Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Name the Constellation

Lee Strain
Polk County Schools

Description

Students' names twinkle in the night sky when they create narratives for their own constellations.

Objectives

The student attempts to establish a single story focus on a topic through the use of suspense, humor, creativity or fantasy.

Materials

-Bubble sheet for each student
-Piece of white copy paper for each student
-Writing paper for each student
-Pencils
-Crayons
-Chart paper
-Marker
-Computer with Internet access
-Printer or projection system for sharing online stories (See Preparations)

Preparations

1. Gather materials.
2. Review stories of constellations from Websites. (See Weblinks)
3. Print out the stories to share with students, or prepare to show sites from the computer to the students.
4. Grid your name on a bubble sheet. Place a white piece of paper over the bubble sheet and copy the colored bubbles onto the white sheet of paper to make a pattern. Use the “constellation” that emerges from your name to create a story to share with the students.

Procedures

1. Share Greek, Roman and Native American stories about constellations from the Websites. (See Weblinks)

2. Discuss the creativity that went into these stories. The Greeks, Romans, and Native Americans made up stories using familiar objects to explain natural happenings. Have children pick out examples of the creativity.

3. Using your name and the drawing from your bubble sheet, model a story for the students.

4. Have each student bubble in his/her name on a bubble sheet.

5. Then have the students place the plain, white copy paper over the bubble sheet and copy the colored in bubbles onto the white sheet of paper to make a pattern.

6. Have the students study the bubble marks and create an animal or object by connecting the bubble marks.

7. Students create a narrative of how the animal or object became a constellation. Remind them to be as creative as possible.

8. With the assistance of the teacher, the students revise, edit and publish their stories.

Assessments

Use the student's final copy to determine if the student was able to create an imaginative, focused story explaining how the constellation ended up in the night sky. If a child was not successful, assist the child with a story line.

Note: This is a formative assessment and does not assess fantasy, suspense or humor, although students may incorporate them into their stories.

Extensions

Bind the published stories in a class book. This book can be shared with the school by placing it in the library.

Web Links

Web supplement for Name the Constellation
Legends

Web supplement for Name the Constellation
Myths

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