Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Reading and Recognizing Safety Signs

Cindy Stichweh
Santa Rosa District Schools

Description

This lesson teaches recognizing and comprehending the meaning of safety signs in the community to lower-level students and nonreaders.

Objectives

Identify and locate oral, print, or visual information for specified purposes.

Identify and locate oral, print, or visual information for specified purposes - with guidance and support.`

Participate in recognition and use of information when engaged in daily activities - with assistance.

Materials

-Pictures of the actual safety signs in the community, particularly Walk, Donít Walk, Pedestrian Crossing, and School Crossing (See Associated File)
-Clip art pictures or drawn pictures of signs (See Associated File)
-Digital camera and disk if needed
-Poster board in various colors (yellow, red, green)
-Templates of pedestrian and school crossing symbols
-2 Small buckets full of sand
-Food coloring
-Glue
-Markers
-Checklist, one per student (See Associated File)

Preparations

1. Take pictures with a digital camera of actual community signs of the words WALK and DONíT WALK or use associated file pictures.
2. Take pictures of the actual symbols that flash at the street corners for WALK and DONíT WALK or use associated file pictures.
3. Take pictures of the symbols for Pedestrian Crossing and School Crossing signs or use associated file pictures.
4. Print out pictures of the safety signs taken with the digital camera and/or the pictures in the associated file.
5. Enlarge these pictures to at least an 8Ē x 10Ē size and laminate.
6. Find pictures from books or from clip art showing the signs with the words or use associated file pictures. The words can be done on a computer and made as large as needed.
7. Gather together and post on the classroom wall at least 10 safety signs (including the four you will teach) that are large enough for the students to see.
8. Gather together markers, sand, glue, food coloring, poster board (yellow, red, green).
9. Use food coloring to dye the two small buckets of sand--one green and one red.
10. Make the names of the safety signs on the computer so that they are large and easily seen from a distance.
11. Download and copy one Checklist for each student. (See Associated File)

Procedures

NOTES
-This lesson has been designed for educable and trainable mentally handicapped. It is also applicable for nonreaders or those with limited English proficiency.
-This lesson only concentrates on four different safety signs--WALK, DONíT WALK, PEDESTRIAN CROSSING, SCHOOL CROSSING, but it can be used to teach any safety or survival signs, and signs can be added as needed.

INDEPENDENT LEVEL
1. Ask the students if they know some of the rules that need to be followed when they walk around the community.

2. Ask the students to look around the room at the safety signs posted on the wall to see if they recognize any of them, if they can read the words associated with that sign, and if they can explain the meaning of that sign.

3. Direct students' attention to the posted safety signs (See Associated File) as you explain and demonstrate the meaning of each sign.

4. Make sure students know what the word PEDESTRIAN means. PED rhymes with KEDS (shoe company) and that is a shoe you wear on your foot, etc.

5. If you have located clip art of people on foot and people in cars and on public transportation, use this to ask who is a pedestrian. Do this until the students can identify a pedestrian.

6. Have students use glue to write the words WALK and DONíT WALK on the poster board. Sprinkle green sand on the word WALK, and red sand on the words DONíT WALK. Shake off excess sand.

7. Once the poster board dries, students trace this over several times with their fingers as they say the words. Listen as the students do this activity and provide corrective feedback as necessary.

8. Model the meaning of the signs being worked on by demonstrating and verbalizing the actions taken when the sign occurs.

9. Show actual pictures of these signs in the community that were taken with a digital camera. (See Associated File)

10. Tell students to match the clip art pictures and/or actual pictures with the names of the signs. Peers provide feedback to each other. Monitor, practice and provide feedback as needed.

11. Students practice reading, saying and/or demonstrating the meanings of the four signs.


SUPPORTED LEVEL
1. Follow the procedure above, but if the student cannot tell the meaning of the sign, give the student a choice of four. If the student can read the words, have the student pick the word out. If the student cannot read, give the choices orally and let the student tell you.

PARTICIPATORY LEVEL
1. Follow the procedure above, but the teacher may have to write out words for the student to put glue over as they write their words in sand.

2. If the student cannot tell the meaning of the sign when given a choice of four, narrow the choices down to only two.

Assessments

INDEPENDENT LEVEL
-When given the signs WALK, DONíT WALK, PEDESTRIAN CROSSING and SCHOOL CROSSING, the student reads the sign and gives the meaning of the four signs presented in the lesson.
-Goal 3 Standard assessment: The student keeps a checklist (See Associated File) of all the signs mastered by putting in the date they master the sign.

SUPPORTED LEVEL
-When given the signs WALK, DONíT WALK, PEDESTRIAN CROSSING and SCHOOL CROSSING, the student reads the sign and gives the meaning if given four choices.
-Goal 3 Standard assessment: The student keeps a checklist (See Associated File) of all the signs mastered by putting in the date they master the sign.

PARTICIPATORY LEVEL
-When given the signs WALK, DONíT WALK, PEDESTRIAN CROSSING and SCHOOL CROSSING, the student reads the sign and gives the meaning if given two choices.
-Goal 3 Standard assessment: The student keeps a checklist (See Associated File) of all the signs mastered by putting in the date they master the sign.

Extensions

Keep reviewing these signs as you begin to teach lessons on any new signs. After about 20 to 30 signs have been taught, take the students on a field trip in the community to experience the signs they have been learning.
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