Beacon Lesson Plan Library

How Do I Measure Up? (Early Grades)

Cathy Burgess
Bay District Schools

Description

In this lesson, students find out more about their bodies and what makes them different by tracing each their partners' bodies on butcher paper. They record their heights and weights, then compare them to the others in the class.

Objectives

The student knows how to use positive communication skills when expressing needs, wants, and feelings.

The student uses prior knowledge, illustrations, and text to make predictions.

The student uses beginning letters (onsets) and patterns (rhymes) as visual cues for decoding.

The student uses one-to one correspondence to count objects to 100 or more.

The student demonstrates an understanding of measurement of lengths by selecting appropriate units of measurement (for example, inches or feet).

The student demonstrates an understanding of weight by selecting appropriate units of measurement (for example, grams or kilograms).

The student records data using concrete materials or pictures.

The student organizes information into a simple pictograph or concrete graph.

The student uses mathematical language to read and interpret data on a simple concrete graph, pictorial graph, or chart.

Materials

-Bear stickers (one package to pass out as needed)
-Suggested book, [Tiger Math Learning to Graph from a Baby Tiger]. Nagda, Henry Holt and Company. 2000
-Suggested book, [Measuring]. Cato. Carolrhoda Books, Inc. 1999
-Suggested book, [Measuring Penny]. Leedy, Henry Holt and Company, Inc. 1997
-Suggested book, [Whoever You Are]. Mem Fox. Voyager Books, 1997
-Suggested book, [The Big Toe] June Melser and Joy Cowley. The Wright Group. 1990
-Suggested book, [How Big is a Foot?]. Rolf Myller. Dell Young Yearling. 1990
-Suggested book, [Measurement Mysteries]. Marcia Gresko. Creative Teaching Press, Inc. 1992
-Poem, "Everybody Has A Name" (from lesson two)
-Poem, "I’m Glad I’m Me" (from lesson three)
-Poem, "This Is Me" (download; see Weblinks)
-Chart paper
-Highlight tape
-Magnetic letters and board
-White butcher paper or bulletin board paper (long sheets for tracing body of each student)
-Paper to trace toes
-Ruler
-Yardstick
-Tape measure
-Bathroom scales for measuring body weight
-Food scales for measuring small things
-Small objects to measure like a ring, book, eraser, stapler, paper clip, cup, piece of paper etc…
-Pictures of small objects and large objects to measure (elephant, dinosaur, building, lighthouse, chair, refrigerator, bookcase, etc.)
-2 Separate yards of rope for a circle diagram

Preparations

1. Download poem (see Weblinks).
2. Write the poem, "This Is Me" on chart paper.
3. Make sure the other poems, "I’m Glad I’m Me" and "Everybody Has A Name" are assessible.
4. Gather [The Big Toe, Whoever You Are, Measuring Penny, Measuring], and [Tiger Math], and have them ready to read.
5. Magnetic letters and boards and highlight tape are needed.
6. Gather ruler, yardstick, tape measure, small scale, larger scale for weighing bodies.
7. Obtain a sheet of white butcher paper or bulletin board paper cut for each student.
8. Small objects are needed for measurement: a ring, book, eraser, stapler, paper clip, cup, and a piece of paper.
9. Pictures of small and large objects for classifying are needed. (elephant, dinosaur, building, lighthouse, chair, refrigerator, bookcase, etc.)
10. Obtain bear stickers
11. Make the Big Toe graph on chart paper.

Procedures

Lesson 4, Day 5 of the All About Me unit. It is a good idea to have a volunteer or paraprofessional help you take students' measurements, so the lesson moves quickly.

Calendar: It is a good idea to start each day with calendar activities. This builds skills on dates, months, yesterday, today, tomorrow, even and odd, graphing, counting by ones, twos, and fives. See Weblinks on how to incorporate this into your daily routine.

