sort figures according to their attributes is formatively assessed as students create shapes on the geoboard. Students’ ability to describe two- and three-dimensional shapes by attribute is formatively assessed as students give oral responses to questions and demonstration of their work as they participate in reciprocal teaching opportunities, and through written responses on the Poly Doodles All Day worksheets. As students give oral responses and participate in reciprocal teaching, formatively assess for good speaking qualities of clear, audible, intonation (rhythm or speed), and phrasing.

Extensions

1. Literacy Link – Before leaving for the day, scan with students the classroom display of shapes. Is there any missing? Are there some we have miss categorized? Do we have a sample for each of the two-dimensional and three-dimensional shapes we have been learning about this week? Challenge students to find at home and bring to school three-dimensional shapes that may be scant or missing all together from the display.
2. Have geoboard activities as center work. Include activities such as, “Copy these shapes on the geoboard”, and “Count the sides and angles” to help them realize the number of sides and angles is the same in any polygon. Extend vocabulary with words like triangle, quadrilateral, pentagon, hexagon, and octagon which correspond to the number of sides and angles.
3. Lessons may reflect modifications of, but are designed in conjunction with the Reading Framework approach to classroom instruction and may be adapted to the Four Block Classroom.
4. This is Lesson 11 – Poly Doodles All Day; a Math lesson
Lessons 1 – 3 are for Day 1 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 4 – 7 are for Day 2 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 8 – 11 are for Day 3 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 12 – 15 are for Day 4 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 16 – 19 are for Day 5 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lesson 20 is for Day 6 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lesson 21 is for Day 7 of the unit Geo Jammin’
5. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2959. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
6. The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles). Students should visit the lesson regularly for optimal practice in describing two-dimensional attributes. The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble can be visited by clicking the link in the Weblinks section of this lesson plan or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3161
7. Geo Cleo and the Shape Caper is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of three-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, vertices, edges, faces, angles). Students should visit the lesson regularly for optimal practice in describing three-dimensional attributes. Geo Cleo and the Shape Caper can be visited by clicking the link in the Weblinks section of this lesson plan or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3160
8. Check the Geo Jammin’ Glossary for word definitions. The glossary is located in the Associated File of Lesson 2, Math Mouth.
9. Ask the ESE teacher for further modifications with regards to students needing extra assistance and/or learning strategies.

Web Links

This is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles).
The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble

This is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of three-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, vertices, edges, faces, angles).
Geo Cleo and the Shape Caper

Attached Files

Student Activity, Answer Key     File Extension: pdf

Literacy Link     File Extension: pdf

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