Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Is It Real?

Janice Jowers
Okaloosa County Schools

Description

The students learn how to determine whether a text is fact or fiction by completing a whole-group activity with the teacher. They then use this knowledge in a small-group station activity game where they determine if sentences are fact or fiction.

Objectives

The student uses background knowledge and supporting reasons from the text to determine whether a story or text is fact or fiction.

Materials

-Student copies of the Is It Real? Teacher Introduction Lesson (See Associated File)
-4 or 5 Copies of the Is It Real? Game Board (See Associated File)
-4 or 5 File folders
-Laminating machine (optional)
-4 or 5 Copies of the Is It Real? Game Sentences (See Associated File)
-4 or 5 Sheets of different colored construction paper (optional)
-4 or 5 Copies of the Is It Real? Answer Key (See Associated File)
-Small manipulatives for the students to use as game pieces
-4 or 5 Pennies
-Glue and scissors
-Paper

Preparations

1. Download the Is It Real? Teacher Introduction Lesson (See Associated File) and make enough copies for every child.
2. Download the Is It Real? Game Board. (See Associated File)
3. Duplicate four or five copies of the Is It Real? Game Board. Glue the sheets on the inside of the file folders.
4. Laminate the Is It Real? file folders to make them sturdier.
5. Download the Is It Real? Game Sentences. (See Associated File) Duplicate the sentences on construction paper. You could use different colored construction paper.
6. Download the Is It Real? Answer Key. (See Associated File) The Answer Key should be copied onto the back of each Game Sentences sheet. The answers have been lined up with the appropriate sentences.
7. Laminate the construction paper copies of the Is It Real? Game Sentences, with the answers on the back, before you cut them apart so the game will be sturdier.
8. Cut the rectangles of the Is It Real? Game Sentences/Answer Key apart.
9. Place the Is It Real? file folder games in the language arts learning center.

Procedures

1. Pass out the Is It Real? Teacher Introduction Lesson sheet (See Associated File) that has the two sentences on it. Tell the students to draw a picture under each of the sentences showing what the sentence says. Circulate and assist students who might have difficulty reading the sentences. Allow enough time for all the children to illustrate the two sentences.

2. After the students have completed their illustrations, have some of them come to the front of the room and share what they drew.

3. Point out to the students that the first picture about the man in the bird cage could not really happen. Also emphasize that the man in the bedroom could really happen. Tell the children that the man in the bedroom is real or a fact and the man in the bird cage is make-believe or fiction.

4. Have the students think of sentences of their own that are either real/fact, or make-believe/fiction. Let some of the children share their sentences and have the other students say if the sentences are real/fact or make-believe/fiction. If the children cannot think of sentences at first, share some sentences with them to get them started. You could use other ideas about a man, such as a man playing ball, a man flying like a bird, etc.

5. Explain to the students that they are going to play a game in the language station called Is It Real? in which they will decide if the sentences are real/fact or make-believe/fiction.

6. There should be two to four students per game.

7. The students open the Is It Real? file folder game. Inside the folder is a game board that the students will travel along as they read sentences and determine if they are real/fact or make-believe/fiction. If the student answers correctly, he/she flips the penny and moves along the board, one space if the penny lands on heads, and two spaces if it lands on tails.

8. The students read the answers on the back of the sentence cards to check each other for correctness.

9. While the students are completing the Is It Real? activity, the teacher should circulate and offer feedback to them. The teacher could offer assistance such as: “Rachel, reread the sentence. Does that tell you something that could really happen? If it tells you something that could really happen, then the sentence is real or a fact. If you think it tells something that could not happen, then the sentence is fiction or make-believe.” The teacher should note the students who seem to be struggling and provide them with extra assistance.

10. After the students have completed the activity, have them write three sentences on a sheet of paper that tell something that is real/fact because it could really happen. Have the students also write three sentences that tell something that is make-believe/fiction because it could not really happen. The children could use these sentences to play the Is It Real? game in the language activity center. (See Extensions)

11. Once students have completed their activity, collect their papers on which they wrote three real/fact sentences and three make-believe/fiction sentences and assess according to the criteria listed in Assessments (below).

Assessments

1. To evaluate the students’ comprehension of this skill, the teacher can observe their work in the Is It Real? game. This would be a formative assessment. The students should identify whether the sentences are real/fact or make-believe/fiction with 80% accuracy based on 100% total points possible. Students not reaching 80% should be retaught and reassessed.

2. The students' real/fact and make-believe/fiction sentences should be formatively assessed being sure students have written these real and make-believe sentences correctly. Again, students should score 80% accuracy based on 100% total points possible. Those not reaching 80% accuracy should be retaught and reassessed.

Extensions

Have the students make a Is It Real? game of their own. They could cut out blocks of construction paper and write sentences on them. They could use some of the sentences they wrote on their pieces of paper. (See Procedures, step #10) They should write whether these sentences are real/fact or make-believe/fiction on the back of the squares. The other groups of children could use these sentences to play the Is It Real? game.

Modifications:
Students who might have difficulty with this assignment should work with a partner to read the words. This will enhance their level of competency in this skill.
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