Beacon Lesson Plan Library

We Are Having a Party! Part II

Kristy Rousseau
Bay District Schools

Description

This activity is a four-station rotation model for exploring how to collect, display, and analyze data to make predictions and justify decisions in order to solve problems.

Objectives

The student writes notes, comments, and observations that reflect comprehension of content and experiences from a variety of media.

The student solves problems by generating, collecting, organizing, displaying, and analyzing data using histograms, bar graphs, circle graphs, line graphs, pictographs, and charts.

The student determines range, mean, median, and mode from sets of data.

The student uses statistical data about life situations to make predictions and justifies reasoning.

Materials

-Student copies of the We're Having A Party! Graph Template (See Associated File)
-3 Copies per group of the Experimentation Station Graph Template (See Associated File)
-Crayons or colored pencils
-A coin for tossing
-Three dice
-Computers with Internet access
-Student Web Lesson, Arrange a Party (See Weblinks)

Preparations

1. Gather coins and dice for stations one, two, and three.
2. Preview the Student Web Lesson, Arrange a Party. (See Weblinks)
3. Check Internet connectivity for station four.
4. If additional stations are needed, design further experiments for students to conduct, or gather worksheets that reinforce the concept of range.

Procedures

This lesson is part two of an introductory lesson on the concept of data analysis. It is preceded by the lesson, We Are Having A Party! (Part I).

1. Based on the responses given in the formative assessment of the previous lesson, We Are Having A Party! (Part I) review and clarify students' understanding of the range. If needed, take time to address any misconceptions found in their writings.

2. Review the problem-solving steps being used to answer class and personal questions:
Step 1: Understand the Problem
Step 2: Decide on a Plan
Step 3: Carry out the Plan
Step 4: Look Back and Review

3. Explain to the students that they will be working in groups today to further explore the process of data collection and analysis. Introduce the following Experimentation Stations. You may want to place a summary of these station steps on task cards. (Be sure to explain that groups use a blank Experimentation Station Graph Template to create a new graph at each station.)

STATION 1: HEADS OR TAILS?
Question: Which side of the coin occurs most frequently in 20 tosses?
a. As a group, make a prediction and place it on the top of the Experimentation Station Graph Template.
b. Conduct an experiment of 20 tosses, and use tallies or check marks to keep track of the data.
c. Use the Experimentation Station Graph Template to organize and display the data in a bar graph. Remember to label the horizontal and vertical axes.
d. Identify the range of the data. (Help students to see that in this experiment the range simply covers heads and tails. There is not a specified low and high value, because we can not quantify heads and tails.)
e. Use the collected data to predict what you think will occur if you perform this experiment again. Use the Experimentation Station Graph Template to record this information, and be sure to explain why your group made this prediction.

STATION 2: WE’RE ROLLING!
Question: Which number on the die occurs most often in 20 rolls?
a. As a group, make a prediction and place it on the top of the Experimentation Station Graph Template.
b. Conduct an experiment of 20 rolls, and use tallies or check marks to keep track of the data.
c. Use the Experimentation Station Graph Template to organize and display the data in a bar graph. Remember to label the horizontal and vertical axes.
d. Identify the low value of the data. Above this bar, draw an arrow and label it “low value.”
e. Identify the high value of the data. Above this bar, draw an arrow and label it “high value.”
(Monitor groups to make sure students are not just picking the lowest and highest bars.)
f. Connect the ends of these arrows with a line labeled as “range.” Along the line, write the math sentence used to describe the range. (i.e., Range = 6 - 1 = 5)
g. Use the space provided on the Experimentation Station Graph Template to explain any patterns you see.
h. Use the collected data to predict which number on the die you think will occur most often if you perform this experiment again. Use the Experimentation Station Graph Template to record this information, and be sure to explain why your group made this prediction.

STATION 3: WE’RE ROLLING, TOO!
Question: Which sum occurs most often when two dice are rolled 20 times?
a. As a group, make a prediction and place it on the top of the Experimentation Station Graph Template.
b. Conduct an experiment of 20 rolls, and use tallies or check marks to keep track of the data.
c. Use the Experimentation Station Graph Template to organize and display the data in a bar graph. Remember to label the horizontal and vertical axes.
d. Identify the low value of the data. Above this bar, draw an arrow and label it “low value.”
e. Identify the high value of the data. Above this bar, draw an arrow and label it “high value.”
f. Connect the ends of these arrows with a line labeled as “range.” Along the line, write the math sentence used to describe the range. (i.e., Range = 12 - 2 = 10)
g. Use the space provided on the Experimentation Station Graph Template to explain any patterns you see.
h. Use the collected data to predict which sum you think will occur most often if you perform this experiment again. Use the Experimentation Station Graph Template to record this information, and be sure to explain why your group made this prediction.

STATION 4: ARRANGE A PARTY
At this station, students complete the Student Web Lesson, Arrange a Party. (See Weblinks) This lesson focuses on using the range to analyze collected data in order to make predictions and justify decisions.

4. Begin Experimentation Station rotation.

5. After rotations, collect the groups’ graphs and pass out one copy of the We're Having a Party! Graph Template to each student.

6. Ask students to choose one of the sets of data presented in Arrange a Party to display as a bar graph. (These data sets are located on the top of the We're Having a Party! Graph Template.)

7. First, have the students place a check mark beside the question that they will answer and write down their personal predictions. Then, have them organize and display the data using a bar graph. Remind them that the bar graph must contain titles, and they must identify all aspects of the range (low value, high value, area covered, and the math sentence used to describe the range in one number.) Students should follow the same procedures for identifying and labeling the range that they used during the Experimentation Station rotations.

8. On the lines below the graph, students should:
a. write down any patterns they see, and
b. based on the data, explain how they would answer the question.
c. A final explanation should state whether or not they used the range of the data to help them answer the question, and why.

Assessments

1. The students' bar graphs on the We're Having a Party! Graph Template should contain the following information:
a. Appropriate titles for the graph and each axis. Some type of scale should be included for the horizontal axis.
b. Correctly plotted data.
c. Identification of the low and the high values of the data.
d. Identification of the range covered by the data.
e. The mathematical sentence used to describe the range in one number.

2. The students' notes and observations should include:
a. Noticable patterns among the data.
b. Adequate explanations of how they would answer the question based on the data collected.
c. Adequate explanations of whether or not the range was useful in making their prediction.

Extensions

1. Students may conduct each experiment using 30 rolls or tosses if they are completing their station before the students on the computer.
2. After students conduct their experiments, analyze the data, and make predictions, they could conduct one more round of the experiment to test their predictions, gather further data, and readjust their predictions as needed.

Web Links

Students use problem solving steps to find and use the range of a set of data to plan a party.
Arrange a Party

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