1. Call students to circle time. Check on how classroom manners are going. (If you are using the ‘Beary’ Good Manners backpack, read one of the journal entries and discuss it.) Ask: Who has seen someone using good classroom manners? Talk about specific examples you have seen or those that the kids tell you about. Give the students who have shown expert class manners a bear sticker for 'beary' good manners. Review and read the poems "Everybody Has A Name" and "I’m Glad I’m Me." Call on a couple of students to tell you why they are glad to be them. Tell them how much you are enjoying learning about them!

a. With the highlight tape, highlight the words long and wrong from "Everybody Has A Name." Ask: What is special about these two words from the poem? Yes, they rhyme.

b. With magnetic letters take off the onset of both words, so the students can see ‘ong’. Tell them ‘ong’ is the word family.

c. Create new words with the magnetic letters b, d, g, h, k, s, and t. Read those words aloud together, so students can hear the rhyming sound.

d. Tell students as they learn to read, this is a strategy they can use to figure out unknown words. If you can recognize and read 'long', then you can read seven other words.

e. Let’s write song in a sentence. I sing a song. Underline the vocabulary word we used to write the sentence. Have someone read it back to you. Have them tell you how they could figure out a word like song if they did not know how to read it.

2. Yesterday we used mirrors to look at ourselves. Tell students today we are going to find out more about how our bodies are alike and different. Ask how could we do that? (Accept all reasonable answers) Show students the scales and see if that changes some of their answers. Then show them the ruler, yardstick, and tape measure. With those clues, students should say they are going measure how tall they are and how much they weigh. But first we must figure out which tool we need to use.

3. First show the ruler, tape measure, and yardstick. Tell students we use these tools to measure lengths like how long or short something is. A ruler is used to measure small or little items because it has inches. Inches are small amounts. Show inches on the ruler. Hold up several examples you would use a ruler to measure like: a finger, a ring, and a book. Actually show students how to measure those items and state how many inches.

4. Next show the yardstick and tape measure. Tell students these tools are used to measure how long or tall bigger things are because they use the measurement of a foot or feet. Like the rocking chair the teacher is sitting in, the chalkboard, the carpet we are sitting on, etc… Use the yardstick to measure them. Show that a ruler is too small and would take too long. It is not an appropriate tool.

5. Now ask: What tool do we use to measure small things? (a ruler) What tool do we use to measure large things? (a yardstick or tape measure)

6. Tell students: I am going to hold up an object or picture and you will classify it into the ruler or yardstick category for measuring. Show a paper clip, stapler, cup, piece of paper, and pictures of large objects.

7. Tell students: Measuring helps you understand the world by answering questions like: how tall, how heavy, and how small. Read and discuss the book, [Measuring Penny]. (This book introduces students to all kinds of measurement, so when you finish reading it, emphasize what was used to measure length and weight.)

8. Now ask students how we can find out more about bodies. They should say measuring how tall they are and how much they weigh.

A. Do this by paring up students. One student will lie down on the butcher paper and the partner will trace around the body with a pencil. Demonstrate with a student. Show how to go around the fingers and get the whole body. When you are done, count how many body parts you traced aloud. Point to each part to show one-to-one correspondence. Tell them you want them to do that when they are done with this activity.

B. When they are finished tracing their partners, it is their turn to be traced. When both bodies have been traced, the students are to add all the details to their bodies to make them look like them. (For example: hair, face, shirt pants, shoes, etc. Encourage them to take their time and do a good job because they will be displayed in the classroom when they get finished.) Formatively assess students. Criteria is available in assessment section.

9. Tell students, while they are busy tracing and adding details to their bodies, you will come around with a ruler and a yardstick to measure how tall they are. They must first tell which tool would be the most appropriate to use. Get started. Have students record their information on the measurement sheet. (Students will use that information later for a writing activity.)

10. End the lesson by introducing the new poem, "This Is Me!" Read it orally several times tracking the print with your hand. Then ask: What did you learn about measuring? What did you learn about measuring your body? Did you learn something else about others? Tell them tomorrow we will learn more about measuring their bodies.

Lesson 4, Day 6 of the All About Me unit. It is a good idea to have a volunteer or a paraprofessional to help you take students' measurements so the lesson moves quickly. You can always substitute another body part for the toe measurement activity (ex. finger, wrist, nose)

1. Call students to circle time. Ask: What have you learned about yourself? What have you learned about your friends? I have learned so much about you. (State specifics about students like: Yesterday I learned Johnny is 42 inches tall and that Sally got her name from her grandmother.) Also, say: I am seeing some with great manners. State specifics like: Wow! This morning I saw Sara open and hold the door for Lauren because her hands were full. (Give a bear sticker for ‘beary’ good manners that you told about.)

2. Now introduce the big book, [The Big Toe]. Use the cover for students to make predictions and pictures on each page to predict the vocabulary. Then read the story to the students stopping along the way to use picture clues, beginning sounds and what makes sense to figure out unknown words. Read it again, this time all the way through for fluency. Then ask if I were to measure my big toe, what kind of measurement would I use? (a ruler) Why? Go ahead and measure your big toe in front of the kids. Tell them how many inches it is. Say: I wonder if everybody’s big toe will measure the same. We’ll see later in this lesson.

