Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Floating Forms Falling!

Wanda Perkins
Escambia County Schools

Description

The student draws the five basic three-dimensional forms using tools (pencil, ruler, compass, protractor, etc.) and techniques (value application) proficiently and in a safe, responsible manner.

Objectives

The student uses tools, media, processes, and techniques proficiently, knowledgeably, and in a safe and responsible manner.

Materials

-Class set of practice paper or newsprint, 12” x 18”
-Class set of white drawing paper, 12” x 18”
-Class set of No.2 pencils
-Class set of rulers
-Class set of protractors
-Class set of compasses
-A set of the following items for each table in the classroom:
orange, sugar cube, can of coke, sugar cone, wheat thins glued together to form a pyramid
-5 Large styrofoam spheres of different colors
-5 Large styrofoam pyramids of different colors
-5 Large styrofoam cubes of different colors
-5 Large styrofoam cones of different colors
-5 Large styrofoam cylinders of different colors
-Chalk for board or markers for white board
-Fishing line or string

Preparations

1. Gather materials and supplies needed for the lesson (pencils, rulers, compasses, protractors, 12” x 18” practice paper or newsprint, 12” x 18” white drawing paper, oranges, cans of coke, styrofoam cubes, cones, pyramids, cylinders, and spheres, wheat thins glued together to form pyramids, sugar cubes, sugar cones).
2. A day before the lesson begins, hang colorful styrofoam forms (cylinders, cones, pyramids, spheres, and cubes) from the ceiling of the classroom (use fishing line or string).
3. Prepare a tray of items for each table (1 orange, a can of coke, a cube of sugar, pyramid made of wheat thins, and a sugar cone). Place one tray of items on each table.
4. Gather chalk for chalkboard or markers for white board.
5. Make a copy of the Safe and Responsible Use of Tools Checklist. (See Associated File)

Procedures

1. Say to students, “What did you notice upon entering the room today?”

2. Point out the different forms hanging from the ceiling and encourage students to identify each kind of form. Have students compare the styrofoam forms hanging from the ceiling to the food items on the table to determine how they are alike and how they are different.

3. Discuss three-dimensional forms and model how to draw each form by drawing them on the board for students to see. (See Visual Vocabulary in the Associated File)

4. Distribute practice paper and pencils to students.

5. Have students practice drawing the five basic three-dimensional forms, using pencil, on the practice paper provided. Teacher circulates around the room and gives feedback to the students.

6. Discuss 3 techniques of adding value (blending, crosshatching, stippling) to the form in order to show volume and model how to add value to each form drawn on the board.

7. Have the students continue to use their pencils to practice adding value (blending, crosshatching, stippling) to the forms which they drew on their practice paper. Teacher circulates around the room and gives feedback to students.

8. Have students compare their practice drawings to others at their table and make any changes needed to improve their practice drawings. Teacher addresses questions from students and continues to provide feedback.

9. Prior to distribution of tools, discuss correct use of tools and safety rules with the students. (See Safety Rules in Associated File)

10. Distribute tools (ruler, compass, protractor, etc.) and drawing paper to each student.

11. Have students draw the 5 basic three-dimensional forms using pencil and three kinds of value for shading their forms. Encourage students to demonstrate proficiency in their drawings.

12. Encourage students to compare their drawings to the styrofoam forms hanging from the ceiling and to the food items on the table by asking questions such as: How is your drawing of a sphere similar to the styrofoam sphere hanging from the ceiling and the orange in your tray? Compare your use of shading techniques to the values on the actual forms. Do your drawn forms appear as realistic as the styrofoam forms and the food items?

13. Students give feedback on level of difficulty and engage in self-assessment by answering questions such as: Which forms were easy to draw and shade? Which forms were the most difficult and why? Think about processes and techniques. How may you improve your drawing?

Assessments

Evidence: The student draws the five basic three-dimensional forms using tools (pencil, ruler, compass, protractor, etc.) and techniques (value application) proficiently and in a safe, responsible manner.
Criteria:
1. Uses a pencil to draw three-dimensional forms.
2. Uses a ruler/protractor to draw lines and angles.
3. Uses a compass/protractor to draw circles and curves.
4. Uses a variety of shading (value) techniques to show volume.

Use the Checklist to assess the students' safe and responsible use of tools. (See Associated File)

Web Links

The site provides further instruction and techniques on drawing and shading three-dimensional forms.
Sanford : A Lifetime of Color

Return to the Beacon Lesson Plan Library.