Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Geo Jammin' - Day 4, Lesson 15: Geo Jingo Jivin'

Katie Koehnemann
Bay District Schools

Description

In this writing lesson, students investigate musical instruments of varying geometric shapes that correspond with the three-dimensional shapes studied, and write shape pattern tunes, which will be read and played by students on the geometric instruments.

Objectives

The student writes for familiar occasions, audiences and purposes (including but not limited to entertaining, informing, responding to literature).

The student uses volume, phrasing, and intonation appropriate for different situations (for example, large or small group settings, sharing oral stories, dramatic activities).

The student speaks for different purposes (for example, informing, entertaining, expressing ideas).

The student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles).

The student describes attributes of three-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, vertices, edges, faces, angles).

The student sorts two- and three-dimensional figures according to their attributes.

The student knows the names of two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures presented in various orientations in the environment.

Materials

-Cooperative and supportive music teacher
-Musical instruments that are identifiable by their geometric shape (For example: a triangle, a hollow block, a wooden cylinder shaped instrument that has a corduroy side you rub a stick on, drum, sticks, etc. The music teacher should be able to hook you up with a variety of instruments that are examples of geometric shapes.)
-Box to store instruments
-Chart that shows pictorial examples, or symbols, for each of the instruments
-Shape tune written on transparency using pictures or symbols
-Blank transparency films
-Vis-ŕ-vis overhead pens
-Overhead projector with projection surface
-Space to line up and play instruments (orchestra pit)
-Shape names filled in on Capturing “Lions” of Poetry Literacy Link parent page(See Associated File)
-An Assessment Management Tool for each student (See Associated Files in the Unit Plan)

Preparations

1. Incorporate the help of the music teacher several days in advance.
2. Gather geometrically-identifiable musical instruments.
3. Prepare an orchestra pit.
4. Set up the overhead projector with projection surface.
5. Make a chart showing pictures and symbols of each instrument.
6. Gather transparency film and Vis-ŕ-vis overhead pens for each group.
7. Prepare a sample musical pattern written on transparency.
8. Write the name of a two- or three- dimensional shape in the space on each Capturing “Lions” of Poetry Literacy Link parent page. (See Associated File) Some students will have the same shape.
9. Use the Assessment Management Tool to record student formative assessment results. (See Associated Files in the Unit Plan)
10. Associated File contains:
Capturing “Lions” of Poetry Literacy Link parent page

Procedures

1. Open the box of instruments and take one out. Ask students to identify the instrument by its geometric shape. Ask if it is two- or three-dimensional and why. Listen for correct answers, formatively assessing student knowledge of attributes and application to objects within the environment.
*For example: Hold up the block. Student response would be, “Rectangular solid. It is three-dimensional because you can measure its depth, width, and height. It takes space and has faces, edges, and vertices.”

2. As each instrument is unboxed, call on different students to name, give spatial identity to, and describe attributes for each. Line instruments up in the playing area, or orchestra pit.

3. Call individual students, one for each instrument, to come to the orchestra pit. Once the students are assembled and have an instrument to play, ask each to play their instrument so that everyone can hear the sound it makes. Next, ask the students with instruments to all play together. Halt the noise!

4. Direct student attention to the pictorial chart. Through questioning, students realize the pictorial symbols are two-dimensional representations of the three-dimensional instruments. The pictures of the instruments are two-dimensional because they are flat, do not take space, and have sides and one surface.

5. Explain that the symbols can be written in a pattern to create a musical tune.
*NOTE: Get assistance from the music teacher in helping plan and arrange a musical tune that is catchy and rhythmic.

6. Lay the musical tune pattern on the overhead. Explain that not all play at once, but they read the order of the pattern and play their instrument following the two-dimensional representations. Ah one, and ah two. . .

7. Guide students with the first attempt. Help keep tempo by directing so it sounds like a tune, not disjointed noise. Guide students as to when it is their turn to play. Enjoy the attempts.

8. Call another group of students to come and play the tune. Continue until all students have had a chance to play the instruments.

9. Ask students to make groups of 4–5. Hand out to each group a sheet of transparency film and a Vis-ŕ-vis overhead pen. Instruct student groups to create a short tune. Tell them to add a repeat sign so musicians will keep the tune going, playing it through more than once.

10. Allow each group to play the tune they create.

11. Tell students about the Capturing “Lions” of Poetry Literacy Link parent page. Explain they are to brainstorm attributes of the named shape and write a poem about it. They may use one of the poem patterns used in class (see Lesson 9, Attribute Attitude), or write a poem using rhyme. (A sample is included on the Capturing “Lions” of Poetry Literacy Link parent page.) It may be short or long. It can be a family project. They may get help from parents, siblings, etc.

12. Send home the Capturing “Lions” of Poetry Literacy Link parent page with students at the end of the day.

Assessments

Formative assessment of student ability to sort, name and describe two- and three-dimensional shapes according to their attributes as presented in various orientations in the environment, occurs as students identify each musical instrument with regards to their geometric and spatial identity, two-dimensional symbols are identified and matched with the three-dimensional counterpart, and as students read rhythmic patterns (two-dimensional) and convert it to playing those patterns with instruments (three-dimensional) . Positive and corrective feedback should be given as each instrument is presented, symbols are identified, and tunes are played.

Extensions

1. If you are unable to provide the necessary amount of space for this musical activity within your own classroom, arrange with the music teacher for a collaborative approach for presenting this lesson. One option is to do this lesson in the music room during the regularly scheduled music time or during another available time.
2. Lessons may reflect modifications of, but are designed in conjunction with the Reading Framework approach to classroom instruction and may be adapted to the Four Block Classroom.
3. This is Lesson 15 – Geo Jingo Jivin’; a Writing lesson
Lessons 1 – 3 are for Day 1 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 4 – 7 are for Day 2 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 8 – 11 are for Day 3 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 12 – 15 are for Day 4 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lessons 16 – 19 are for Day 5 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lesson 20 is for Day 6 of the unit Geo Jammin’
Lesson 21 is for Day 7 of the unit Geo Jammin’
4. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2959. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).
5. The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles). Students should visit the lesson regularly for optimal practice in describing two-dimensional attributes. The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble can be visited by clicking the link in the Weblinks section of this lesson plan or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3161
6. Geo Cleo and the Shape Caper is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of three-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, vertices, edges, faces, angles). Students should visit the lesson regularly for optimal practice in describing three-dimensional attributes. Geo Cleo and the Shape Caper can be visited by clicking the link in the Weblinks section of this lesson plan or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=3160
7. Check the Geo Jammin’ Glossary for word definitions. The glossary is located in the Associated File of Lesson 2, Math Mouth.
8. Ask the ESE teacher for further modifications with regards to students needing extra assistance and/or learning strategies.

Web Links

This is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of two-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, edges, vertices, angles).
The Facts Please, Mr. Mumble

This is an interactive Student Web Lesson that addresses the standard: the student describes attributes of three-dimensional shapes using mathematical language (for example, curves, vertices, edges, faces, angles).
Geo Cleo and the Shape Caper

Attached Files

Literacy Link homework assignment     File Extension: pdf

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