3. Then have students think back to yesterday’s lesson on measurement. Ask: Who remembers what we did? (Measured our bodies) What did we measure our bodies with? (A yardstick) Why? Why don’t we use a ruler? (it is not the best tool) What does a ruler measure? (Small things, like your big toe) Tell some things you would use a ruler to measure. Later when you have time, I want you to measure your big toe. I think that will be very interesting.

4. Today we are going to measure something different. Can you imagine what it is? Show the two different kinds of scales. Talk about how they both measure weight. The food scale measures lightweight objects in ounces. Measure some objects like a paperclip, pencil, eraser, and a thin book and have the students read state their weight in ounces. For example, this paper clip weighs one ounce.

5. Next show the bathroom scales for measuring larger or heavier objects. Weights measured on this scale are measured in pounds. Weigh a book like an encyclopedia, a shoe, a chair, or other larger objects from around the room and state their weight in pounds. Talk about the need to know which kind of scale to use in everyday life and that the larger scale won’t measure the small things like the paper clip and pencil. They won’t register because they don’t weigh enough.

6. Next practice knowing which scale is used for different measurements. On the floor with the rope make two circles. The center of one circle will have the small scale and the center of the other circle should have the scale for measuring large things. Ask students to look around the room and tell you objects that would go into each of the circles and why? Write down the name of what the kids tell you for each circle on a little slip of paper and put that slip of paper in the circle.

7. Wrap up the measuring weight lesson by asking: What do we use to weigh large heavy objects? And what word describes this weight? (Pounds) What do we use to weigh small light objects? What words do we use along with the small scale. (Ounces) Ask students to listen for those words from this part of the book, [Measuring]. Tell them to raise their hands if they hear them. Read and discuss pages 3-9.

8. Now tell students they will continue to work on their body tracings from yesterday, but that they need to finish up today. Make sure students are adding specific details like their hair, eyes, nose etc., so when we look at their pictures we know who they are!

a. Pick one example and say: Let’s count all the body parts (fingers, arms, legs, eyes, ears etc.) this person has drawn. Write the number down on the paper.

b. While students are working on the body tracings, begin to weigh students. Call them up to you one at a time. Ask them to identify the correct scale they would use to weigh themselves. Have them record it on their measurement sheet for later. Formatively assess students.

c. As students leave the weigh station, ask how they are coming along on their body tracings. For those who say they are through or almost through, have them count how many body parts they have drawn on their papers. Have them write the number down on their papers. Formatively assess students and monitor those who seem to be struggling or have mastered the concept.

d. Also, invite them to measure their big toes along with other parts of their bodies like their arms, legs, fingers, wrists, noses, etc. (if there is extra time.) Tell them to record that new information on the back of their measurement sheets. They will use this information later.

e. Pull the students back together and ask them the sizes of their big toes. See how many are the same and different. Talk about that. Then ask them to ask their parents how much they weighed when they were born. Tell them you want them to compare the two later to see how much they’ve grown.

f. Now read the story, [Whoever You Are], by Mem Fox. This book sums up being alike and different so very well and makes the children think deeply about that subject. Say: There are children all over the world that are just like you. Their skin, homes, and schools may be different, but inside they are alike. Ask how. (Their smiles, hurts, joys and pain are the same.) Can they think of other things that might be the same besides what the author suggested?

g. Tell them you are glad they are who they are and that is why you like this poem so much! Reread and recite the "I’m Glad I’m Me" poem if time allows.

Lesson 4, Day 7 of the All About Me unit.

1. Call students to circle time. Ask students to think back to yesterday’s lesson on measurement. What did you use to measure your big toe? Could you weigh your big toe? If so, how? Reread [The Big Toe]. As you read, work on picture clues, vocabulary, and fluency.

2. Distribute measurement papers from yesterday. If there is anyone who did not get to measure their big toes have them do it and record on the back of their papers. Ask: How are we going to find out who has the biggest or smallest big toe? Hopefully someone will bring up graphing; if they don’t, then suggest it.

