Beacon Lesson Plan Library

A Love Design

Sandra McCreary

Description

This activity is used to critically analyze the students' understanding of one of the body's structures, the heart, and how it is specifically designed and adapted for each of its functions.

Objectives

The student knows that body structures are uniquely designed and adapted for their function.

Materials

-Internet capability to access Websites (See Weblinks)
-LCD Projector (lightbox)
-Projection screen
-A computer capable of handling the LCD Projector technology
-Construction paper (3 sheets per student)
-Modeling clay (6 containers per class of 30 students)
-Yarn (6 spools in various colors is adequate for at least six classes)
-Straws (1 package of 30 straws per class)
-Toothpicks (1 box 800-count is adequate for at least six classes)
-Glue (6 containers)
-Tape (6 rolls)
-Scisscors (12 pairs minimum)
-Unlabeled heart diagram, two copies per student (Download the diagram of your preference from one of the two Websites listed in Weblinks.)
-One overhead transparency of the unlabeled heart diagram
-Definition Worksheet, one copy per student (See Associated File)
-Rubrics for A Love Design Diagrams and Models (See Associated File)

Preparations

1. Make sure you have a computer or television in your classroom to connect the LCD projector or lightbox.
2. Acquire instructions on how to use the LCD projector and practice prior to presentation.
3. Make two copies per student of the unlabeled heart diagram from the Website. (See Weblinks) You may also use another diagram that you prefer from a Website or textbook.
4. Make an overhead transparency of the heart diagram.
5. Make student copies of the Definition Worksheet. (See Associated File)
6. Make copies of the Rubrics for A Love Design Diagrams and Models for student evaluations. (See Associated File)
7. Purchase materials needed to construct or design the heart models (construction paper, modeling clay, yarn, straws, toothpicks, glue, tape, scissors and a clean copy of the unlabeled heart diagram).

Procedures

NOTE: This lesson addresses one body stucture, the heart, and requires that students already understand the definition of muscles and how they function.

1. Discuss with the students the recent events of a great baseball player, Darrell Kile, who died in his hotel room prior to a ball game. Also mention basketball hall of famer, Pete Maravich, horse of the century, Secretariat, and the great runner, Jim Ryan.

2. Elicit discussion from the students as to reasons why they think the people mentioned in the examples died.

3. Review with the students the definition of a muscle and remind them why the heart is a muscle.

4. Access the Internet and display a diagram of the heart using the LCD projector and screen. (See Weblinks)

5. Tell the students to take notes.

6. Explain to the students how the heart is adapted to its function.

7. Name the parts of the heart and define their functions by clicking on the heart glossary in the body of the text.

8. Distribute the diagram of the unlabeled heart.

9. Have the students work independently to label the parts of the heart on their handouts. Allow ample time for them to complete this task to assess whether the students understand the material presented to them.

10. Walk around the classroom to check individual student's progress.

11. Have the students make corrections on their handouts during the wrap-up session.

12. Place a copy of an unlabeled heart on the overhead and elicit students to volunteer the answers to each part.

13. Provide students with the Definition Worksheet (See Associated File) which describes the function of each part of the heart. Students are responsible for filling in the blanks correctly. The completed worksheet is submitted for grading. (See Assessments)

NOTE: The second class period begins with construction of the heart diagrams.

14. Have the students construct a model of a heart with the materials provided by the teacher as a review and a fun exercise. The materials needed for the model are: construction paper, modeling clay, yarn, straws, toothpicks, glue, tape, scissors and a clean copy of the unlabeled heart diagram. (Make available the Rubric for A Love Design Models so students are familiar with the assessment criteria prior to the construction.)

15. Walk around the classroom and assess the students' progress and provide help where needed. Encourage the students to use a variety of the materials provided and to take their time as they construct their model.

16. During the critique of the students' models, determine if an additional day of class time may be needed for completion of this project.

17. Assist students with their projects by displaying the heart diagram from the Website. Students may also use their labeled diagrams from the first class period.

18. Ensure that students are allowed time for clean up after submission of their designs.

19. Students' diagrams and models are submitted at the end of the second (or third) class period for assessment.

20. Assess their work using the Rubrics for A Love Design Diagrams and Models in the Associated File.

21. The diagrams and models will be returned to the students within three to five days after the culmination of the lesson for a wrap-up session so that students may see their progress and know the areas which need improvement.

Assessments

1. HEART DIAGRAMS: Assess the students' labeling of the heart diagrams. The diagrams are submitted and used to assess the students' understanding of one of the body's structures, the heart. Students should correctly identify the following parts on their heart diagrams: aorta, inferior vena cava, left atrium, left ventricle, mitral valve, pulmonary artery, pulmonary valve, pulmonary vein, right atrium, right ventricle, septum, superior vena cava, and tricuspid valve. The Rubric for A Love Design Diagrams is available in the Associated File.

2. DEFINITION WORKSHEET: Students are given a Definition Worksheet (See Associated File) which describes the function of each part and they are responsible for filling in the blanks correctly. The definitions worksheet is submitted for grading and used to assess the students' further understanding of one of the body's structures, the heart.

3. HEART MODELS: Students create or design a heart model using various materials provided by the teacher. The models are submitted for assessment by the teacher. The Rubric for A Love Design Models (See Associated File) is used to assess the heart models.

Extensions

The procedures of this lesson could be adapted for any major organ of the human body. The teacher would have to create the ancillary materials to accompany the adapted lesson.

Web Links

Enchanted Learning Website copyright gives permission to print heart diagram
Heart Diagram

Enchanted Learning Website copyright gives permission to print heart diagram
Permission

Web supplement for A Love Design
Heart Information

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