Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Rock Around the Clock

Christine Davis
Bay District Schools

Description

Students will learn to tell time by ringing a bell on the hours and half-hours.

Objectives

The student demonstrates an understanding of time using digital and analog clocks (for example, hour and half-hour intervals).

Materials

- A large Judy Clock
- A small bell that students can ring
- An analog clock that is where the students can see it
- A digital clock that is where the students can see it
- A copy of “Rock Around the Clock” worksheet (See associated file)

Preparations

1. Read over the lesson plans and become familiar with the lesson.
2. Get the necessary supplies.
3. Download “Rock Around the Clock” worksheet and make a copy for each student.

Procedures

1. Ask students how people tell the time. Ask students if they know what kinds of clocks there are. While holding the Judy Clock, ask students if they know which hand is the hour hand and which hand is the minute hand. Be sure to allow several students to respond to each question. This will help serve as a diagnostic test for the class.

2. Explain to the class that there are two types of clocks, an analog clock and a digital clock. Point to each clock as you name them. Ask the class which type of clock is the easiest to use and why they think that it is easier to use. Give praise (Good, a digital clock is easier to read because the numbers tell you exactly what time it is) or corrective feedback (The analog clock is a little harder to use because you have to figure out where the hands are pointing to in order to tell what time it is) as needed. Tell the class that for the next week or two they are going to be studying time.

3. While showing the class the Judy Clock, point to the minute hand. Explain to the class that the “long” hand is the minute hand. It is used to tell the minutes. Explain that when telling time to the hour, the minute hand points straight up, or to the twelve.

4. While showing the class the Judy Clock, point to the hour hand. Explain to the class that the “short” hand is the hour hand. It is used to tell the hours. Explain that when telling time to the hour, the hour hand points to whatever hour it is. If it is three o’clock, the hour hand will point to the three. If it is ten o’clock it will point to the ten.

5. Show the class two o’clock on the Judy Clock. Ask the students if they know what time is on the clock. Give praise (good, it is 2:00. You remembered that when telling time to the hour, that the minute hand points to the 12 and the hour hand points to the number.) or corrective feedback (Nice try, but remember that when telling time to the hour that the minute hand or long hand points to the 12 and that the short hand or hour hand points to the hour that it is.) as needed.

6. Repeat step 5 several more times until there are some students that feel comfortable telling time to the hour. Chances are there are several students who can tell time already.

7. Show the class the Judy Clock again. This time explain to the class that when telling time to the half-hour, that the minute hand or long hand points to the 6. Count the number of minutes from the 12 to the 6. This will show the class that there are 30 minutes between the 12 and the 6.

8. While showing the class the Judy Clock, explain to them that when telling time to the half hour, the hour hand or short hand points halfway between the hour that is named and the next hour. For example, when it is 10:30, the hour hand points halfway between the 10 and the 11.

9. Show the class 5:30 on the Judy Clock. Ask the students if they know what time is on the clock. Give positive praise (Good, it is 5:30. You remembered that when telling time to the half hour, that the big hand or minute hand points to the 6 and that the short hand or hour hand points halfway between the 5 and 6) or corrective feedback (Thank you for trying, but remember that when telling time to the half hour that the long hand or minute hand points to the 6 and the short hand or hour hand points halfway between the hour named and the next number. In this case, the 5 and the 6) as needed.

10. Repeat step 9 for several more half- hour times until there are some students who can tell time to the half- hour.

11. Explain to the class that for the rest of the day and for the next several days that they are going to be clock-watchers. Whenever the clock shows an hour or half hour time, they are going to ring a bell. Show the bell to the class and tell them that when it is their turn to ring the bell, they need to ring it just once. Show them the right way and the wrong way to ring the bell. Explain that if they ring it the wrong way, that they will lose their next turn to ring the bell.

12. Give the bell to a student who appears to know how to tell time. Show the next hour or half-hour on the Judy Clock. Tell the students that you are going to continue to teach, but when the clock gets to the next hour or half-hour the person with the bell will ring it. Tell his neighbors to help him keep on eye on the clock in case he needs to be reminded to ring the bell. Continue with the next lesson of the day.

13. When the bell rings, give praise (Good, it is 2:00. The big hand or minute hand is pointing to the twelve and the short hand or hour hand is pointing to the two) or corrective feedback (No, it is not 2:00 yet. The minute hand or big hand is only pointing to the nine. It will be 2:00 when it gets to the twelve.) as needed. Point to the digital clock and explain to the class that this is how 2:00 looks on a digital clock. You may choose to write this time on the board for the 1st day or two until the students become use to ringing the bell. This will help to eliminate some of the explanation of the digital clock being 2:02 or 1:58.

14. Give the bell to another student and put the next hour or half-hour on the Judy Clock. Tell the class what the next time is that the bell will ring. Continue on with the lesson that is currently being taught.

15. Continue to repeat steps 12 – 14 for the rest of the day and for the next several days, until the students are able to tell time to the hour and the half-hour. Depending on how much experience the class has had with telling time, this may be a week long activity or a two week activity.

16. Write 10:30 on the board in a digital clock format. Ask for a student to come up and show that time on the Judy Clock. Give corrective feedback or positive praise as needed.

17. Repeat step 16 for several more times, using different times and remembering to give feedback and praise.

18. Show 5:30 on the Judy Clock. Ask a student to come up and write the time on the board in a digital clock format. Give corrective feedback and positive praise as needed.

19. Repeat step 18 for several more times, remembering to give feedback and praise.

20. Explain to the class that they are going to do a worksheet. Tell them not to be worried. It is just like what they did on the board.

21. Pass out the worksheet and read the directions to the students. Allow the students time to complete the worksheet.

22. After the worksheet is completed and collected, let the students know that they did a great job. Tell them that they can play “Rock Around the Clock” again later on in the year.

Assessments

1. Formatively assess the students during the activities and during the days that the students are ringing the bell. Provide positive praise and corrective feedback as needed.
2. When you feel students are ready, summatively assess by using the worksheet. There are 12 problems on the worksheet. A student needs to get 9 – 12 correct to get an S, 8 correct to get an N, and 0 – 7 correct to get a U.

Extensions

1. Since ringing the bell on the hour and half-hour takes just a small amount of time, this activity is very useful to use as a review. It can be played once a month to maintain the students’ ability to tell time.

Attached Files

A worksheet to assess the students with.     File Extension: pdf

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