3. To begin the graphing activity, ask students to trace around their big toes, color and cut them out, and write the measurement on them in inches. Show students what an inch and half-inch is. You may need to individually help some students with this task. (You will want to stick to inches and half inches.) Gather class information by asking: Who has a big toe that measures ½ an inch? Bring the picture of your big toe up and put it on the graph. Who has a big toe that measures 1 inch, 1 ½ inch, and 2 inches? Bring the pictures up one group at a time and place them on the class graph. Formatively assess students.

4. It is time to look at the information and come to a conclusion. Some conclusions you could come up with are: There are the most _____ toes and the least ____ toes. Write the conclusion together as a group. Formatively assess students.

5. Have students count how many toes they just graphed. Then ask: How many big toes do we have altogether in class? Formatively assess students as they count.

6. To end the lesson read parts of [Tiger Math]. It has great graphs that go along with the information. (Since it is a lengthy non-fiction book, I suggest reading pages 7-13 during this lesson and the rest at another read aloud time.) Talk about the graphs and how they add value to the book. Then relate it to the big toe graphing activity. Ask if somebody would like to write a story about the graphing activity we did. Tell them to be looking for that in the writing center.

Assessments

Day 5
A formative assessment takes place when the student demonstrates an understanding of measurement of lengths selecting appropriate units of measurement. Specifically listen for correct oral answers on rulers and yardsticks from #6 in the procedures section and for correct answers on activity #7, 8, 9, and 10.

A formative assessment takes place when the student knows how to use positive communication skills when expressing needs, wants, and feelings during activity #1. Specifically look for oral answers given like: I saw Bobby wait patiently in line for lunch.

A formative assessment in the form of observation takes place when the student uses beginning letters (onsets) and patterns (rhymes) as visual cues for decoding. Specifically look for answers in activity #2 from procedures like: I know the word long and if I take off the beginning letter ‘l’ (onset) and put a ‘s’ in it’s place then the word become song and song makes sense because it starts with an ‘s.'

Day 6
A formative assessment takes place when the teacher observes that the student uses prior knowledge, illustrations, and text to make predictions in procedure #2. Listen for statements like:
a. I see a hand on the cover. It looks like it is picking up another finger or it might be a toe.
b. The old lady takes the toe home.
c. The old lady throws away the toe.
d. I think this story will be about an old lady finding a toe.
A formative assessment takes place when the student demonstrates an understanding of weight by selecting appropriate units of measurement. Specifically listen for correct oral answers from activity #6, 7, and 8.

Observe students using one-to-one correspondence to count objects to 100 or more as they count how many body parts they have drawn in activity #8 in the procedures. (Since this standard is being addressed at the beginning of first grade, one-to-one correspondence to 25 or more is an appropriate assessment.

A formative assessment takes place when the student knows how to use positive communication skills when expressing needs, wants, and feelings during activity #1. Specifically look for oral answers given like: Wow! This morning I saw Sara open and hold the door for Lauren because her hands were full.

Day 7
A formative assessment takes place when the students record the big toe data, organize it into a graph, and interpret the data from the graph in procedure #3 and 4. Specifically look for students actively involved and oral statements like: There are five two inch big toes and ten one and a half inch toes. Toes measure different sizes.

Observe students using one-to-one correspondence to count objects to 100 or more as they count how many body parts they have drawn in activity #5 in the procedures. (Since this standard is being addressed at the beginning of first grade, one-to-one correspondence to 25 or more is an appropriate assessment.

Extensions

1. Math Center: Put the scales, ruler, tape measure, and yardstick in the math center for students to investigate more about measurement.
2. Writing Center: Have students write a story and illustrate it about the big toe graphing activity.
3. Another word family to practice that goes along with this lesson could be
at, an, ag.
4. Center time might be a good time to do the big toe measuring activity. They could work in a group or with a friend. Then do the graphing activity together as a wrap up to the lesson.
5. If you have issues with toe measuring, use a finger, arm, leg, or another body part that won't require removing a stinky shoe.
6. The Beacon Unit Plan associated with this lesson can be viewed by clicking on the link located at the top of this page or by using the following URL: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/search/details.asp?item=2975. Once you select the unit’s link, scroll to the bottom of the unit plan page to find the section, “Associated Files.” This section contains links to the Unit Plan Overview, Diagnostic and Summative Assessments, and other associated files (if any).

Web Links

You can find the poem 'This Is Me' at this Website.
Poem

This site is a search of all public school media centers for specific books and media materials. Use this site to locate the materials needed for this lesson.
Sunlink

Attached Files

The measurement sheet and the big toe graph are located here.     File Extension: pdf

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