Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Mighty Metaphors

Janice Jowers
Okaloosa County Schools

Description

This activity addresses one part of this standard on which the students learn that metaphors are figures of speech that compare two things, but do not use the words -as- and -like.- They then complete a worksheet on which they write metaphors.

Objectives

The student understands similes, metaphors, analogies, and alliteration.

Materials

- White board or chalk board
- Markers for the board
- Drawing paper for the students to use to illustrate their ideas
- Crayons, markers, or colored pencils
- Copy of the Mighty Metaphors Teacher Introduction Lesson (see Associated File)
- Copy of the Mighty Metaphors worksheet (see Associated File)
- A copy of the Mighty Metaphors Answer Key (see Associated File)

Preparations

1. Make sure you have access to a white board or a chalk board.
2. Gather enough drawing paper for each child to have a sheet.
3. Download the Mighty Metaphors Teacher Introduction Lesson (see Associated File) and make copies for each child.
4. Download the Mighty Metaphors worksheet (see Associated File) and make enough copies for each child.
5. Download the Mighty Metaphors worksheet Answer Key (see Associated Files.)

Procedures

1. Display a picture of a car and a dinosaur. Write this sentence on the board - That car is an old dinosaur.- Ask the students what two things are being compared. Discuss what being an old dinosaur would mean.

2. Give the students a piece of paper and have them illustrate what the sentence -That car is an old dinosaur- would look like.

3. Share the drawings the students made emphasizing the comparison between the car and old dinosaur. Emphasize that the car in not really a dinosaur, but it is being compared to that because it is old like a dinosaur.

4. Explain to the children the sentence on the board is a metaphor. Metaphors are figures of speech that compare two things, but do not use the words -like- or -as.-

5. Explain to students that these colorful phrases are used like adverbs or adjectives to describe persons, places, things, or actions. Metaphors should not be taken literally, but writers should enjoy their use.

6. Explain to the students that creative writers make good use of metaphors.

7. Pass out the Mighty Metaphors Teacher Introduction Lesson (see Associated File) and have the students answer the questions about the metaphor phrases and draw illustrations about the metaphors. Two of the metaphors are completely written and the children explain what is being compared and draw illustrations. The other two metaphors are partially written. The students complete them, explain what is being compared and illustrate what they have written.

8. Upon completion have the students share some of the metaphors they have written. Praise them for their creativity and emphasize again that metaphors are figures of speech that compare two things without using -like- and -as.-

9. While the students are completing the Mighty Metaphors Teacher Introduction Lesson activity, the teacher should circulate and offer feedback to them. The teacher could offer assistance such as: Bob, what two things are being compared? How are they alike? Remember, the sentence doesnít mean that Johnís head looks like a real computer. It means that he is very smart like a computer is.

10. The teacher should note the students who seem to be struggling and provide them with extra assistance.

11. Collect these papers after they have been shared.

12. Pass out the Mighty Metaphors worksheet and explain to the students that they are going to write and illustrate some more metaphors.

13. Complete one of the items from the worksheet together with the students to ensure comprehension of the instructions.

14. Explain to the students that when they finish writing the metaphors in each box using the suggested comparisons, they will draw an illustration of what they have written.

15. While the students are completing the Mighty Metaphors worksheet circulate and offer feedback to them. Note which students are struggling and provide them with extra assistance.

16. As a follow-up activity have the students turn their Mighty Metaphors worksheets over and write five metaphors of their own. Have the students illustrate one of these metaphors.

17. Once students have completed their work, collect their papers and assess according to the criteria listed in Assessment.

Assessments

To evaluate the studentsí comprehension of this skill, the teacher can observe their work on the Mighty Metaphors worksheet. This would be a formative assessment. The students should complete the metaphors with 80% accuracy. The evaluation is based on a 100% possible score. Students not reaching 80% should be re-taught and reassessed.
The metaphors the students write on their own should be formatively assessed being sure they have completed the metaphors correctly. Again, students should score 80% accuracy based on a 100% possible score. Those not reaching 80% accuracy should be re-taught and reassessed.

Extensions

Have the students make a Mighty Metaphors worksheet of their own. The children write on a sheet of paper five things they want to compare. The comparisons can be persons, places, things, or actions. They exchange papers with someone in the class or in their group. That person writes metaphors to make the comparisons. They then illustrate one of the metaphors they wrote.
Modifications:
The students who might have difficulty with this assignment should work with a partner to read the words. This will enhance their level of competency in this skill.

Web Links

Web supplement for Mighty Metaphors
Pro Teacher: Metaphor (activities and teacher resources)

Web supplement for Mighty Metaphors
Language Arts Mini-Lessons Elementary K-5 (good for teacher reference)

Web supplement for Mighty Metaphors
Baseball - Baseball Similes (student activities)

Web supplement for Mighty Metaphors
Arctic Theme Unit: Metaphors

Web supplement for Mighty Metaphors
Writing Metaphors (activities)

Web supplement for Mighty Metaphors
RHL School: Metaphor (activity)

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.