Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Geo Jammin' - Day 4, Lesson 13: Where, Oh Where, Can the Geo Be?

Katie Koehnemann
Bay District Schools

Description

Listening for geometric shapes occurring in the natural environment as presented in a student-generated story, students identify each natural object and correctly label it as the geometric shape that it is according to its attributes.

Objectives

The student uses knowledge and experience to tell about experiences or to write for familiar occasions, audiences, and purposes.

The student uses volume, phrasing, and intonation appropriate for different situations (for example, large or small group settings, sharing oral stories, dramatic activities).

The student speaks for different purposes (for example, informing, entertaining, expressing ideas).

The student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles).

The student describes attributes of three-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, vertices, edges, faces, angles).

The student knows the names of two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures presented in various orientations in the environment.

Materials

-Copy of My Crazy Dream (See WebLinks section)
-Chart paper
-Different colored makers
-Story spot for students to gather in
-An Assessment Management Tool for each student (See Associated Files in the Unit Plan)

Preparations

1. Print copy of My Crazy Dream. (See WebLinks section)
2. Read story prior to sharing with class. Make a list of objects students could identify.
3. Hang blank chart paper in story area.
4. Gather colored markers. (Two alternating colors)
5. Prepare classroom story area.
6. Use the Assessment Management Tool to record student formative assessment results. (See Associated Files in the Unit Plan)

Procedures

1. Geo George invites students to gather on the floor in the story spot. Puppet explains geometry occurs everywhere in our natural world. Everything has shape. Point to the chart paper. Ask, “What shape is this?” Formatively assess student response. (Two-dimensional rectangle) Have them explain why, listening for a correct and accurate description, such as, “It is flat and can only be measured in two directions.”

2. Puppet explains you have a story to read. Geo George asks them to listen for geometric shapes occurring naturally in the story.

3. Instruct students to listen carefully as the story is read. Read the story, My Crazy Dream. *When reading the list of six polyhedron shapes, act surprised and express wonderment as to what they might be. (In the next lesson we will visit a site that shows us what each of those is.)
*When coming to the part of the story that lists three-dimensional attributes, ask the class to tell what each is, before reading aloud what is written in the story. Formatively assess student responses for accuracy. Guide students to check their definition against that in the story.

4. After the story, Geo George asks if anyone heard objects named in the story that are geometric shapes. Call on individual students to share. Then ask them to name the three-dimensional geometric shape that it is.
*For example, carpet (square or rectangle), bed (rectangular solid), a door (rectangular solid), house (cube-shaped), whiteboard (square or rectangle), etc. Formative assessment occurs as the puppet listens for correct and accurate recognition of shapes of natural objects.

5. Instruct students to listen as the story is read again. This time, as they hear a natural object that has an identifiable shape, raise their hand immediately. See how many geometric shapes can be found.

6. Call on various students as the story is read again. Formatively assess individual student responses as students name natural objects and give it a three-dimensional geometric name. Ask the class who agrees, has anything to add, or disagrees. Formatively assess peer responses, listening for accuracy and correctness. Make a list of identified natural objects and their corresponding geometric name on chart paper. Continue formative assessment throughout the shared reading session. Remember to formatively assess students’ speaking voices.

7. Praise for a job well done. Express curiosity about all those other odd named geometric shapes. George suggests all follow him to the next lesson and he can show us.

Assessments

Formative assessment of student understanding of sorting according to attribute, defining two- and three-dimensional objects as they occur in the natural environment, and use of correct mathematical language, occurs as students identify, categorize, and correctly explain their reasons for items they select from the story. As students give oral responses and participate in reciprocal teaching, formatively assess for good speaking qualities (clear, audible, intonation (rhythm or speed), and phrasing).

Extensions

1. To integrate Science, visit a crystals site and look at pyrite and halite. Try looking at salt under the Intel computer microscope. Quartz sand can be used to compare the shapes with the salt. Students can see that 3-D shapes are even in the microscopic environment. A honeycomb would be neat to investigate, too.
2. Lessons may reflect modifications of, but are designed in conjunction with the Reading Framework approach to classroom instruction and may be adapted to the Four Block Classroom.
3. This is Lesson 13 – Where, Oh Where, Can the Geo Be?; a Shared Reading lesson
Lessons 1 – 3 are for Day 1 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 4 – 7 are for Day 2 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 8 – 11 are for Day 3 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 12 – 15 are for Day 4 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 16 – 19 are for Day 5 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lesson 20 is for Day 6 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lesson 21 is for Day 7 of the unit Geo Jammin’
4. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2959. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
5. The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles). Students should visit the lesson regularly for optimal practice in describing two-dimensional attributes. The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble can be visited by clicking the link in the Weblinks section of this lesson plan or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3161
6. Geo Cleo and the Shape Caper is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of three-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, vertices, edges, faces, angles). Students should visit the lesson regularly for optimal practice in describing three-dimensional attributes. Geo Cleo and the Shape Caper can be visited by clicking the link in the Weblinks section of this lesson plan or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3160
7. Check the Geo Jammin’ Glossary for word definitions. The glossary is located in the Associated File of Lesson 2, Math Mouth.
8. Ask the ESE teacher for further modifications with regards to students needing extra assistance and/or learning strategies.

Web Links

Web supplement for Day 4, Lesson 13–Where, Oh Where, Can the Geo Be?
Math Forum: Alejandre: Student 1- Polyhedra Essay

This is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles).
The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble

This is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of three-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, vertices, edges, faces, angles).
Geo Cleo and the Shape Caper

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.