Beacon Lesson Plan Library

Rosa Parks Refused to Do What?

Eva Abrams
Bay District Schools

Description

Rosa Parks Refused to Do What? enables students to learn about an African-American woman whose brave act led to the Montgomery bus boycott organized by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Objectives

The student drafts and revises simple sentences and passages, stories, letters, and simple explanations that-express ideas clearly-show an awareness of topic and audience-have a beginning, middle, and ending-effectively use common words-have supporting detail; and-are in legible printing.

The student knows significant individuals in United States history since 1880 (e.g., presidents, scientists and inventors, significant women, and people who have worked to achieve equality and improve individual lives).

Materials

-A PICTURE BOOK OF ROSA PARKS by David A. Adler, Holiday House, 1995
- I AM ROSA PARKS, by Rosa Parks and James Haskins, Dial Books for Young Readers, 1997
-Internet link for interview with Rosa Parks, URL www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/par0int-1
-Chart paper
-Markers
-Materials (copy paper with a construction paper cover) for one blank Rosa Parks' booklet per group. (Directions can be found in the Teacher Preparation section of this lesson.)
-Encyclopedia on software, such as Microsoft Encarta, etc.
-Internet links to conduct research, See Weblinks

Preparations

1. Get books about Rosa Parks from your school library or the public library. Preview each of the books to make sure they are appropriate for the level of your students.
2. Make sample booklets as a model for students.
3. Make booklets for each group. Staple 2-3 folded 8 1/2 x 11-inch copy paper and construction paper cover together book-style.
4. Bookmark web links and set up encyclopedia software to the proper place if students will be using them for teacher-directed -research.- Preview each of the web sites to check connectivity and ensure appropriateness for your students' level.

Procedures

1. Ask students if they know who -the mother of the civil rights movement- was. Record student answers on chart paper.

2. Tell students you are going to read them two stories about -the mother of the civil rights movement.-

3. Read A PICTURE BOOK OF ROSA PARKS by David A. Adler. Explain any vocabulary that students may not know as you are reading the story.

4. Ask students questions about Parks' childhood, education, jobs, problems, and accomplishments. Record and organize this information on a web so students can refer to it when they write.

5. Inform students that they will listen to an interview with Rosa Parks on the Internet. The teacher will go to the Internet link: www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/par0int-1. The teacher should read the parts of the interview that do not have the video/audio capabilities. The teacher should play the video/audio portions of the interview by clicking on the word -video- or -audio.- In addition, the teacher needs to click on the camera icons to view pictures that accompany that part of the interview.

6. Ask students questions about the interview with Rosa Parks. Record and organize this information on a web so students can refer to it when they write.

7. Read I AM ROSA PARKS by Rosa Parks and James Haskins. Explain any vocabulary students may not know as you are reading the story.

8. Ask students questions about Parks' childhood, education, jobs, problems, and accomplishments. Record and organize this information on a web so students can refer to it when they write.

9. Explain to students that what they have just done as a class is -research- to find out information about someone. (-Research- at this level is mostly teacher-directed and closely supervised.)

10. Students will work in small groups to design, draft, write, and illustrate a booklet about Rosa Parks and her role in the civil rights movement. Examples would include her refusal to give up her seat to a white man on the bus, her arrest, the bus boycott, and her continuing fight against racism. Students can use the two books that were read aloud as well as the websites as resources. Likewise, students may use an encyclopedia CD and/or the Internet to conduct further -research- about Rosa Parks for their booklet with teacher supervision (URL's are listed in the Materials section of this lesson).

11. Students will share their booklets with the class by reading them aloud over the next several days.

Assessments

1. Ask questions to determine if students identify Rosa Parks as a significant individual in United States' history since 1880 whose brave act led to the Montgomery bus boycott which was part of the civil rights movement.
2. Assess the booklets made by the students to see if they recognized Rosa Parks as a significant individual in United States' history since 1880 whose brave act led to the Montgomery bus boycott which was part of the civil rights movement.
3. Assess if the simple explanations written in the booklet express ideas clearly, show an awareness of topic and audience, effectively use common words, and are in legible writing.
Scale -
3 points = if work meets all criteria-Great work!
2 points = if work meets 2 of the three criteria-Nice job!
1 point = if work meets 1 of the three criteria-Let's look again.
0 points = No effort-See me now, please.

Extensions

This lesson could be part of a unit about famous American women or used during Black History month.

Web Links

Web supplement for Rosa Parks Refused to Do What?
Rosa Parks

Web supplement for Rosa Parks Refused to Do What?
Rosa Parks

Web supplement for Rosa Parks Refused to Do What?
Great Women in History

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