Beacon Lesson Plan Library

You Gotta Have A Hat

Gail Przeclawski
Orange County Schools

Description

This lesson presents the folktale, [Caps for Sale], and a different version of the same tale, [The Hatseller and the Monkeys], for students to compare and contrast.

Objectives

The student identifies similarities and differences between two texts (for example, in topics, characters, and problems).

Materials

-Book: Slobodkina, Esphyr. [Caps for Sale: A Tale of a Peddler, Some Monkeys, and their Monkey Business]. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1985, c1940.
-Book: Diakite, Baba Wague. [The Hatseller and the Monkeys: A West African Tale]. New York: Scholastic Press, 1999.
-A graphic organizer such as a double bubble map (See Associated File), Venn diagram or T-chart
-Picture of printing press (optional)
-Various caps and hats (optional)
-Stuffed monkeys or puppets (optional)
-Craft sticks, one per student (optional)

Preparations

1. Create a graphic organizer such as a double bubble map (See Associated File), a Venn diagram or a T-chart on chart paper large enough for the whole class to see. If the blank chart is laminated first, then wipe off markers can be used during the lesson and the chart can be reused. To keep the results, laminate after recording student responses.
2. Read the two books to become familiar with the story lines and to practice pronunciation. Take notice of the author’s note at the end of [The Hatseller and the Monkeys].
3. Obtain a picture of a printing press (optional).
4. Gather a variety of caps/hats (optional).
5. Obtain some stuffed monkeys or puppets (optional).
6. To randomly select students for responses (See Procedures, step #7), write each student's name on a craft stick prior to the lesson (optional).

Procedures

1. Begin class by asking: What is the person who writes books called? (author) Then, holding up the books, dramatically announce that no one knows the authors of these two books!

2. (Teacher-directed study) A long time ago, before the printing press, copy machines, and computers were invented, people told stories. They had no way other than writing their stories out to spread their stories. Imagine how long it would take to write out a book by hand. And what if your cousins or friends wanted to share your story; would you be willing to copy your book for each of them? No, I don't think so. Well, that's how folktales came about. One person would tell another person a story, then that person would tell someone else. By the time books could be printed, many times no one knew who first told the story. Therefore, instead of listing the author, printed folktales or fairy tales would sometimes state: “retold by.”

3. Show the two different books based upon the same folktale. Explain that after the readings, students will list ways the two stories are the same and the ways they are different.

4. Read [The Hatseller and the Monkeys] to the students, stopping frequently to ask for predictions of what will happen next. Engage the students by having them participate during the reading, maybe acting/speaking as the monkeys when appropriate.

5. Discuss briefly what they liked about this story, and then present the book [Caps for Sale].

6. Read the book [Caps for Sale] and engage students by having them call along with the peddler “Caps! Caps for sale! 50 cents a cap!” as appropriate. Check for comprehension throughout by asking for a hand gesture to indicate same or different. For instance, have the students make fists with their thumbs out. Touching their 2 thumbs together would indicate “the same,” while rotating the hands so the pinky fingers are touching and the thumbs are pointing in different directions would indicate “different.” Do this on only a few key points to get the students thinking. Do not cover every point.

7. Display a graphic organizer such as a double bubble map (See Associated File), a Venn diagram or a T-chart for the class. Each student gets a turn to tell one thing about the books and whether that item was the same or different as the teacher records their information on the graphic organizer. Do not have students raise their hands, call on each one. Either go in order starting at one side and proceeding around the group in order, so students can anticipate when their turn will be, or pick craft sticks, with a student’s name on each stick, out of a container until all are selected.

Assessments

The teacher uses a graphic organizer to display student responses in comparing and contrasting items from the two books, #1 [Caps for Sale] and #2 [The Hatseller and the Monkeys]. Every student orally identifies either one same or one different aspect of the two books. (See Associated File for suggested answers) The following suggested criteria can be used to assess the story information given by the students.

COMMENDABLE
- The student recalls a segment of the two stories and correctly identifies if the segments are the same or different.

ACCEPTABLE
- The teacher prompts a section of the stories, such as setting, main character, problem, or resolution. The student recalls that segment in both books and correctly identifies if the segments are the same or different.
- The teacher describes a specific segment in one book, the student connects it to the companion section in the other book and correctly identifies if the segments are the same or different.
- The teacher describes a specific segment in one book and connects it to the companion section in the other book. The student correctly identifies if the segments are the same or different.

SEE TEACHER
- The student can not correctly identify any aspects of the stories as the same or different, even with teacher support.

Extensions

1. There are many folktales that have a variety of versions. This activity could be repeated with different folktales.
2. A third book could be added to these two books to compare and contrast. The third boook could be another version of the folktale, or it could be a nonfiction book about monkeys or about selling merchandise. Using a nonfiction book after students have a successful experience comparing and contrasting these related folktales is a good way to introduce the concept of different books for different uses. Having students compare and contrast the characters, plot, problem and resolution of a fiction and nonfiction book will allow the students to discover for themselves that nonfiction books may not have characters, plot, a problem or resolution.

Web Links

This Website lets students rate the book and gives related links.
THE HATSELLER AND THE MONKEYS by Baba W. Diakite -- K-3 Young

This Website gives a short biography of Baba Wague Diakite.
Biography

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.