Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Capitalization and Washington, D.C.

Joyce Sewell
Bay District Schools

Description

In this unit, students learn and practice capitalizing names of cities, states, countries, streets, buildings, bridges, and geographical places around the theme of Washington, D.C.

Objectives

The student reads and organizes information for a variety of purposes, including making a report, conducting interviews, taking a test, and performing an authentic task.

The student selects and uses a variety of appropriate reference materials, including multiple representations of information, such as maps, charts, and photos, to gather information for research projects.

The student prepares for writing by recording thoughts, focusing on a central idea, grouping related ideas, and identifying the purpose for writing.

Materials

- Computers
- Software to practice capitalization, such as CornerStone Language Arts Level A
- Books, maps, atlases,and travel guides concerning Washington, D.C.
- Materials for Learning Centers: worksheets, paper, markers, and crayons

Preparations

l. Program computers with a language program, such as CornerStone Language Arts Level A Capitalization Lesson 4.

2. Collect materials, travel guides, books, maps, and atlases of Washington, D.C.

3. Prepare materials for learning centers: worksheets, paper, markers, and crayons.

4. Establish rules, timeline, and rubric for use of centers.

Procedures

In a large group review rules for capitalization of names of cities, states, countries, streets, buildings, bridges, and geographical places. Use examples, non-examples, and modeling to practice these skills as students will encounter in centers and in real life. Discuss procedures, and rules for using centers. Divide the class into small groups and have them rotate through the learning centers: The number of computers and students will determine how long this unit will take. I have 5 computers; but, this could be done with only one computer. It would just take longer. This could also be taught as individual lesson in a unit. Nouns are the names of persons, places, and things. Proper nouns are the name of one specific person, place, or thing such as Sam White, Bogalusa, or Tyndall Airforce Base. Common nouns do not name a specific person, place, or thing such as boy, town, or airforce base.
Examples : Cedar Grove Elementary School -----proper names of nouns are capitalized.
Nonexample: school--common names of nouns are not capitalized.
Example: Panama City --proper name
nonexample: city--common name
Example: Florida--proper name
nonexample: state--common name
Model this with the students for additional practice on the board. Have the students capitalize the following sentences correctly:
1. We are going to mobile, alabama to visit my sister's school.
2. I went for a ride down the mississippi river on the southern bell.
3. Sally lives on east avenue next door to the grocery store.
4. Bill and Ted visited their grandmother in atlanta, georgia.
5. My friend and I flew to new orleans, louisiana to go to the zoo.
6. Next week I am going to see the grand canyon and yellow stone park.
7. Mary played ball at the carl gray park near her school.
8. Tommy goes to school in panama city, florida at cedar grove elementary school.

Lesson 1: Language Arts Center

Worksheets on capitalization Lesson 4 from CornerStone Language Arts Level A. The theme of the CornerStone program is Washington, D.C. (Any worksheet that allowed students to practice capitalization could be used here.)

Lesson 2: Reading Center

Read materials and books about Washington, D.C. and make a list of at least ten facts about Washington, D.C. using the rules for capitalization. (Place your name on the list and place it in the container at this center.) Some suggested books for this center are 'Washington, D.C.' by Catherine Reef, 'Discover the Sidewalks of Washington, D.C.' by Robert Seidenberg, 'District of Columbia in Words and Pictures' by Kathryn Lumley. (Any books about Washington,D.C. would do.) This information will be used in the writing center.

Lesson 3: Writing Center

Write a travel guide for you and a friend to use for sight seeing in Washington, D.C. Remember to use capital letters in your descriptions. Plan where you will go and what you will see on your tour. You need to select a motel, a place to eat, and 5 places of interest that you would like to visit. (You will use your travel guide in the math center.)

Lesson 4: Math Center

Use your travel guide from the writing center to create a timeline for your tour of Washington, D.C. Remember to use capital letters in proper nouns. What time will you start your tour? You will spend 1 hour and 30 minutes at the first place. It will take 30 minutes to reach the second sight on your tour. What time will you place on the timeline for the second place? You will spend 1 hour and 45 minutes at this place. You will then travel for 25 minutes to the third place on your tour. At what time will you arrive at the third place on your timeline? You will travel 15 minutes to a place for lunch. What time will you eat lunch? Allow 25 minutes for lunch. From the place you eat lunch you will walk for 20 minutes to the fourth place on your tour. At what time will you arrive at the fourth place on your tour? You will spend 1 hour and 22 minutes touring the fourth place and another 15 minutes walking to the fifth place on your tour. At what time will you arrive at the fifith place on your tour? You will spend 2 hours visiting this sight. At what time will you complete the tour and return to your motel? (Place your completed timeline in the container in the math center and your travel guide in the container at the writing center.)

Lesson 5: Spelling Center

Make a list of 15 proper nouns that are famous people and sights in Washington, D.C. that you would like to learn how to spell. Remember that all proper names of persons, places, and things need to be capitalized. Practice proper capitalization of nouns by including the names of important people, places and things found in Washington, D.C. in your list.

Study your list of words. You will exchange lists with a friend and call out the words for each other. You may check each other's word list. Put a check by each word that was spelled correctly. Be sure to put the name of the friend who checked your list at the bottom of the paper. Put the list in the container in the spelling center.

Lesson 6: Art Center

Draw pictures of you and your friend seeing the sights of Washington D.C. Write a caption at the bottom of each picture. Remember to use capital letters where they are needed in proper names of persons, places, or things. Be sure to put your name in the bottom right corner of each picture and place them in the container at this center.

Lesson 7: Geography Center

Use maps, travel guides, and atlases to plan a route to travel from your city to Washington D.C. Make a list of the cities, states, and highways that you would travel to go from your city to Washington, D.C. Place your name at the top of this page and put the list in the container in the Geography Center.
Be sure to capitalize all proper nouns.

Lesson 8: Computer Center

Use a software such as CornerStone Language Arts Level A Capitalization Lesson 4. This program happens to be about Washington D.C. CornerStone has a management program that can be used to evaluate the students' progress using capital letters. (Any software program on capitalization might be used here.)

Assessments

Some programs such as CornerStone Language Arts Level A has a management system that prints out eight different assessment reports for each student to show their progress on lessons and tests.

Rubric for use of centers:

4 The student shows what was read by organizing information into a travel guide and timeline using capitalization of proper names of persons, places and things. The student shows the appropriate selection and use of a variety of reference material. The student shows preparation for writing by recording thoughts, focusing on a centeral idea, grouping related ideas, and identifying the purpose for writing. Completes 8 centers with only 1 or 2 errors in capitalization.

3 The student demonstrates that they can read and organize information into a timeline and travel guide using conventional rules of capitalization of proper nouns.The student demonstrates the ability to use two reference materials to complete these centers. The student is able to record some ideas and write related ideas. Completes the 8 centers using rules of capitalization with only 3 or 4 errors.

2 The student can read and produce a timeline and a travel guide using capitalization of proper nouns. The student used only one refernce and was able to record only a few facts. Completes 8 centers using the rules of capitalization with 5 or 6 errors.

1 The student read and produced either a timeline or a travel guide. Completes the 8 centers with the help of a peer tutor or with assistance from an adult to keep them on task, with 7 or more errors in capitalization.

0 Center work is incomplete

Extensions

This lesson could be extended through math. A math center could include lessons on measurement of distance, and cost of travel expenses.
Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.